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WILMINGTON-MOREHEAD 

Official Publication 

N. C. State Ports Authority 




STONE TOWING LINE 



4 South Water St. 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Tel. 4547 



Peter B. Ruffin, President 
W. D. Williams, Secretary 



W. P. Emerson, Vice-President 
J. P. Wilson, Treasurer 



Wilmington bhipping Lompany 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 270 
Telephone 2-3381 



Cable Address 
WILSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



Atlantic and East Carolina 
Railroad Company 

SERVING THE PORT OF MOREHEAD CITY 

Big Enough To Do The Job . . . Yet Small Enough 
To Take A Personal Interest In Each Shipper 







.V. C. S. P. A. Terminal, Port of Morekead City 

NEW BERN, NORTH CAROLINA 




SECURITY 

NATIONAL BANK 

North Carolina's 
Largest National Bank 



GREENSBORO - BURLINGTON - HIGH POINT 
RALEIGH TARBORO WILMINGTON 



Member Federal Reserve System • Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



MTII CAROLINA PORTS 




Official Publication 

North Carolina State 

Ports Authority 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

Chairman Edwin Pate 

Vice-Chairman Raymond A. Bryan 

Secretary-Treasurer W. Avery Thompson 

Member J. Harry White 

Member Harvey W. Moore 

Member Harold F. Coffey 

H. V. Conly Asst. Secretary 

Executive Director 

COL. G. W. GILLETTE 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

H. V. Conly Asst. to Director 

E. E. Lee, Jr. Traffic Manager 

Frank C. Adams ... Public Relations 

WILMINGTON OFFICE 

P. O. Box 1048 
Telephone — 3-1622 

Philip L. Sullivan Terminal Manager 

H. N. Larcombe... Commercial Representative 

MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

P. O. Box 145 
Telephone — 6-3159 

J. D. Holt Terminal Manager 

Camden P. Fessant Assistant 

• 
NORTH CAROLINA PORTS is the only offi- 
cial publication of the N. C. State Ports 
Authority, and editorial content and adver- 
tising is under the direction of the public 
relations office, P. O. Box 1048, Wilmington, 
N. C. 

• 

December, 1953 — Vol. 1, No. 1 

— 4 



PYRAMID 

CONSTRUCTION 
CO.. INC. 



COMMERCIAL 

AND INDUSTRIAL 

CONSTRUCTION 

PILE DRIVING 
DOCKS-WHARVES 

Waterfront Construction 
of All Types 




DIAL 2-8240 

3608 OLEANDER DR. 




SPA Fumigating Plant 



Ports Are Vital To State 



A Statement by Governor William B. Umstead 

North Carolina has now completed two excellent ports, one at More- 
head City and one at Wilmington, which are operated hy the North Caro- 
lina State Ports Authority. The construction of these ports was another 
step in the development of our State. However, the port facilities as such 
cannot, and will not, bring to us a substantial export and import trade. 

In view of the increasingly competitive 
nature of world-wide overseas shipping', 
this trade must be developed through a 
sound program, which will pay great di- 
vidends to the State of North Carolina. 
The successful operation of these ports 
will require skilled specialists and con- 
siderable time and planning. The General 
Assembly of 1953 reorganized the mem- 
bership of the North Carolina State Ports 
Authority and, under the provisions of 
this statute, I have made my appoint- 
ments. All members of the Ports Authori- 
ty are capable businessmen with sound 
judgment and ability to direct the opera- 
tion of these facilities. 

Our ports at Morehead City and Wil- 
mington are gateways to the seven seas 
and will serve as valuable avenues of com- 
merce in promoting greater prosperity 
and growth for North Carolina. Their real 
contribution to the future development 
and advancement of North Carolina will 
depend upon how effectively we can make 
them serve the interest of our State. This 
is a big job, which will require tireless 
energy and the best talent which can be 
found. 

I am confident that our State ports will 
make a real contribution in attracting 
new industry for North Carolina. We know 
that many industrial leaders are looking 
to the South as the land of opportunity 
for expansion and future growth. These 
new ports must be considered as utilities 
designed for transportation, like our high- 
ways and our railroad lines, connecting 
our inland transportation systems with 
water transportation to the world, and 
will open new avenues of commerce for 
industries in our State. 

These ports will also serve agriculture 
and agricultural products. This should re- 
sult in substantial savings to our farm 




HON. WILLIAM B. UMSTEAD 
Governor of North Carolina 



people and to our State. We are first in 
the growth of flue-cured tobacco and the 
manufacture of tobacco products, so it is 
only natural to expect tobacco to be im- 
portant in the export trade through our 
ports. However, textiles, cotton, furniture, 
peanuts, foodstuffs and grain will be 
among the other products that can be ex- 
pected to be exported in bulk. Some of the 
imports probably will include certain types 
of tobacco, Egyptian cotton, mahogany 
logs from South America for furniture 
and veneers, bauxite for the manufacture 
of aluminum, steel, iron and other ores, 
fertilizers, and many other products. 
(Continued on Page 12) 



Arsenal on The 

Construction of Ammunition Loading Terminal 

By COL. R. L. HILL, U. S. Engineer, Wilmington District 

The Wilmington District of the Corps of Engineers is currently en- 
gaged in its largest peacetime construction project since the District Office 
was established in North Carolina some 68 years ago. 

installation 



This 
is the Wilmington 
Ammunition Load- 
ing Terminal, lo- 
cated on the west 
side of the Cape 
Fear River, some 
15 miles south of 
Wilmington and 
immediately north 
of Southport. Di- 
rectly opposite the 
area are the re- 
mains of once 
proud and mighty 
Fort Fisher. Popular conception has dub- 
bed the new facility "Sunny Point" be- 
cause of an old plantation by that name 
which existed there. 

The terminal, a pilot project for the 
army, is scheduled to be operated by the 
Transportation Corps. Plans make no pro- 




U. 



COL. R. L. HILL 
S. District Engineer 



visions for storage; instead, the installa- 
tion will handle the shipment of ammuni- 
tion direct from land carriers to cargo 
vessels. 

Some 9,000 acres of land, which are to 
be fenced and circled by a perimeter road 
for roving patrol vehicles, have been pur- 
chased in fee simple as a locale for the 
project. A buffer zone, comprising another 
5,000 acres, has been acquired under ease- 
ment to provide a safety area around the 
reservation proper. 

Dredging operations, embracing the re- 
moval of 18,000,000 cubic yards of spoil 
and scheduled to be completed next Janu- 
ary, are in progress by the McWilliams 
Dredging Corporation of New Orleans, La. 
This phase includes a main channel branch- 
ing off from the river channel below 
Wharf No. 1, running by the three 
wharves, and rejoining the river channel 



Crane swings 1004b. (3 ieet) rail into position on Access Railroad. Construction gang says the 
line is not as long as some but just as wide. It connects the projects with the ACL 18 miles away. 




•0> 



ape Fear River 



north of Wharf No. 3. Another approach 
channel leads to the middle wharf. The 
channels are 34 feet deep by 300 feet 
wide, and broaden to 800 feet opposite 
each wharf to provide turning basins. Such 
an arrangement provide an ingress - 
egress route for each wharf and permits 
a ship to operate without having- to come 
in close contact with ships abreast of 
other wharves. This flexibility is of par- 
ticular advantage in the event a vessel 
must be removed to a remote area for 
purposes of safety. 

The wharves are being constructed by 
the Diamond Construction Company of Sa- 
vannah, Ga. They are located about one- 
half mile apart, are 2400 feet long and 
87 feet wide, and will be constructed with 
reinforced concrete deck supported on 10,- 
000 concrete piles. These docks will be 
protected with a fender system of green- 
hart timbers. Each wharf will accommo- 
date three Liberty type ships and will be 
serviced by a single line railroad which 
spreads to three tracks atop the decks. 

The William A. Smith Construction 
Company of Houston, Texas has been en- 
gaged in building the Access Railroad for 
the past eight months. This 18-mile line 



leaves the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 
near Leland, N. C, and connects with the 
rail system within the reservation. It will 
be finished in 1953. 

Construction of the Site Railroad is ex- 
pected to get underway within the next 
few weeks. A contract for building some 
38 miles of trackage through a network 
of yards, spurs and sidings, has been 
awarded to T. P. Scholes, Inc., a firm of 
Reading, Pa. The entire railway system 
will comprise about 70 miles of track, 
with the main line of 100-lb. rail and 85- 
lb. type for sidings and spurs. 

After the necessary design work is 
completed, other contracts will be award- 
ed for administrative facilities, utilities, 
electric power, and telecommunications. 

All structures within the danger area 
are designed to resist damage from explo- 
sions and fire. Moreover, additional em- 
phasis is given to facilities and equip- 
ment for fighting large fires. Completion 
of the terminal is expected in mid-1955. 

Transportation Corps officials selected 
Sunny Point for the terminal, because it 
adequately meets requirements for: con- 
nection with air, water, rail and highway 
facilities. 



Access Railroad trestle inches across Town Creek, the latter famed for spring herring runs. 
Piling are chemically treated to last indefinitely. 








SPA Seeks Executive Head 



Agency Members Look 

To Busy Year Ahead 

With the resignations of A. G. Myers 
of Gastonia as Chairman, and Col. G. W. 
Gillette as Executive Director, the N. C. 
State Ports Authority under the chair- 
manship of Edwin Pate, approaches the 
New Year with a membership vacancy 
and the task of finding a new administra- 
tive head. 

A committee of SPA members headed 
by the chairman is seeking the best qual- 
ified man available in a highly specialized 
field to further develop and promote the 
state's multi-million dollar marine termi- 
nals at the Ports of Wilmington and 
Morehead City, as well as the fortunes 
of the smaller ports and harbors on North 
Carolina's extensive coast. There is no ter- 
ritorial limit to the agency's survey of 
executive talent with the necessary ex- 
perience and background. 

Mr. Myers, one of the state's best known 
financial and textile figures, asked to be 
relieved in October after more than eight 
years of service as vice-chairman and 
chairman under the administrations of 
three governors. Impaired health made 
his retirement necessary, he told his fel- 
low SPA members and Governor Umstead. 




Chairman Edwin Pate 

He had served since the beginning of SPA 
in 1945. 

Colonel Gillette, who was appointed ex- 
ecutive director in 1948 on his retirement 
from the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, 
made his request to be relieved from active 
SPA duty at the year's end to permit him 
to enter private enterprise. Under his su- 



AU seven of Governor Umstead's appointments to the North Carolina State Ports are seen 
together below as they took oath of office from State Supreme Court Associate Justice Jeff D. 
Johnson, Jr. From the left they are Edwin Pate. W. Avery Thompson. Raymond A. Bryan, Harvey 
W. Moore, A. G. Myers, J. Harry White and Harold F. Coffey. Governor Umstead looks on al the 
extreme right. 





Guide Agency After Dec. 31 

k 




A. G. Myers 



Col. G. W. Gillette 



pervision, the state terminals had been 
planned and constructed; the first 18 
months of operations had been carried 
out. The facilities are recognized as among 
the most modern on the Atlantic Coast. 
The reorganized SPA board which took 
office last July not only faces the task 
of finding top personnel, but has on its 
agenda a number of major port develop- 
ments which will make 1954 a busy and 



productive year. Its membership, repre- 
senting the state's major industrial busi- 
ness and financial interests, is devoting 
individual time and effort to the promo- 
tion of ocean traffic through the state's 
recently improved harbors. 

As the new chairman, Edwin Pate 
brings to the SPA his experience as a 
Laurinburg banker and an executive of 
(Continued on Page 21) 



The Wilmington Savings & Trust Co. 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

"North Carolina's Port Bank" 



Capital 
$300,000 



♦ 



Surplus 
$1,000,000 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 

and 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 

.4 Symbol of Service and Progress Since 1888 



N. C. Ports Serve Defense 



National defense has been one of the 
effective supporting arguments for the 
expenditure of federal funds for the pro- 
jection and maintenance of American har- 
bors and waterways, and now both the 
Ports of Wilmington and Morehead City 
are facilitating operations at North Caro- 
lina's largest military establishments. 

The U. S. Marine training center at 
Camp Lejeune and air base at Cherry 
Point have used the new SPA docks and 
warehouses at Morehead City from the 
date of their completion for a steady flow 
of personnel and supply. Supporting equip- 
ment and supply move over the docks to 
scores of U. S. Navy vessels for periodic 
maneuvers in the Caribbean and for tours 
of service in the Mediterranean. 

The acute need of the armed forces for 
the best type of shipside storage and 
transit facilities in 1952 influenced the 
N. C. State Ports Authority to lease to 
the navy its largest warehouse units which 
had been constructed with export tobacco 
storage in mind. In addition to serving the 
needs of the Marines, however, the mili- 

Thousands of feet of concrete paved open 
storage adjacent to SPA transit sheds and 
warehouses at Morehead City facilitate the 
movement of military supplies and equipment. 
In the picture below. Marines are returning from 
recent maneuvers. Immediate access by rail 
and motor transport are also features of the 
state docks at Wilmington where these atomic 
artillery units are moving out for the defense 
of Western Europe. 



tary account has proved profitable from 
a standpoint of storage, wharfage and 
other services, as tonnages handled con- 
tinually mount. 

Ft. Bragg is among the largest military 
establishments in the East, and the selec- 
tion of the Port of Wilmington by the 
Pentagon and the New York Port of Em- 
barkation to move highly important con- 
tingents for the support of the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization in Western Eu- 
rope is considered significant. Top military 
figures have observed the operation over 
the state docks and have indicated that 
the ease and economy with which large 
transports are docked and personnel and 
cargo dispatched will insure future utili- 
zation of the facilities. 




Seaboard, Heide Build For Nitrate 




The first new warehousing structure to 
replace the bulk storage space lost in the 
$10,000,000 Wilmington waterfront fire of 
last March is due for completion Decem- 
ber 15 in time for a year end movement 
of Chilean nitrate. 

W. S. R. Beane, executive of Heide & 
Company, said the new 100 x 400 foot con- 
crete and steel building will represent an 
investment of around $(500,000 including 
handling equipment. The structure is be- 
ing built by the Seaboard Air Line Rail- 
road Company for lease to Heide for bulk 
material storage. Beane has announced 



that the Chilean Nitrate Sales Corpora- 
tion has requested use of the entire 40,- 
000 sq. feet. 

The new warehouse will be equipped 
with a handling and distribution system 
powered by a center line belt 40 feet above 
the floor. The layout is adaptable to bulk 
materials other than nitrate and will sup- 
plement two other Heide & Company 
warehouses which now provide 80,000 sq. 
feet of space for bulk materials storage. 
The new structure has a capacity of 33,- 
000 tons, Beane said. 

(Continued on Page 21) 



Wholesale 



Retail 



FREEMAN BROTHERS 

SUPPLYING 

STEAMERS, FREIGHTERS, FISH BOATS 

FANCY and STAPLE GROCERIES . . . FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

HIGH GRADE MEATS and MEAT PRODUCTS 

MILK - CREAM - ICE - FISH 

FREE DELIVERY 

Phone 6-3115, 3116, 3117 — Morehead City, N. C. 



Canada Fir Enroute To N.C. 



When the Panamanian freighter Cnosa 
docks around Christmas at Wilmington 
with its cargo of Canadian fir it will 
mark the cheerful end of long negotiations 
and the beginning of a sustained water 
borne movement of lumber from the Pa- 
cific Coast. 

E. C. Sanders, president of the Tabor 
City Lumber Co., of Tabor City, N. C, 
said that the approximate 1,250,000 feet 
of fir and other lumber which the S. S. 
Cnosa brings is the first of a number of 
ships his company expects to bring into 
the Port of Wilmington at regular inter- 
vals during 1954. 

The N. C. State Ports Authority which 
has made lumber imports one of its main 
objectives, is purchasing straddle trucks 
and other equipment to handle the lumber 
over its docks. The SPA board has for 
consideration now a plan to provide the 
hard surfaced outdoor storage space to 
accomodate anticipated increased demands. 

A substantial tonnage of west coast 
lumber reaches North Carolina's mills and 
factories via transcontinental rail trans- 
port, and for the past two years a number 
of potential importers via intercoastal 



ships have shown an interest in bringing 
in lumber from the Northwest by this 
means. 

Steamship lines in the intercoastal trade 
have been unable to offer space for car- 
goes for South Atlantic ports in many in- 
stances. One reason is that shipments 
north of Cape Hatteras earn a substanti- 
ally higher rate than to Ports south of 
that point. Using foreign flag ships from 
Canadian ports is one answer to the prob- 
lem. It does not offer a solution, how- 
ever, to the problem of bringing in Cali- 
fornia and other west coast woods to the 
Carolinas where there is a demand. 

UMSTEAD 
(Continued from Page 5) 

I firmly believe that this State ports 
program is a sensible, progressive and 
far-reaching project for North Carolina. 
We have made great strides in many 
fields, such as education, health and fi- 
nancial growth and stability. It is my sin- 
cere belief that the promotion of our 
State ports will contribute to the sound, 
yet dynamic, growth of North Carolina. 



The Sprunt Corporation 



This business was founded in 1866 as 
Alexander Sprunt & Son, a partnership, 
dealing in Naval Stores and Cotton. In 
later years the business was incorporated 
and at the height of the cotton activi- 
ties during one year alone 425,000 bales 
were exported by the Sprunts through 
their Champion Compress Warehouses 
which was then operating all five of its 
cotton presses. 

During the year 1950 most of the older 
members of the organization wished to re- 
tire from the active cotton business and so 
sold the name and the cotton merchandiz- 
ing business to Alexander Sprunt & Son, 
Inc., of Memphis, Tennessee. This organi- 
zation is composed of Walter P. Sprunt, 
Jr., Hugh H. Sprunt, and Frank Doggrell, 
Jr. 

During the summer of 1953 while the 
original firm was operating as The Sprunt 
Corporation the individual members of 



Alexander Sprunt & Son, Inc., of Memphis, 
together with associates, purchased the 
entire stock of The Sprunt Corporation, 
which included all the properties known 
as The Ship Channel Compress Ware- 
house, at Houston, Texas, and the Cham- 
pion Compress Warehouse, at Wilmington, 
N. C. No change in name has been made 
by the new owners and the properties at 
Wilmington and Houston are now being 
actively operated by The Sprunt Corpora- 
tion. 

Present officers of The Sprunt Corpora- 
tion (A Delaware Corporation) are Wal- 
ter P. Sprunt, President, Walter P. Sprunt, 
Jr., Executive Vice President, Frank Dog- 
grell, Jr., Executive Vice President, Hugh 
H. Sprunt, Secretary & Treasurer. With 
additional officers at Wilmington, Charles 
B. Bergen, Assistant Secretary & Treas- 
urer, and Thomas F. Wood, Assistant Sec- 
retary. 



Portable Bag Units Added 



The movement of fertilizer materials 
which has made up a substantial part 
of the traffic handled in the Port of Wil- 
mington, and since last spring' through 
Morehead City, is expected to increase 
in both ports during- the coming- seasons. 
New bagging units are being- installed 
to facilitate the movement. 

The SPA Morehead City terminal suc- 
cessfully handled its first cargoes of bulk 
fertilizer from Western Germany earlier 
this year with Stevenson & Young- bring- 
ing in conveyoi-s and other equipment to 
handle the stevedoring of the movement. 
The materials moved out by A&EC to 
plants in Northeastern North Carolina. 

Due in early December at Morehead 
City from Houston is the S. S. Mae of the 
Bull Line under charter to the Mathei- 
son Chemical Corporation with 12,000 
tons of bulk fertilizer materials, all of 
which is to be bagged for distribution. 
The new bagging units ordered by SPA 
are portable types which can be moved 
rapidly from one compartment to anoth- 
er, and are expected to handle around 
350 tons in an eight-hour period. 

A small bagging' unit sufficient to 
handle rebagging- operations has been 



recommended for the state terminal at 
Wilmington where shipments of synthetic 
fertilizer from Europe are on schedule 
and other shipments, including the new 
Italian synthetics, are in prospect. 

New Scale House 




.„jss>-~* 



The latest type of concrete and aluminum 
scale house, located on the main rail line and 
roadway within the SPA terminal area at Wil- 
mington, has been completed by the Pyramid 
Construction Company. Capable of handling 
any port traffic, without time loss, the scale 
has been servicing a movement of cotton seed 
meal, sugar and other commodities. It was 
designed by Robert & Company of Atlanta. 




Short Run From Sailing Lanes Is Morehead City Feature 



Port- 




FROM MOREHEAD CITY 

To PANAMA - 

1542 NAUTICAL MILES 
U.S. A. 




Morehead City's geographical position on the Atlantic Coast is being emphasized by water- 
front interests as a feature to attract business to the recently improved facilities of the port. Prin- 
cipal docks of the harbor are less than four miles from the sea buoy, and the distance to the 
coastal sailing lanes is among the shortest runs on the entire coast. Distances from Morehead 
City to the ports of the world compare favorably. 



CARTERET TOWING CO., Inc. 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 




HARBOR AND 

INTERCOASTAL 

WATERWAY 

TOWING 

Rates on Request 

P. O. BOX 185 
PHONE 6-3292 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of Steamship Piers, 
Railroad Trestles and Bridges and Heavy Duty Flooring. 



GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK. N. Y. 



GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and to abrasion. It is particularly 
suitable for flooring, bulkheads, dolphins, rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State docks 
at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 



S. S. Southport with Bagging from India 




Part of a shipment of burlap from Calcutta being discharged from the British passenger- 
freighter M. V. Silveroak for the Wertheimer Bag Company of Wilmington. 



Movement of Burlap 
Scheduled for Port 

The S. S. Southport, the first freighter 
to dock at the SPA Wilmington terminal, 
(May 5, 1952) will return early in De- 
cember with this season's second part 
cargo of burlap for the Wertheimer Bag 
Company, S. L. Marbury, the firm's gen- 
eral manager, has announced. 

Other shipments of burlap from Cal- 
cutta, India, are scheduled by the com- 
pany in January and February, and plans 
for a regularly scheduled movement there- 
after of bagging material are in the form- 
ative stage, Asst. Mgr. W. G. Simpkins 
said. 

Wertheimer, established in Wilmington 
in 1935, supplies bagging for fertilizer 
plants, cottonseed oil mills, seed and feed 
companies; bagging for peanuts, potatoes, 
and burlap for North Carolina's furniture 
industry. The company's trade ai - ea is 
generally in the two Carolinas, Georgia 
and Virginia. 

Until recently, the supply of burlap was 
limited to the point where minimum ton- 
nages could not be guaranteed, and the 
Wertheimer supply was discharged at 
other ports except for occasional vessels 




Captain C. D. Maffitt, dean of Wilmington 
Steamship agents, and George Corke (right), of 
the Isthmian Steamship Company's traffic de- 
partment, call at the SPA's Wilmington termi- 
nal to discuss a movement of burlap. The first 
of a schedule of shipments is due early in 
December aboard the S. S. Southport. 

calling at the Port of Wilmington. Now, 
the shippers and their agents hope the 
movement of India burlap to North Caro- 
lina ports can be sustained with other 
commodities being added to the cargo of 
ships from Asiatic and Mediterranean 
ports. 



Cruise Ship Stockholm to Call at Morehead 




N. C. Medical Group 
Books Ocean Liner 
To Havana, Nassau 

The Trans-Atlantic liner M. S. Stock- 
holm of the Swedish-American Line, has 
been definitely booked to sail next October 
16 from the Port of Morehead City to in- 
augurate what backers hope will be a reg- 
ular passenger service from North Caro- 
lina ports to the Caribbean. 

J. D. Holt, SPA terminal manager at 
Morehead City, and officials of the Allen 
Travel Service, Inc., of New York, agents 
for the cruises, say their ultimate aim is 
six sailings a year by the Stockholm and 
a second unnamed liner. With the Cham- 
bers of Commerce of Kinston and More- 
head City, as well as other civic groups 



cooperating, tentative schedules have been 
set for other October sailings. Other sail- 
ings may be arranged for February and 
March of 1954 if sufficient bookings are 
obtained. 

The October 16 cruise will accommodate 
the sixth annual session of the North Caro- 
lina Academy of General Practice and ap- 
proximately 375 passengers are expected 
for the six-day voyage to Havana and 
Nassau. The Stockholm is the flag ship 
of the line and was built in 1951. The 450 
foot vessel has a capacity for more than 
500 passengers, but the cruises from More- 
head City will be limited to 375, it has 
been announced. 

H. H. Allen, president of the travel 
agency, said that North Carolinians have 
shown enthusiastic interest in the cruise 
plans, and that a number of other organi- 
zations have been contacted. The Stock- 



Forwarders F.M.B. Reg. No. 609 



W. O. SMITH & CO., INC. 

Established 1865 



"88 Years of Continuous 

Satisfactory Service'" 

• 

EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL 

FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



"The Complete Export Service" 
NEW YORK 4. N. Y.— 35 Water St. 

BALTIMORE 2. MD.— American Bldg. 



NORFOLK 10, Va.— Citizens Bank Bldg. 
NEW ORLEANS 12. LA.— Carondelet Bldg. 



"MOREHEAD CITY'S PIONEER FORWARDER." 



a 



60e\ 



During 1953 the Port of Morehead City 
handled its first export tobacco, but the op- 
eration moved smoothly last spring and now 
the winter movement is on with expansion 
plans in the air (Story page 22). 

A movement of U. S. Army troops trained 
in the use of atomic artillery and other 
secret weapons embarked from the Port of 
Wilmington last September and attracted in- 
ternational attention. Subsequent movements 
have been subject to closer security, and 
the cover picture shows military personnel 
moving from bus to transport with no inter- 
views for the press. (Story page 10). 



holm's itinerary provides for sightseeing 
trips ashore at both Havana and Nassau 
where the ship will remain overnight. 

The cruises will originate from the Port 
of Morehead City, the Stockholm sailing 
from New York empty and picking up all 
passengers from the North Carolina port. 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 




Member 

Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation 

WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



THE SPRUNT CORPORATION 

(Established 1866) 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Owners and Operators 

Champion Compress Warehouse Ship Channel Compress Warehouse 

Wilmington, N. C. Houston, Texas 

WAREHOUSING OF GENERAL COMMODITIES 

Specializing in Storage of 
COTTON, SUGAR AND TOBACCO 

Wilmington Offices, Warehouses and Docks 
Located at Foot of Walnut Street and Cape Fear River 



Telephones: 5281, 5282 



P. 0. Drawer: 960 



UN Cargo Moves To India 



The first United Nations shipment of 
relief supplies — 2,800,000 pounds of 
powdered milk — moved recently through 
the port of Wilmington to Baghdad, In- 
dia, as a part of the UN International 
Children's Emergency Fund drive to aid 
the undernourished of the Far East. 

The shipment went aboard the M. V. 
Silveroak which had brought burlap and 
eight graduate Indi- 
an student passeng- 
ers to enroll in Am- 
erican universities. 

The powdered milk 

was the first UN 

ra|p shipment to move 

J Wr' through a North 

m I Carolina port. The 

plus held by the Department of Agricul- 
ture and was packed in cartons heavily 
labeled as gifts from the USA. The move- 





ment was directed by R. E. Branson, chief 
of UNICEF's shipping section. 

While the vessel was in port it was 
visited by both white and Negro school 
children. A few of the youngsters from 
the Hallsboro School are shown (above) 
with cartons of the powdered milk. 



FUMIGATION TARIFF 

Available at the N. C. State Ports Au- 
thority Wilmington office is the newly 
published tariff giving rates and services 
of the new fumigation plant new ready 
for full operation. 



Three Vessels Take 
On Cotton Seed Meal 

Part cargoes of cotton seed meal, which 
the shippers had purchased through the 
Production and Marketing Administra- 
tion of the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, moved recently over the SPA 
docks at Wilmington for European ports. 

The Italian freighter S. S. Spiga; the 
S. S. Phillippe, L. D. of French registry, 
and the Finnish freighter S. S. Naviga- 
tor lifted the meal with the Wilmington 
Shipping Company as agents for the ship- 
pers. 

The cotton seed meal moved into the 
port via rail from points of surplus agri- 
cultural commodity storage at the same 
time similar shipments were being made 
through other South Atlantic and Gulf 
ports. Sources in touch with the move- 
ment have advanced the probability that 
additional tonnage of the surplus meal 
will move through North Carolina ports 
this winter. 




CONCRETE 
COMPANY 



2814 Monroe St. 

WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



Shipment of Steel 
From Europe Is Due 

American Hardware & Equipment Com- 
pany of Charlotte, N. C, are shippers of 
a part-cargo of steel products from Eu- 
ropean manufacturers due to reach the 
Port of Wilmington early in December, 
and the SPA terminal will again be used 
as a point of distribution, according to 
the firm's vice-president, R. L. Clemmer. 

The widely known Charlotte concern 
began using the new N. C. state docks 
last spring when its president, L. D. Nuch- 
ols, directed a shipment of barbed wire 
from Belgium to the new marine facili- 
ties on the Cape Fear. Enough wire to 
fence in both North and South Carolina 
were distributed through Wilmington aft- 
er the Isbrandtsen freighter M. V. Mer- 
wede discharged it with other steel cargo 
here. (Photo at right). 

The year-end shipment of nails will 
very likely be the forerunner of an ex- 
panded movement of foreign steel im- 
ports which executives of American Hard- 
ware now anticipate will begin early next 
spring. 




Jerry Schumacher 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

• 

411 Evans Street 
Morehead City, N. C. 

Phone 6-4730 



Our Morehead City Office Offers... 


Complete Banking Service 


for Every Particular Need 


Condensed Statement - 


-September 30, 1953 


RESOURCES 


LIABILITIES 


Cash in Vaults and Due from 

Banks $41,165,347.91 


Capital Stock $ 1,250,000.00 

Surplus 7 500 000 00 


U. S. Government 

Securities $44,029,748.58 

Obligations of Fed- 
eral Agencies 
& Other Mar- 
ketable Securi- 
ties 21,190,543.53 


Undivided Profits 780,258.68 

Reserve Account — Accrued & 
Unearned Interest, Insur- 
ance, Taxes & Other Re- 
serves 7,662,984.71 




State Bonds 10,802,088.07 
Municipal Bonds 16,057,580.91 


92,079,961.09 

Accrued Interest 585,686.80 

Loans and Discounts 79,135,573.06 

Banking Houses, Furniture and 

Equipment 1,594,945.97 


Inter-Branch Clearings 2,298,909.62 

DEPOSITS 195,069,361.82 


$214,561,514.83 


$214,561,514.83 


MEMBER OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 


First-Citizens Bank & Trust Company 

North Carolina 



Wilmington Shipping 
Opens Office at SPA 

A suite of four offices has been added 
to the N. C. State Ports Authority ad- 
ministration build- 
ing' at Wilmington 
to accomodate the 
Wilmington Ship- 
ping' Company, one 
of the state's best 
known steamship 
agencies and water- 
front operators. 

Offices and ware- 
houses operated by 
the firm in the up- 
per Wilmington har- 
bor were destroyed Peter B. Ruffin 
by fire last March, and temporary quar- 
ters have been provided on the SPA docks 
until the new office space could be con- 
structed. 

The company has for many years serv- 
ed as agents for a number of steamship 
lines serving- the North Carolina ports. 




The Wilmington Shipping Company are 
also stevedores, customs house brokers 
and freight forwarders, and have been 
agents for many of the vessels and ship- 
pers which have utilized the state docks 
here and at Morehead City during the 
first year of SPA operations. 

Officers of the firm include Peter B. 
Ruffin, president; William P. Emerson, 
vice-president; W. D. Williams, secretary, 
and J. B. Wilson, treasurer. Other mem- 
bers of the organization are W. H. Pierce 
and L. H. Trulove. 

Recently the company added new lift 
trucks to its equipment which includes 
forklifts, tractors and trailers used in 
stevedoring and warehouse handling op- 
erations. 

USDA Visitors At Port 

S. D. Whitfield, New York, area su- 
pervisor, and R. W. Nicaise, Charleston, 
plant quantatine inspector, Bureau of En- 
tomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA, 
were late November visitors to the Port 
of Wilmington to look over the new fumi- 
gation plant at the SPA terminal. 



Atkinson Dredging Co, 



Home Office 
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. 



Field Office 

R. F. D. 3, Box 234 

NORFOLK, VA. 




D. D. ATKINSON. B. S. E.. president 

Member Society Naval Architects and Marine Engineers 

Associate Member American Society Mechanical Engineers 



Channel Dredging 
Fill Dredging 
Bulkheads 
Wharf Construction 



Editor Pays Brief Visit 

E. Howard Bennett, editor of America's 
Textile Reporter, paid a brief visit by air 
to Wilmington recently, including the port 
in a tour of other North Carolina points. 
He predicted that a major part of the 
woolen and worsted industry of New Eng- 
land will eventually move south because 
of lower taxes, better labor situations, and 
the need for modern plants. 

HEIDE BUILDS 
(Continued from Page 11) 

The company is prepared, its executive 
said, to expand its facilities to meet fu- 
ture demand for additional storage space 
for bulk cargo, but that no general cargo 
storage is contemplated. In past years the 
movement of Chilean nitrate into the Port 
of Wilmington has aggregated between 
70,000 and 150,000 tons a year, and was 
handled by the Wilmington Terminal 
Warehouse Company and the Wilmington 
Shipping Company before the disastrous 
fire of last spring which destroyed five 
up-river warehouses. 

SPA HEAD 
(Continued from Page 9) 

commercial fertilizer companies. Vice- 
Chairman Raymond A. Bryan, of Golds- 
boro, President of T. A. Loving Construc- 
tion Company, lends his wide experience 
to the agency on its expansion plans and 
major dock improvement projects. 

Secretary-Treasurer W. Avery Thomp- 
son, President of J. E. Thompson Lumber 
Company, Hallsboro, is directing his ef- 
forts to promote the export and import of 
logs and lumber, as is Harold F. Coffey, 
President of Kent-Coffey Manufacturing 
Company, Lenoir, N. C. The latter is seek- 
ing to interest other furniture manufac- 
turers in the importation of veneers and 
foreign lumber through Tarheel ports. 

J. Harry White, retired tobacco com- 
pany executive of Winston-Salem, has con- 
centrated on the expansion of tobacco 
movements through Morehead City and 
Wilmington, and has personally solicited 
his wide contacts in this field. 

The sixth SPA member, Harvey W. 
Moore of Charlotte, is President of the 
Brown Manufacturing Company of Con- 
cord, and the Roberta Manufacturing 
Company, Cabarrus County. 



CAPE FEAR 

TOWING COMPANY 

MARINE CONSTRUCTION 




WILMINGTON, N. C. 

Foot of Chestnut Street 



T. A. LOVING 

AND 

COMPANY 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



Goldsboro, 
North Carolina 



MAJOR LEAF EXPORT MOVES 
LOOM FOR MOREHEAD CITY 



The German freighter S. S. Gloria, 
which recently sailed from Morehead 
City's SPA docks with a winter cargo of 
Carolina tobacco for Western Europe, is 
scheduled to return early in 1954 for the 
New Year's first shipment of leaf for the 
continent -- a year almost certain to 
bring major developments to Morehead 
City as a tobacco export center. 

Another German vessel, the S. S. Ludolf 
Oldendorff, initiated the movement of to- 
bacco to Europe during the first spring 
the expanded Morehead City ocean termi- 
nal was in operation. Since that occasion, 
land transportation, rail, and truck rates 
on tobacco have been adjusted favorably 
for the port, and plans to increase the 
terminal's tobacco storage capacity are 
well advanced. 

W. 0. Smith & Company, of New York, 
have pioneered the tobacco forwarding 
through Morehead City, with its vice-pres- 
ident, H. A. Byrne, personally supervis- 
ing each shipment through the port. Co- 
operating in the movement have been 
many of North Carolina's best known to- 
bacco exporting firms which are now ad- 
vocating the construction of storage fa- 
cilities to accommodate a minimum of 25,- 
000 hogsheads with provisions for ex- 
pansion. Some advise 50,000 storage. 

A survey recently conducted by SPA 
Traffic Manager E. E. Lee, Jr., and More- 
head City SPA Terminal Manager J. D. 
Holt revealed that an impressive number 
of North Carolina's leaf exporters not 
only endorse the plan for expanded stor- 
age space but are ready to commit defi- 
nite volumes of tobacco for shipside ware- 
housing. 

The North Carolina Ports Authority 
has had under consideration for some time 
the recommendation of its executive di- 
rector, G. W. Gillette, for 400,000 sq. ft. 
of additional commodity storage space 
divided equally between the state marine 
terminals at Morehead City and Wilming- 
ton. The SPA board now has under con- 
sideration plans for financing warehous- 
ing for both ports. 




E. L. Bickle. Imperial Tobacco Company ex- 
ecutive, (left) and Mrs. Bickle are Port of Wil- 
mington visitors during the winter tobacco 
movement. With them on the SPA docks are 
SPA Director Gillette and Peter B. Ruffin. of 
the Wilmington Shipping Company. 

Imperial Tobacco Co. 
Increases Movement 

Imperial Tobacco Company, Ltd., in- 
creased its late 1953 movement of tobacco 
through the Port of Wilmington three- 
fold over the volume it had stored and 
shipped through the port last spring, rec- 
ords show, with five vessels loading from 
2,100 to more than 5,000 hogsheads for 
the company during the past year. 

E. L. Bickle, rej^resentative of the com- 
pany in the United States with headquar- 
ters in Richmond, Va., was a recent visi- 
tor at the new SPA terminals, and ex- 
pressed satisfaction with the expeditious 
manner in which the movement has been 
handled. The Wilmington Shipping Com- 
pany is Wilmington agent for the com- 
pany. 



It's all right always to know what to 
say, you don't always have to say it. 

— Good Business. 




HEIDE & CO., Inc. 

LICENSED CUSTOM HOUSE BROKERS 
STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 

Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Samplers — Sworn Weighers 



WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 

Registration No. 223 

CABLE ADDRESS "HEIDE" WILMINGTON - CAROLINA 
Tel. 35161 



Complete Banking Services . . . 

Serving .... 

Eastern North Carolina For 
Over Half A Century .... 

We offer you Import and Export Letters of Credit . . . 
Foreign Exchange, Draft or Cable . . . Travelers Cheques 
and Letters of Credit. 

Peoples Savings Bank £ Trust Co, 

Established 1900 
Wilmington, Ncuth, Carolina * ' 



Me in b 



Member Federal Reserve System , ... 
er Federal Deposit ~Ihsnr(Cȣe\ Garpohitmir 

• .<••* • * • I i ■ 



JKJRTH U.BOilM STATE JJWtXt 
RA.LEIGH, NX. 



Sec. 34.66. P. 


L. & R. 


U. S. Postage 


PAID 




Wilmington. 


N. C. 


Permit No. 


225 



Wilmington's Upper Harbor 









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Route Through Wilmington 



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Check Rates ana Services toil 

BUREAU OF RATES, 
NDUSTRY AND COM, 





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Wilmington, N. C. 
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IORTH 
CAROLINA 







We're rolling out 
the Carpet! 



That's just another way of 
saying that we're doing some- 
thing to make our communities 
more attractive to you as pos- 
sible plant sites. It means that 
the people in our service area 
want new industries and are of- 
fering more than basic require- 
ments. 

Under our Finer Carolina 
Program, more than 1400 proj- 
ects have been completed, such 
as swimming pools and libra- 
ries — hospital additions and 
Little League Baseball fields — 
expanded municipal facilities 
and family picnic areas. You 
name it — they've done it, 
when it comes to building a 
finer community in which to 
work, live and play. Such peo- 
ple make highly productive em- 
ployees — loyal, hardworking, 
civic-minded. The kind you can 
count on to put a PLUS FAC- 
TOR in your profit equation. 

For further information on 
these Carolinians and Sites in 
our service area, just write, 
wire or phone our Area De- 
velopment Dept. On your re- 
quest, we'd be happy to send 
you the FREE 24 page summary 
of Carolinians at work in the 
Finer Carolina Program. 

Area Development Department 

CAROLINA 

POWER & LIGHT 

COMPANY 

Raleigh North Carolina 




Little League Baseball Project 




Community Swimming Pool 




Clearing Family Picnic Area 



IP- 



WORTH 
CAROLINA 

PORTS 




Official Publication N. C. S. P. A. 

January, 1954 — Vol. 1, No. 2 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

Chairman Edwin Pate 

Vice-Chairman Raymond A. Bryan 

Secretary-Treasurer W. Avery Thompson 

Member J. Harry White 

Member Harvey W. Moore 

Member Harold F. Coffey 

Executive Director 

COL. RICHARD S. MARR 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

H. V. Conly Asst. to Director 

E. E. Lee, Jr. Traffic Manager 

H. N. Larcombe Com'l. Rep. 

Frank C. Adams Public Relations 

WILMINGTON OFFICE 

P. O. Box 1048 — Telephone 3-1622 

Philip L. Sullivan Terminal Mgr. 

MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

P. O. Box 145 — Telephone 6-3159 

J. D. Holt Terminal Mgr. 

Camden P. Fessant Assistant 



The Cover 



A truck load of Tarheel tobacco oblig- 
ingly parked on the approach to the brand 
new fumigating plant at the SPA Wilming- 
ton terminal to provide the inset picture. At 
the top is a better view of the new plant. 

The lower view is of the busy state docks 
at the Port of Morehead City. A cargo of 
new type fertilizer and nitrate of soda is 
being discharged by the S. S. Mae. 




FROM THE GULF 

I have received the December issue of 
your publication and I want to thank you 
for having placed my name on the mail- 
ing' list. If this is a fair sample of what 
the publication will be in the future, then 
certainly it is one in which the N. C. State 
Ports Authority may take great pride. 

Being a "Tarheel" myself (born in Mur- 
phy), I have a great interest in news of 
any kind from the Old North State and 
I shall look forward with pleasure to con- 
tinuing to receive your magazine. 

Please accept my congratulations and 
my best wishes for success. 

Nicholas Pattern, Gen. Mgr. 
Houston Port and 
Traffic Bureait 



ADVERTISERS NOTE 

I'd like to take this occasion to send 
along a few words of glowing praise on 
"North Carolina Ports", December 1953 
issue. The book certainly far exceeds any- 
thing I was expecting as a first issue and 
the editorial coverage is excellent, rang- 
ing through broad policy aspects to op- 
erations, cargo and facilities, and present- 
ing a lively picture of action at the port, 
which is of course the strongest thing an 
external house organ of this kind can do. 

I also note a surprising amount of firm 
advertising support for the effort, betok- 
ening a lively interest among the support- 
ing services and accessorial facilities. This 
is important to the overall impression 
gained by the reader as shown in the pri- 
vate business interests of the port strong- 
ly behind the state effort. 

Paul A. Amundsen, 
Editor and Publisher 
World Ports 



NORTH CAROLINA PORTS especially 
acknowledges with thanks the comments 
and suggestions of Editor David A. How- 
ard of the Port of Jacksonville's SEA- 
FARER, and the most helpful and en- 
couraging observations of Former SPA 
Chairman A. G. Myers of Gastonia. 



Madjo Island Gas Terminal 
Expands Morehead Harbor 

A new 18 acre high test avaition and jet fuel terminal of 600,000 bar- 
rel capacity has begun operation, even before completion on Radio Island 
within the Morehead City-Beaufort harbors area, and its annual thru-put 
is expected to swell the port's petroleum movement by 3,600,000 barrels 
a year. 



The installation, which will accomodate 
tank ships, barges, tank trucks, and rail- 
road tank cars, forshadows the industrial 
development of the Radio Island channel 
sites abutting the highway and railroad 
causeway connecting Morehead City and 
Beaufort. The new terminal is directly 
across deep water from the State Ports 
Authority marine facilities where the Es- 
so Standard Oil Company leases a wharf 
and plant site for extensive operations. 

Aviation Fuel Terminals, Inc., are own- 
ers and developers of the property which 
will be operated by the firm under a 
lease agreement with the Armed Services 
Petroleum Purchasing Agency, with the 
present capacity of the plant earmarked 
for the growing U. S. Marine Cherry 
Point Air Base. T. A. Loving Construc- 
tion Company of Goldsboro, N. C. are the 
contractors and the 10 tanks to be in- 
stalled, pipe lines, piers, truck and rail 
loading platforms and the dock are due 
for completion early in 1954. 

The first tanker to dock at the new fa- 
cility discharged its high octane cargo 
just before Christmas after the completion 
of the first two 80,000 barrel tanks. Still 
under construction are two additional 

The new $1,500,000 aviation fuel terminal 
includes a dock, pipe line system, ten storage 
tanks, loading facilities for tank cars and tank 
trucks as well as a laboratory for testing jet 
fuel and high octane gasoline. 



tanks of 80,000 capacity; four of 55,- 
000 and two of 30,000 barrel capacity. 
The office building has been completed 
and other facilities include a laboratory, 
pump house, tool rooms and storage space. 
T-2 type tankers will bring in the fuel 
from Gulf and other refineries, it is an- 
ticipated, and the company expects an 
average of six "put throughs" a year to 
bring the volume handled to around 3,- 
600,000 barrels. The first tanker to dock 
at the new terminal was the U. S. N. S. 
Mission Capistrano. 

The loading platforms will accomodate 
four truck transports and four rail tank 
cars simultaneously and the rail traffic 
will move over the Beaufort-Morehead 
City Railroad and the Atlantic and East 





.JLuiJLiMjJ. 



^/tH^fMWHnINt* 4V.: 



Carolina Railroad to Cherry Point. The 
Marine Air Base can also be reached by 
barge on the Inland Waterway. 

The new terminal will be operated by 
Aviation Fuel Terminals personnel with 
the U. S. Navy maintaining an inspection 
officer at the plant. Officers of the firm 
are R. E. Bryan, President; R. A. Bryan, 
Vice-President; and C. B. McNairy, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer. Post Office addresses 
of the firm are Beaufort, N. C. and P. 0. 
Box 989, Goldsboro, N. C. G. L. Bennett 
is terminal manager. 



40,000 Tons Nitrate 
Expected In January 

The S. S. Maria Parodi on January 1 
arrived to discharge the first of a heavy 
movement of bulk fertilizer to Heide & 
Company's new $600,000 storage ware- 
house which the firm took under lease 
from the Seaboard Air Line Railroad on 
completion New Year's Day. 

W. S. R. Beane, company executive, 
said that cargoes, aggregating at least 
40,000 tons, will be discharged at the 
new facility during January, and that 
additional shipments are due before the 
end of the season which ends in June. In 
past years the movement of Chilean ni- 
trate into the Port of Wilmington has 
averaged from 80 to 110 thousand tons. 
The handling of Chilean nitrate in Wil- 
mington harbor was interrupted last 
March when bulk handling space and 
equipment was destroyed by a disastrous 
waterfront fire. 

Heide & Company will also bring in a 
6,000 ton cargo of bagged calcium amoni- 
um nitrate in January and will steve- 
doi'e the shipment through the N. C. State 
Ports Authority terminal at Wilmington. 




The U. S. N. S. Mission Capistrano was the 
first tanker to berth at the new aviation fuel 
terminal. On hand to greet her were Terminal 
Manager Bennett, J. D. Holt of the N. C. State 
Ports Authority; Joe DuBois, Morehead City 
Chamber of Commerce manager, and R. E. 
Bryan, president of Aviation Fuel Terminal, 
Inc. The new terminal expects to handle 3,- 
600,000 barrels of jet fuel and high octane 
aviation fuel this year. 

Dredging Work For Both 
N. C. Port Channels Due 

Preliminary planning including surveys 
for shoals and the restoration of ocean 
bar channels is underway by the Wilming- 
ton district office of the Corps of Engi- 
neers and dredging work is expected to 
get underway shortly in both the Cape 
Fear River and the Morehead City area. 

The ocean going dredge Gerig is due 
in February from Savannah for work 
at the Southport crossing on the Cape 
Fear and deepening the bar channel to 
authorized depth of 32 feet. The hopper 
dredge Lyman is scheduled for work on 
the bar channel at the entrance to More- 
head City harbor also in February. The 
channel is to be restored to a width of 
400 feet and a depth of 30 feet. 



-A^j^^i^dNerf 




Trade Reviva 



If the North Carolina ports succeed 
in reviving their long-lapsed lumber im- 
port trade it will be due entirely to the 
long and unlagging efforts of a sizable 
number of not easily discouraged inter- 
ests who have cooperated to give the 
movement an encouraging start. 

For the first time since the beginning 
of World War II a significant shipment 
of lumber from the Pacific Coast is being 
distributed from dockside storage on the 
Cape Fear to a consuming area radiating 
from Wilmington to points in North and 
South Carolina. Aside from Greenhart 
logs and timbers from South America, 
it is the first foreign wood movement 
handled by the North Carolina State 
Ports. 

The shippers are E. C. Sanders and Guy 
Hughes, President and Vice-President of 
the Tabor City (N. C.) Lumber Company, 
and the part cargo of Canadian Douglas 
fir and hemlock which the S. S. Conosa 
discharged the week following Christmas, 
is the first shipment of a water-bourne 
movement of West Coast and foreign lum- 
ber the company plans to establish as 
part of its already extensive operations. 

For more than a year, the Tabor City 
executives worked to obtain shipping 

The three pictures at left were sent from 
Vancouver and show deck loading of the S. S. 
Cnosa, the vessel at the wharf and J. B. Grin- 
nell (left). United States department manager 
for Seaboard Lumber Sales Co., Ltd., as he 
entrusts a totem pole to Capt. Seretis for pas- 
sage to Wilmington. Below is a construction 
scene where two acres of new paved outdoor 
storage space is being rushed in anticipation 
of a revived lumber import trade. 




ftth Pacific Coast Is Seen 



space on intercoastal steamers; a supply 
of lumber which would find a ready de- 
mand in this market area, and to iron out 
the problems attending the first test run 
into the Port of Wilmington. 

In their efforts the shippers had the 
aid of SPA's staff which has long sought 
to stimulate lumber imports. It had met, 
however, with the same lack of success 
in obtaining commitments from American 
steamship lines, although a heavy demand 
for California redwood, Philippine ma- 
hogany and other Pacific lumber exists 
in the territory served by the ports. Mil- 
lions of feet of these types of lumber are 
shipped by rail into the area annually 
from the West Coast, from New Orleans 
and ports to the north. 

Canadian sources were found to be the 
answer, and the Seaboard Lumber Sales 
Company, Ltd., of Vancouver, B. C, with 
Wilford & McKay, Inc., ship operators, 
cooperated to bring a part cargo into 
North Carolina to initiate the movement. 

When the Cnosa docked rain lent a gloomy- 
outlook to unloading operations, but the ship- 
pers, SPA operating personnel and the Wil- 
mington Shipping Company, stevedores, were 
ready with the best available equipment, and 
the discharge preceeded apace despite con- 
tinuous wet weather. Principals involved ex- 
pressed general satisfaction with the operation, 
and Wilmington gave the ship a warm wel- 
come. 



Wilmington Shipping Company, were 
agents for the vessel and stevedored the 
shipment. 

To support the program, the State Ports 
Authority purchased special equipment in- 
cluding straddle trucks, and paved two 
additional acres of open storage to ac- 
comodate the movement. Wet weather 
prevented the completion of the new stor- 
age area before the Cnosa's arrival, but 
concrete aprons in the warehouse and 
transit areas were successfully utilized. 

In this group are from the left J. K. Sloat, 
Seaboard Lumber Sales Company; G. A. Hoop- 
er, vice-president, Wilford & McKay, Inc.; Guy 
Hughes, vice-president, and E. C. Sanders, 
president. Tabor City Lumber Co.; J. G. Thorn- 
ton, president, Wilmington Savings & Trust Co., 
and Col. G. W. Gillette. In uniform is Capt. 
N. S. Seretis. 








1 v r >. ah 



WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 
SHIPPER. MANUFACTURER 

Take A Good Look at N. C.'s Major Port, Offering You . . . 

• Excellent Transportation Facilities 
• Abundant Skilled Labor 
• Civic Cooperation 

Get Your Job Done! 

Cheek Rates, Services and 
Shipping Information with: 

BUREAU OF RATES 

INDUSTRY AND 

COMMERCE 

P. O. BOX 604 
H. M. NICHOLSON, Director 




HEIDE & CO., Inc. 

LICENSED CUSTOM HOUSE BROKERS 
STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 

Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Samplers — Sworn Weighers 



^COCO'S AGe <Vc> 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 223 

CABLE ADDRESS "HEIDE" WILMINGTON - CAROLINA 
Tel. 35161 



Test Run of Bulk Cargo 

Puts SPA Through Paces 

A test run of a full 11,000 ton cargo of bulk fertilizer material (see cover) origi- 
nating on the Houston, Texas, ship channel and Lake Charles, La., in December saw 
SPA's Morehead City terminal handle its first stevedoring operation to pilot similar 
movements through the port in the future. 

The Bull Line's freighter, S. S. Mae, brought in the first cargo of the Mathieson 
Chemical Corporation's pellet type, complete fertilizer, from its Pasadena, Texas, 
plant, and nitrate of soda from Lake Charles for distribution by barge, Atlantic and 
East Carolina Railroad and truck to plants and agencies in the heavily consuming area 
served by the port. 

A heavy percentage of the material is being bagged for the shipper with new 
portable equipment purchased by the State Ports Authority to initiate a more complete 
service for bulk materials moving into its terminal. Part of the cargo may move to the 
Standard Fertilizer plant at Williamston by inland waterway barge. 

The S. S. Mae, designed somewhat on the order of Great Lakes ore vessels, has 
five hatches and carries no ships tackle for unloading its cargo. J. D. Holt, SPA 
terminal manager, leased mobile cranes and employed the terminal's hoppers, con- 
veyors and payloaders to discharge the vessel. He and Cameron P. Fessant, assistant 
manager, undertook the stevedoring with the International Longshoremen's Asso- 
ciation at Morehead City furnishing the dock and warehouse labor. K. C. Winter, 
maritime superintendent for Mathieson, supervised the operation for the shippers. 

The discharge of the cargo of the Mae emphasized the need at Morehead City 
for the latest type of bulk unloading equipment if the port is to develop its 
full potentialities as a fertilizer distribution point. The state agency now has 
under consideration the purchase of such 
equipment, it was pointed out. 




In the group at the left are E. E. Lee, Jr., 
SPA traiiic manager; C. P. Fessant, (center) 
with Jack Holt at right. The latter donned work 
clothes for a week to push the operation. The 
man in the white coveralls is C. K. Winter, 
of the Mathieson Chemical Corporation and 
below are views of the transit shed operation 
and in the ship's hold. Stevedoring of the bulk 
cargo of the S. S. Mae was undertaken by 
State Ports Authority personnel. 




/ 




Major Dock Repairs Begun 



A construction prog-ram designed to 
put the old docks at SPA's Morehead City 
terminal into top condition is getting un- 
derway this month and may have an ul- 
timate cost of $326,000. 

A basic contract of $229,000 was ap- 
proved by the State Ports Authority board 
last Fall with an alternate provision to 
extend the contract to include repairs to 
slip No. 1 at a cost of an additional $97,- 
000. Wannamaker & Wells, Orangeburg, 
S. C, are the general contractors for the 
project, and Henry von Oesen, of Wil- 
mington, is the engineer. 

All of the repairs will be concerned 
with the old Ocean Terminal constructed 
in 1936 by the Morehead City Port Com- 
mission and taken over by SPA in 1950. 
These wharves join the new steel, con- 
crete docks of the new terminal construct- 
ed at a cost of approximately $2,500,000 
and completed in 1952. 

Advance stages of corrosion of the steel 
bulkhead above the mean low water line 
and damage caused by ships through the 
years have made the repairs necessary, 
von Oesen said. Considerable fill has been 
lost, and as a result there is a settlement 
of the dock and the tracks. Describing the 
extensive project the engineer said: 

"Several methods of attempting to re- 
pair the steel were studied, and it was 
finally determined that a concrete cap 
wall would provide the best and most 



serviceable repair method considered. 

"New construction will consist of the 
concrete cap-wall, a series of new steel 
piling and wales against the lower front 
portion of the steel bulkhead to reinforce 
it for deeper draughts in the slip." 




CONCRETE 
COMPANY 



2814 Monroe St. 

WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



The Wilmington Savings & Trust Co. 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

''North Carolina's Port Bank" 



Capital 
$300,000 



♦ 



Surplus 
$1,000,000 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 

and 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 

A Symbol of Service mid Progress Since 1888 



New SPA Director Plans 
All Out Drive For 1954 



North Carolina's State Ports Authori- 
ty, with Col. Richard S. Marr at the helm 
as it's new administrative head, has set 
its course on a new phase of operations 
calculated to expand its area of business 
soliction and ports developement this year. 

Colonel Marr was unanimously elected 
SPA excutive director at the close of 
1953, and at the same meeting- the SPA 
board, with the new director concurring, 
indicated that an aggressive campaign 
to attract new business and steamship 
services will be the keynote for 1954. 

Chairman Edwin Pate and Colonel Man- 
told news and press association men that 
an early decision to establish branch of- 
fices in the East and mid-West to put 
the Tarheel ports in a more favorable 
competitive position with other Atlantic- 
ports can be expected. SPA board mem- 
bers also generally expressed the opinion 
that available funds should be used with- 
out delay to employ additional specialized 
personnel to help implement a program 
of stepped-up solicitation throughout the 
territory served by the Ports of Wil- 
mington and Morehead City. 

In its determination to concentrate on 
an intensive market development cam- 
paign, SPA will be following a concept 
frequently expressed by Gov. William B. 
Umstead who has publicly urged more 
concentration on ports promotion since 
he took office a year ago. 

Colonel Marr retired from the U. S. 
Army in November and brings to the 
SPA directorship a broad experience in 
key administration positions both in this 
country and abroad. His staff and com- 
bat assignments have been largely con- 
cerned in the fields of transportation, log- 




Colonel Richard S. Marr 

istics, public relations, personnel, con- 
struction and purchasing together with 
missions of a diplomatic nature. 

The new director began his military 
career in 1923 when he was commis- 
sioned directly from the University of 
Illinois where he was an honor student. 
He has held the rank of full colonel since 
1944, and his assignments of duty in re- 
cent years have ranged from the great 
(Continued on Page Seventeen) 











o. 


E. 

SHIP 


DURANT 

CHANDLER 














PROVISIONS. 


DECK. 


ENGINEERS. & STEWARDS SUPPLIES 








Columbian 


Rope — 


Interne 


itional 


Paint & Socony-Vacuum 


Oil 


Co., 


Inc. 




Teleph 


sne 


4232 








Water 


and 


Market 


Streets 








WILMINGTON. 


NORTH CAROLINA 











CP&L Plant to Afford Por 



Next summer will see the Wilmington area reverse its power position 
from one of importing its electric requirements to one not only of meeting 
its own needs but of exporting a considerable surplus of electric energy. 

The about-face will occur when Caro- = 

line Power & Light Company begins op- 
erating- the first 150,000-horsepower unit 
of the generating plant it is building near 
Wilmington. About a year later, a sec- 
ond 150,000-horsepower unit will be add- 
ed, multiplying still further the electricity 
available for export. 

First call upon this huge new source 
of electric power, of course, will be the 



consumers nearest at hand. Like recent 
port developments, the area's power posi- 
tion improves its opportunities for further 
industrialization. 

Construction of the CP&L plant on the 
lower Cape Fear is a significant step 
forward in the current story of progress 
for the traditional old port city of Wil- 
mington, once the largest city in North 



GOLDSBORO 




Surplus of Electric Energy 



Carolina and the cultural center of the 
State. 

The Carolina Power & Light Company 
extended its service territory to the coast, 
including also the port of Morehead City, 
on March 1, 1952, by the merger of the 
former Tide Water Power Company into 
its system. This added 5:5,000 electric 
customers living in an area of 8,000 
square miles. 

CP&L immediately cut the rate charged 
for electricity by over $800,000 a year 
and instituted promotional rates to en- 
courage the use of more power. Nine 
months later, it broke ground for a new 
plant. 

Tide Water Power Company had serv- 
ed principally as an electric distributor, 
purchasing most of its power at whole- 
sale from the Carolina Power & Light 
Company. The new Wilmington power 
plant will be capable of generating a third 
more electric energy with its first unit 
than the entire Tide Water territory now 
uses, and completion of the second unit 
in mid-1955 will double this supply of 
electricity. The immediate Wilmington 
area (including the beaches and Burgaw) 

North Carolina's port cities enjoy abundant 
electric power, as indicated by the high-volt- 
age transmission lines on this map. At the 
point indicated along the Cape Fear River 
above Wilmington. Carolina Power & Light 
Company is building a big generating plant 
which will produce far in excess of local needs. 
When it goes into operation this summer, these 
lines will be exporting rather than importing 
elorir'c energy. 





FUN AREA AT CP&L SITE 

consumes about .'55' /, of the electric en- 
ergy required in the eastern division. 

It is significant that one of the boilers 
being installed at the plant is a product 
of Babcock and Wilcox, which recently 
established a plant at Wilmington and 
has since announced that it plans to double 
this plant's capacity. 

Wilmington Grows 

These are significant straws in the 
wind that seems to be blowing more busi- 
ness toward Wilmington. Reigel Caro- 
lina Corporation has established a multi- 
million-dollar plant at nearby Acme. Tim- 
me Corporation has established a big new 
textile plant just outside the city. The 
State Ports Authority has spent $7,500,000 
for improvement of Wilmington and More- 
head City's port facilities, and the fed- 
eral government is establishing a gigan- 
tic shell-loading depot a few miles south 
of the city. 

"We are keeping faith with the people 
who were instrumental in effecting a 
merger of the Tide Water Power Com- 
pany with Carolina Power & Light Com- 
pany," commented Louis V. Sutton of Ra- 
leigh, president of the latter company, on 
the occasion of the ground-breaking. "It 
is also an expression of our faith in the 
future of this area." 

Industrial growth in the area strongly 
indicates now that this faith will be jus- 
tified by increased demand for electric 
energy from the big plant. 



SPA Opens Warehouses 

To Cooperative Tobacco 

An initial movement of Flue Cured Cooperative Tobacco Corporation 
leaf, which may expedite the expansion of state marine terminal at Wil- 
mington, crammed SPA warehouse space in December and January to await 
export and domestic assignment. 



The storage commitment, limited by 
SPA to 10,000 hogsheads, which would 
run in value at between five and six mil- 
lion dollars, is expected to bring a wel- 
comed increase in terminal operating rev- 
enues, and to supply a realistic basis 
for back storage demand. Some of the 
stored tobacco may also move through 
the terminal's new fumigating plant be- 
fore shipment overseas. 

The contract with the Cooperative grew 
out of discussions begun last Spring when 
its general manager, L. T. Weeks, asked 
the State Ports Authority Board to con- 
sider expanding its storage facilities to 
accomodate between 30 and 40 thousand 
hogsheads. He held out the possibility the 
volume offered for storage would run 
appreciable beyond that figure if capacity 
was available. 

Caravans oi tobacco trucks from inland cen- 
ters have been lining the approach roads to 
SPA's main Wilmington warehouse as thous- 
ands of hogsheads entered storage awaiting 
export or redistribution. Here is one early 
morning line up. 



SPA now has under consideration a 
general plan for building additional stor- 
age at both Wilmington and Morehead 
City, and a tentative figure of 400,000 
square feet at each terminal has been 
discussed. Business leaders and bankers 
in the Wilmington area have indicated 
they will support the financing of addi- 
tional tobacco storage in their port, and 
almost a score of tobacco exporting firms 
have endorsed the plan for additional ex- 
port tobacco storage at SPA's Morehead 
City terminal or in that general area. 

In this group are E. C. Dobson. SPA ware- 
house superintendent (left), with M. Pope and 
C. C. Scott of the Flue-Cured Tobacco Coopera- 
tive Stabilization Corporation. The trio are 
looking over the new state-owned fumigating 
plant built to handle \ohnrro and imported 
cotton, among other commodities. 




New Tobacco Rates 
Put Morehead City 
In Favorable Light 

The ambition of the Port of Morehead 
City to develop into an important tobacco 
export center has made headway with the 
approval of more favorable rail rates from 
many of the producing' points within the 
tobacco territory. 

Recent action by the Southern Freight 
Association in approving proposals for ad- 
justments of rates to the port results in 
giving Morehead City rates for tobacco 
equal to and, in some instances, lower 
than rates to other Atlantic seaports. 
Truck rates had previously been adjusted. 

The history of the campaign for more 
advantageous rates is contained in a sum- 
mary by a spokesman for the Port of 
Morehead City: 

"In the Fall of 1952 the Atlantic & East 
Carolina Railway submitted a proposal 
to the Southern Freight Association for 
the adjustment of rates on tobacco in 
hogsheads from principal redrying points 
to the Port of Morehead City for export. 
At that time, the only rates on tobacco 
into Morehead City were Exception Class 
rates, much higher than rates into Hamp- 
ton Roads Ports and Wilmington. The 
Atlantic & East Carolina Railway pro- 
posal was turned down. As a result, when 
it appeared that a cargo would move 
through the Poi't early in 1953, the ap- 



plicable rates were very unfavorable. 

"This condition did not deter the ex- 
porters and the first cargo was moved to 
the Port by the exporter's own trucks. 
In March of 1953 the Common Carrier 
Tobacco Truck Lines were approached 
with the request to adjust the tobacco 
rates from the main producing [joints 
into Morehead City in line with rates 
then in effect to Hampton Roads, Va. 
and Wilmington, N. C. These truckers 
believed in the future movements into 
Morehead City and were prompt in filing 
more favorable rates, which became ef- 
fective in May 1953. 

"The Atlantic & East Carolina Rail- 
way submitted a further proposal to the 
Southern Freight Association in the early 
Fall of 1953 requesting tobacco rate ad- 
justment to Morehead City. This time 
there was sufficient evidence of traffic 
being moved and to be moved, and effec- 
tive in December, the rail rates from 
many, but not all, producing points were 
favorably adjusted to compete with pres- 
ent truck tobacco freight rates to More- 
head City as well as putting the Port in 
a competitive position ratewise with 
Hampton Roads Ports. 



Better Bananas 

A new $1,000,000 wharf to speed the 
handling of bananas was placed in opera- 
tion in the Port of New Orleans just 
before Christmas by the United Fruit 
Company. New type conveyor equipment 
reduces damage in handling the fruit. 



Wholesale 



Retail 



FREEMAN BROTHERS 

SUPPLYING 

STEAMERS, FREIGHTERS, FISH BOATS 

FANCY and STAPLE GROCERIES . . . FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

HIGH GRADE MEATS and MEAT PRODUCTS 

MILK - CREAM - ICE - FISH 

FREE DELIVERY 

Phone 6-3115, 3116, 3117 — Morehead City, N. C. 



Steel Imports Take Spotlight 



New Fabricating Plant 
Going Up In Port Area 

Imports of foreign steel, which have 
been spasmodic through North Carolina 
ports for the past several years, took on 
a new outlook with the January arrival 
of the S. S. Dunrobin from Antwerp 
with shipments of nails and wire products 
for the accounts of two major foreign 
steel importers. 

In prospect now are steel product stock- 
piling- enterprises which would insure a 
continuity of shipments through the Port 
of Wilmington for distribution throughout 
the trade area. 

To brighten the picture further, the 
Coastal Steel & Iron Company, a new 
concern, has under construction near Wil- 
mington a sizable fabricating plant which 
began operations this month. M. D. New- 
ton, president, and W. P. Stamper, gen- 
eral manager, say they expect to have 
the plant in full operation by February, 
and have already unloaded the first 100 
tons of new stock. 

The Woodward W. Williams Company 
of Columbia, S. C, is establishing a new 
steel distribution organization with head- 
quarters at the Wilmington SPA terminal, 
and began importing a sizable tonnage of 
wire products from Luxembourg aboard 
the S. S. Dunrobin. The shipper is the 
Amerlux Steel Products Corporation, New 
York, which the Williams company has 
represented in this territory for the past 
25 years. The new distributing organiza- 
tion is the Steel Products Supply Co. 

Hugh Griffin of Columbia, S. C, will 

W. P. Stamper — M. D. Newton 





W. Williams — Hugh Griilin 



serve as the Wilmington manager of the 
new firm, and the head of the company, 
W. W. Williams, said that he anticipates 
adding other steel product items to the 
Wilmington inventory as marketing and 
distribution factors permit. Mr. Williams 
said the new company is applying to the 
N. C. State Ports Authority for perma- 
nent office space at its terminal on the 
Cape Fear. 

For the American Hardware & Equip- 
ment Company of Charlotte, the Dunrobin 
brought a part cargo of nails from 
Western Europe. The shipper is Kurt 
Orban of New York, importer of steel 
products and machinery. Hugh McEach- 
ern, who represents Kurt Orban in the 
Carolina area, has expressed the hope 
that the firm can arrange to stockpile 
a variety of steel products for area dis- 
tribution in 1954. 

The foreign nails shipment is the 
second the American Hardware and 
Equipment Company has imported through 
the state terminal since its completion. An 
initial shipment of barbed wire was im- 
ported from Belgium by the company last 
Spring. 

The Coastal Steel & Iron Company will 
specialize in structural steel and tanks 
at the new fabricating plant, Newton said. 
Officials said that while a major portion 
of their stock will come from domestic 
steel sources, a quantity of foreign items 
will be imported when available. The firm 
also expects to use the Intracoastal Wa- 
terway system for some of its distribu- 
tion up and down the coast. 



NEW SPA DIRECTOR 

(Continued from Page Eleven) 

army transportation areas of New York 
and San Francisco to responsibilities of 
supply, maintenance and transport in 
Iran, West Germany. During- the war ye- 
ars, Colonel Man 1 was chief of staff of 
the Fourth Infantry Division assigned 
to the European Theatre of Operations, 
participating in the Normandy Invasion 
and other major phases of action. 

SPA's chairman said that Colonel 
Marr's record was outstanding among al- 
most a score of applicants considered by 
the board, and that his demonstrated 
ability to organize and administer many 
phases of complex operations particularly 
(nullifies him for his new post. Other SPA 
members have stressed the new director's 
record on utilization of personnel and 
successful handling of vital land and wa- 
ter transport operations as among- the 
assets he brings to the ports agency. 
Colonel Marr is a native of Chicago. 

"Our goal is the fullest possible utili- 
zation of the splendid marine facilities 
with which the state has modernized and 
improved its major seaports," Colonel 
Marr said. 

"To achieve this we must go after all 
the water-borne traffic that can advant- 
ageously use our harbors. Too, we must 
continually seek to adapt our terminals 
and their equipment to a wider accom- 
modation of basic and diversified cargo. 

The new executive director placed high 
on the list of objectives the attraction of 
regular steamship service into the Ports 
of Morehead City and Wilmington; the 
encouragement of importers to use the 
state's terminals as distribution points for 
South Atlantic and mid-West territory, 
and the build-up of outbound cargoes to 
support two way traffic. 

"It is now our main task to create, and 
to present to those in commerce, the com- 
petitive advantages which are potentially 
ours and which can induce business to 
profitably use our harbors. The opportuni- 
ty is here, and the rewards of port de- 
velopment can be rich. I am certain that 
if enough effort is expended effective 
progress toward our goal will be evident 
during every period of the future," Man- 
said. 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 




Member 

Federal Deposit 

Insurance Corporation 

WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



T. A. LOVING 

AND 

COMPANY 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 




Builders of SPA Terminal at 
Morehead City 

Goldsboro, 
North Carolina 



Peter B. Ruffin, President 
W. D. Williams, Secretary 



W. P. Emerson, Vice-President 
J. P. Wilson, Treasurer 



Wilmington Snipping Company 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 270 
Telephone 2-3381 



Cable Address 
WILSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



STONE TOWING LINE 




MARINE RAILWAY 

4 South Water Street • Telephone 4547 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



Fumigating Is 1 1)54 Goal 



As an added service to importers and 
exporters of tobacco, cotton and other 
commodities in line for fumigation, the 
North Carolina State Ports Authority 
completed in January its streamlined fum- 
igating' plant, and among- other objectives 
for 1954 will be the promotion of this 
service with the textile and tobacco in- 
dustries. 

The new plant will undergo a series of 
tests and a crew is being trained to op- 
erate it at SPA's Wilmington terminal. 
The plant (see cover) consists of two 
vacuum type .loading chambers of 7,225 
cubic feet each and a building housing 
machinery and laboratory. The gas mix- 
ing, control mechanisms and vacuum 
pumps are of the latest type. 

It is said to be one of the largest in the 
South and is loaded by tractor-drawn 
trailers which reduces handling- to the 
minimum. The 77 foot chambers are of 
special steel construction with approach 
drives and ramps of concrete. The plant is 



readily accesible to the docks and storage 
area of the terminal and is directly adja- 
cent to rail and truck loading facilities. 

Robert and Company of Atlanta were 
engineers on the project with Pyramid 
Construction Company of Wilmington as 
erectors. The cost of the new fumigating 
plant was approximately $115,000. 



Ship With Canadian 
Potatoes Due In Jan. 

The S. S. Robell discharged 10,000 
bags of potatoes early this month when 
it arrived from Prince Edward Island, 
Canada. The receivers are the Charles 
R. Allen Company of Charleston, S. C, 
and the Wilmington Shipping Company 
is agent. 

The movement of potatoes to North 
Carolina ports was active in the 19.30's 
but fell away during and after the last 



THE SPRUNT CORPORATION 

(Established 1866) 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Owners and Operators 

Champion Compress Warehouse Ship Channel Compress Warehouse 

Wilmington, N. C. Houston, Texas 

WAREHOUSING OF GENERAL COMMODITIES 

Specializing in Storage of 
COTTON, SUGAR AND TOBACCO 

Wilmington Offices, Warehouses and Docks 
Located at Foot of Walnut Street and Cape Fear River 



Telephones: 5281, 5282 



P. O. Drawer : 900 



Small Ports, Coastal 
Area Survey Will Give 
New Appraisal to N. C. 

The survey of small North Carolina 
harbors, inland ports and communities in 
the state's coastal area, authorized by the 
last legislature, is proceeding and prom- 
ises to provide a new look at the needs 
and potentialities of the territory by next 
Fall. 

The appraisal is under the direction and 
supervision of the North Carolina De- 
partment of Conservation and Develop- 
ment and is being conducted by the New 
York firm of Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Hall 
and MacDonald. Col. L. F. Rhodes, retired 
U. S. Army engineer, is directing the 
survey which will take about eight months 
to complete. 

The survey was endorsed by the North 
Carolina Marine Council which success- 



fully urged the legislature to finance the 
venture. Its purpose is to present a com- 
prehensive study of all the facilities at 
existing ports and on the coastal wa- 
terways, and to recommend a program 
for their expansion and development. 
Special emphasis will be placed on an 
appraisal of shipping facilities, warehous- 
ing and other factors vital to water bourne 
traffic. 

The survey program has been expanded 
to include agricultural, industrial and rec- 
reational potentialities and needs of the 
area which embraces 41 North Carolina 
counties. The study will be coordinated 
with the overall state industrial program, 
Colonel Rhodes said. 



Nearly two-thirds of government op- 
erating subsidy payments made to Amer- 
ican shipping lines over the last 14 years 
have been paid back to Uncle Sam by the 
companies. 



Forwarders F.M.B. Reg. No. 609 


W. O. SMITH & CO., INC. 


Established 1865 


"88 Years of Continuous 

Satisfactory Service" 

• 

EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL 

FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 

• 


"The Complete Export Service" 
NEW YORK 4, N. Y.— 35 Water St. 


BALTIMORE 2, MD.— American Bldg. 


NORFOLK 10. Va.— Citizens Bank Bldg. 


NEW ORLEANS 12. LA.— Carondelet Bldg. 


"MOREHEAD CITY'S PIONEER FORWARDER." 



H. B. LUDLUM & SONS 

COMPLETE LINE: 

SALVAGE AND NEW BUILDING MATERIALS 
SHIP DUNNAGE AND CRATING 

TELEPHONE 3-2634 

Carolina Beach Road & Raleigh Street 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



Italian Imports Planned 



A cargo of what is described by the 
shippers, the Ashcraft-Williamson Co., of 
Atlanta and Norfolk, as new type of bag- 
ged Italian calcium anonium nitrate, is 
scheduled for the SPA docks at Wilming- 
ton in February. Another shipment is 
planned for April. 

As a forerunner to the movement of 
bagged Italian fertilizer materials, the 
S. S. Enrico C. discharged a part cargo 
of bulk sulphate of amonia from Italy at 
Heide Warehouse Company dock in the 
upper Wilmington harbor. 

Robert E. Ashcraft, vice president of 
the company, has been contacting ferti- 
lizer plants and distributors throughout 
the mid-Atlantic territory and reports that 
the reaction to the free-flowing C. A. N. 
has been highly favorable. He predicts 
that a sustained demand in the heavy 
consuming areas of North Carolina and 
adjacent territory will mean continued 
seasonal shipments through North Caro- 
lina ports. 

The Italian C. A. N. is bagged in Italy 
and will be distributed under the trade 
name "Anmical", Ashcraft said. During 
the past 18 months of operation, the new 
state terminal on the Cape Fear river has 
gained solid experience in handling bag- 
ged fertilizer materials with dispatch. 




Robert E. Ashcraft, vice president of The 
Ashcraft-Williamson Co., (right) is showing SPA 
Commercial Representative H. L. Larcome a 
sample of the new type Italian calcium amon- 
ium nitrate which his firm will import through 
the Port of Wilmington with the first of two 
ships scheduled for February. 



A new correspondence course, entitled 
"Marine Safety (Deck)," is being offer- 
ed by the U. S. Maritime Service Insti- 
tute, according to Rear Admiral H. J. 
Tiedemann, USMS, Chief, Office of Mari- 
time Training. 



HELP BUILD N. C. PORTS 



USE N. C. SEA GATEWAYS 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of Steamship Piers, 
Railroad Trestles and Bridges and Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK. N. Y. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE — WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 

GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and to abrasion. It is particularly 
suitable for flooring, bulkheads, dolphins, rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State docks 
at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 




-sat 



yr 



SOUTH ATLANTIC AND CARIBBEAN PORTS ASSOCIATION: Left lo right: Philip L. Sullivan, 
third Vice-President, Wilmington, N. C; Salvador V. Caro, second Vice President, San Juan, 
Puerto Rico; D. Leon Williams, retiring president So. Atlantic Ports Conference, Atlanta, Ga.: 
W. H. McGowan, President, South Atlantic and Caribbean Ports Association, Savannah, Ga.; and 
J. P. Qualey, First Vice President, Charleston, S. C. Insert, left. Jack Holt, SPA, Morehead City 
Terminal Mgr.; right, E. E. Lee, Jr., SPA Traffic Manager. Both were named to board of directors. 



HYMAN SUPPLY COMPANY 

"Everything for the Mill" 

— DISTRIBUTORS OF — 

INDUSTRIAL AND PLUMBING SUPPLIES 
PAINTS AND HEAVY HARDWARE 

BRANCHES: 

HYMAN SUPPLY CO., Fayeteville, N. C. — SUMTER SUPPLY CO., Sumter, S. C. 

TEL. 5294 WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WILMINGTON IRON WORKS, Inc. 

Established 1838 

MANUFACTURERS, JOBBERS, AND DISTRIBUTORS 

ENGINEERS — FOUNDERS — MACHINISTS 
AND BOILERMAKERS 

ELECTRIC AND OXY ACETYLENE WELDING 

GRAY IRON — BRASS — SEMI-STEEL CASTINGS 

MARINE AND MILL SUPPLIES 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



INDUSTRIAL OPPORTUNITIES 

ARE THE RULE — NOT EXCEPTION, AT 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

Offering The Best In . . . 

SHIPPING — WAREHOUSING — MANU- 
FACTURING — HOUSING — TOURIST 
ACCOMMODATIONS — RECREATIONAL 
FACILITIES 



Year 'Round Climate 

Avg. Temp. — July 78 deg. — Jan. 48 deg. 

Currently Available 

INDUSTRIAL SITES 

HOTEL SITES 
WATERFRONT HOME SITES 

Inquire : 

Morehead City 

Chamber of Commerce 

MOREHEAD CITY. N. C. 





THE BEST TO YOU IN 1954 FROM.. 
Our Morehead City Office 




Complete Banking Service for Every Particular Need 

MEMBER OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 

First-Citizens Ba.nk.& Trust Company: 

North: Ccrbllrfia :*: ". . •*•'• ■"• *...' '... j ;"•• 



POSTMASTER: If not delivered in 10 days, re- 
turn to Box 1048, State Ports Authority, 
Wilmington, N. C. Return Postage Guaranteed. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE LIBRARY 
RALEIGH, N.C. 



Sec. 34.66, P. L. & R. 

U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Wilmington. N. C. 

Permit No. 225 



CARTERET TOWING CO., Inc. 

MOREHEAD CITY. NORTH CAROLINA 



HARBOR AND 

INTERCOASTAL 

WA T ERWAY 

TOWING 

Rates on Request 

P. O. BOX 185 
PHONE 6-3292 




' *" % -i 



Atlantic and E. ina 

Railroad Company 

SERVING THE PORT OF MOREHEAD CITY 

Big Enough To Do The Job . . . Yet Small Enough 
To Take A Personal Interest In Each Shipper 




X. C. S„ P. A. Terviiva\rP,ort of Morehead City 

NEW BERN, NORTH CAROLINA 



Worth Carolina Slate l.brarv Tekua^DlaicL 



CAROLINA 




The Wilmington Savings & Trust Co. 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

"North Carolina's Port Bank" 

Capital Surplus 

$300,000 * $1,000,000 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 

and 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 

A Symbol of Service and Progress Since 1S88 











o. 


E. 

SHIP 


DURANT 

CHANDLER 














PROVISIONS. DECK. 


ENGINEERS. & STEWARDS SUPPLIES 








Columbian 


Rope 


— International 


Paint & Socony-Vacuum 


Oil 


Co., 


Inc. 




Teleph< 


ine 


4232 








Water 


and 


Market 


Streets 










WILMINGTON. 


NORTH CAROLINA 











THE SPRUNT CORPORATION 

(Established 1866) 

WILMINGTON. NORTH CAROLINA 

Owners and Operators 

Champion Compress Warehouse Ship Channel Compress Warehouse 

Wilmington, N. C. Houston, Texas 

WAREHOUSING OF GENERAL COMMODITIES 

Specializing in Storage of 
COTTON, SUGAR AND TOBACCO 

Wilmington Offices, Warehouses and Docks 
Located at Foot of Walnut Street and Cape Fear River 

Telephones: 5281, 5282 P. 0. Drawer : 980 



PETER B. RupPIN, President 
W. I). Williams, Secretary 



W. P. Emkrson, Vice-President 
J. P. Wilson, Treasurer 



Wilmington Snipping Company 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 270 
Telephone 2-3381 



Cable Address 
WILSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



STONE TOWING LINE 




MARINE RAILWAY 

4 South Water Street • Telephone 4547 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



George T. Adams To 
To Assist Director 
On Ports' Programs 




George T. Adams 

George T. Adams, until recently an ac- 
count executive with a nationally known 
public relations office in the East, has 
joined the North Carolina State Ports 
Authority as executive assistant to its 
director, beginning his duties March 1. 

In his public relations capacity, Adams 
handled a number of promotional pro- 
grams for million-dollar industries. Prior 
to that connection he was civilian public 
relations director for the commanding 
general of the First Army. His principal 
task was to promote better understand- 
ing and closer relations between military 
installations and civilian communities 
within the First Army area which em- 
braces approximately 30 percent of the 
nation's population. In these programs he 
worked closely with federal, state and 
local authorities as well as private organ- 
izations. 

During World War II Adams was with 
the United States Navy attached to the 
amphibious forces. It has taken him very 
little time to fix his sights on SPA pro- 
motional objectives. 

(Continued on Page 19) 




TO 

WILMINGTON ! 

NORTH CAROLINA'S 

Major Port District 

and Gateway to . . . 

WORLD TRADE 



-JL- Excellent Transportation 
Service. 



Diversified Water Front ^ 
Activity 

•fe Ample Sites on Deep Water 

Efficient Private, Public Docks ■£■ 



For Information Write: 

BUREAU OF RATES 

INDUSTRY & COMMERCE 

CITY OF WILMINGTON 

P. O. BOX 604 

WILMINGTON. N. C. 



NORTH 

CAROLINA 

PORTS 




Official Publication N. C. S. P. A. 

Feb. March, 1954 — Vol. 1, No. 3 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

Chairman Edwin Pale 

Vice-Chairman Raymond A. Bryan 

Secretary-Treasurer W. Avery Thompson 

Member . . .. J. Harry While 

Member . Harvey W. Moore 

Member Harold F. Coffey 

Executive Director 

COL. RICHARD S. MARR 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

George T. Adams Asst. to Director 
E. E. Lee, Jr. Traffic Manager 

H. N. Larcombe Com'l. Agt. 

WILMINGTON OFFICE 

P. O. Box 1048 — Telephone 3-1622 

Philip L. Sullivan Terminal Mgr. 

MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

P. O. Box 145 — Telephone 6-3159 

J. D. Holt Terminal Mgr. 

Walter H. Friederichs Assistant 



e 



oOei 



The air view of the city of Wilmington 
with one of its "gates" ajar, is the work of 
Hugh Morton who doubles in nationally 
known photography and the development of 
Grandfather Mountain in the Smokies which 
he. aptly enough, slogans "Carolina's Top 
Scenic Attraction". The S. S. Gloria, which 
put in at Morehead City a few months ago 
for tobacco, is returning for more of the 
same for Western Germany in April. 



Veteran of 45 Years 
On Cape Fear River 
Retires from Agency 




H. V. Conly 

The resignation of its assistant director, 
H. V. Conly, 77, has been reluctantly ac- 
cepted by the North Carolina State Ports 
Authority, and he will retire after serving 
from the date of the agency's inception 
six years ago. 

Mr. Conly asked to be relieved Febru- 
ary 1, but at the request of Executive 
Director Richard S. Marr he will continue 
on a part-time status until a replacement 
can be brought in. Reasons of health, he 
said, make his retirement advisable, "But 
I'll still be active at something," he added. 

That is not surprising since for the 
past 45 years he has been playing an 
active part in developing North Caro- 
lina's navigable waters. For almost 40 
years he served with the Wilmington Dis- 
trict office of the Corps of Engineers, 
leaving that station after having become 
chief administrative officer. 

After a brief retirement he joined 
SPA's first director, Col. George W. Gil- 
lette, with whom he had worked in the 
district engineer's office. The two, plus 

(Continued on Page 20) 



Major Freight Forwarder 
Sets Up Morehead Office 

The first major shipping agency to establish permanent offices for 
operations in the Port of Morehead City has been welcomed here by North 
Carolina Port Authority and local leaders as another step in the develop- 
ment of the harbor as a significant gateway to ocean commerce. 

Officials of the newly formed Morehead 



City Shipping Company called on SPA Di- 
rector Richard S. Marr at the State- 
owned marine terminal, J. D. Holt, its 
manager and Mayor George W. Dill and 
others to discuss its plans for a complete 
ship agency, freight forwarding and 
stevedoring service. The new company is 
a branch of the long established Wil- 
mington Shipping Company and Peter 
B. Ruffin, President, made the announce- 
ment and called on Colonel Marr here 
today. 

Colonel Marr said he hoped other firms 
would follow the Morehead City Ship- 
ping Company's lead. "We consider the 
establishment of this company as a most 
fortunate development for the port", 
Colonel Marr said. "The State Ports Au- 
thority is exerting every effort to in- 
duce such firms, essential to a complete 
port service, to move directly into our 
port development program. This includes 
freight forwarders, import-export firms, 
shippers, distributors, steamship agencies 
and transportation lines." 

In announcing the establishment of the 
new concern, Ruffin said that William 
T. Davies will act as manager of the com- 
pany's affairs and operations in More- 
head City. Davies has recently moved 
to Morehead City from Falls Church, 
Virginia. He was formerly Assistant 
Chief Accountant of the Reconstruction 
Finance Corporation in Washington, D. C. 
Davies has owned a home in Morehead 
City for some years, it was learned. 

"We have been attending vessels of our 
principals and carrying on stevedoring 
operations in Morehead City for some 
years," Ruffin stated. "With the increase 
in shipping in the port and in view of 
favorable prospects for increased activi- 
ty in the future, we have felt it ad- 
visable to establish our own organization 



on the spot rather than continue to serve 
the port from our Wilmington office. 
In this way we expect to render more 
efficient service to our principals, and 
we hope to be a real asset to Morehead 
City. 

"We have confidence in the future of 
the port and look forward to greater ac- 
tivity here. We have always had the 
friendliest sort of relations with all the 
port and civic interests in Morehead City. 
We appreciate the way they have coop- 
erated with us in the past, and it is our 
desire to cooperate fully with them and 
to be part of the community. 

"We consider ourselves fortunate in 
obtaining the service of Mr. Davies as 
our manager. In his former position with 
the Reconstruction Finance Corporation 
he had the day to day responsibility for 
the financial planning of the Govern- 
ment's synthetic rubber program, its 
domestic and foreign tin ore purchase and 
smelting program, the abaca plantations 
in Central America, and the lending re- 
sponsibilities of the RFC. His thorough 
familiarity with world commerce makes 
him well suited for his duties in More- 
head City at a time when the port is be- 
coming more actively engaged in for- 
eign trade," Ruffin stated. 

The Wilmington Shipping Company is 
one of the most active port agencies in 
Wilmington and represents a large num- 
ber of steamship companies, importers 
and exporters. Offices are maintained at 
the North Carolina State Docks. Other 
officers are W. P. Emerson, Vice Presi- 
dent, W. D. Williams, Secretary, and J. P. 
Wilson, Treasurer. The Morehead City 
Shipping Company, as a branch, will op- 
erate under the general direction of the 
offices of the company in Wilmington, 
Ruffin said. 



SPA Heads Hail McLean's 
Cape Fear Sea-Land Depot 

N. C. State Ports Authority officials have expressed keen satisfaction that the 
agency will play a key role during its second full year of operation in the establish- 
ment on the Cape Fear River a project which may well prove to be one of the most 
important transportation developments the South has witnessed in many years — the 
proposed McLean Trucking Company "Sea-Land" truck terminal to move Southern 
freight by land and water to northern ports. 
SPA Chairman Edwin Pate and Execu- 



tive Director Richard S. Marr have an- 
nounced that full cooperation will be 
given to forward the plans for the $50,- 
000,000 terminal (a full description of 
which is given on the following pages). 

The Tarheel port development officials 
have stated that McLean will have a let- 
ter of intent from SPA stating the agen- 
cy's willingness to construct a $2,500,000 
marine-truck terminal for the firm when 
it goes before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission to show that public conven- 
ience and necessity would be profitably 
and economically served by the enterprise. 
SPA's position as stated in the letter is 
conditioned upon approval of ICC and 
upon the proposition that a satisfactory 
lease can be worked out between the two 
major parties. 

Pate and Marr explained that funds 
with which to construct the unique termi- 
nal would probably be raised by the 
agency through the issuance of revenue 
bonds which would be secured by the 



revenues derived from operation of the 
new land-sea truck docks and facilities 
and would not involve the remainder of 
the state's $7,500,000 marine terminal 
properties. 

McLean officials said they could have 
the new terminal in operation by the 
end of 1955 if no unforseen obstacles 
are encountered. Negotiations between 
SPA and the McLean officials began late 
last summer after Governor Umstead ap- 
pointed new members to the agencys gov- 
erning board. Tentative plans for the sig- 
nificant project were kept closely under 
wraps until two weeks ago. 

The State Ports Authority also pressed 
forward its long-formulated plans to pro- 
vide additional storage and transit ware- 
house facilities at its terminals at Wil- 
mington and Morehead City. Pate and a 
committee were authorized by the SPA 
board to proceed with the first steps for 
the construction of space to cost approxi- 
mately $700,000. 



The designer's drawing of the new stern-loading, twin-screw, turbine driven vessel below, 
is slated for use in "Sea-Land" operation planned by McLean Trucking Co. of Winston-Salem, 
N. C. Ships are 650 feet long, capable of 19 knots, will carry 200 loaded trailers under two 
covered decks, and are scheduled to run between Providence. New York, and Wilmington, N. C. 





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McLean Plans "Sea-Land" 
Truck-Transport Service 

The following,- detail of plans for the terminal facilities and ships which are en- 
visioned for the proposed "Sea-Land" service • — which the McLean Trucking- Company 
of Winston-Salem and the North Carolina State Ports Authority has announced they 
intend to construct in the Port of Wilmington — was authorized when news of the 
$50,000,000 enterprise was revealed by M. P. McLean, president of the transportation 
firm. The account indicates that the plans are already well advanced for both land 
and sea operations, and that the new terminal may be a reality by the end of 1955. 
One of the 



nation's "top ten" motor 
freight systems, McLean Trucking Com- 
pany expects its "Sea-Land" service to 
be inaugurated sometime next year. The 
first step in the new plan was completed 
recently when McLean Trucking Company 
acquired all the capital stock of S. C. 
Loveland Company, Inc., steamship and 
tug-and-barge water carrier serving all 
points along the Atlantic coast. An ap- 
plication has been filed with the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission for approval 
of this transaction, and for the merger 
of the two companies. Construction of 
four large trailer-transport ships will be- 
gin when approval for the McLean-Love- 
land merger is obtained from the Inter- 
Laying the groundwork with a scale model, 
the executives of the McLean Trucking Co. 
find it easy to visualize the practical principals 
of their proposed "Sea-Land" service. Left to 
right, they are: J. K. McLean, George B. Kemp- 
ton, and Malcom P. McLean. 




state Commerce Commission. Preliminary 
designs for these special ships are now 
on the drawing boards at Bethlehem 
Steel Company, Shipbuilding Division. 

McLean "Sea-Land" service, the result 
of more than a year of research and in- 
vestigation, will benefit the shipping pub- 
lic by providing- the economies of lower- 
cost water transportation coupled with 
the flexibility of modern door-to-door 
motor freight service. Under the new 
plan, the extensive McLean conventional 
motor carrier land system will be co- 
ordinated with the sailing schedules of 
the new trailer-transport ships. 

Initially, the new ships are scheduled 
to call at one South Atlantic port, Wil- 
mington, N. C, and two North Atlantic 
ports, New York and Providence. More 
ports-of-call will be added as the service 
is expanded. Six round-trip sailings per 
week will be made between the Southern 
port and the two Northern ports. These 
sailings have been co-ordinated with the 
present movement of motor carrier traf- 
fic between the two areas of the Atlantic 
seaboard. 

New dockside construction which will 
be required includes adjustable loading 
ramps, yard space for up to 1,000 trailers 
and other conventional truck terminal 
facilities. 

The new ships for use in McLean 
"Sea-Land" service will be 650 feet long 
and have a speed of up to 20 knots. The 
twin-screw, turbine-driven vessels are de- 
signed to carry approximately 240 trailers. 
In addition to available space on an open 
top deck, each ship will have two en- 
closed trailer decks, plus auxiliary space 
in the hold. The open top deck and the 
hold will be reached by ramps from the 
two enclosed decks. 




Designer's preliminary model of port facilities for new S50 million system of freight trans- 
portation announced by M. P. McLean, president of McLean Trucking Co. Called "Sea-Land" 
service, the proposed method will combine low cost water freight and flexible motor freight service. 



Trailers at the docks will have direct 
access to the two enclosed ship decks 
through the stern. Land units will be 
driven on and off the ships over variable- 
height, double-deck ramps installed on the 
shore. The two enclosed trailer decks may 
be loaded and unloaded simultaneously. 
The complete loading and unloading cycle 
is expected to consume only four hours 
per ship. 

Announcement of plans to build four 
large dry-cargo ships, each to cost in 
excess of $5,500,000, is unprecedented in 
recent years. A survey revealed that not 
one dry-cargo ship has been built for a 
private American account since 1948, and 
that not a single order for a privately 
owned ship of this type is on the books. 

Construction of the trailer-transport 
ships for the McLean "Sea-Land" service 
is expected to be accomplished with pri- 
vate capital. Nevertheless, the McLean 
project will be a material contribution 
to the nation's security requirements. It 
was announced on January 31, 1954 that 
the Military Sea Transportation Service 
has requested funds to begin construc- 
tion of a "roll-on roll-off" ship of a type 



long sought by the Army. The McLean 
"Sea-Land" ships are particularly suited 
to military sea-transport requirements. 
In addition, building these vessels will 
help keep American shipyards in opera- 
tion. 

By helping to restore water service 
which formerly existed on the East coast, 
McLean "Sea-Land" service will fill an 
important need for dry-freight water 
transportation between points along the 
Eastern seaboard. Considerable coastwise 
service was never resumed after conven- 
tional dry-cargo ships were taken from 
this trade for use overseas during World 
War II. Vessels operating in coastwise 
service were reduced in number from 490 
in 1938 to only 196 in 1948. Some of the 
reasons this service has not been restored 
include lack of suitable vessels, high cost 
of cargo handling (including pilferage), 
delay in ports, inefficient port facilities, 
and lack of co-ordination with land car- 
riers moving between ports and interior 
points. 

These difficulties will be overcome by 
the new McLean "Sea-Land'* service. How 

(Continued on Page 18) 



A New Surge of Industrial 
Growth Led by C&D Agency 

All port cities of the nation reach hungrily back into the immensely productive in- 
terior of the country for manufactured export goods and agricultural commodities, and 
constantly seek to serve as the gateways through which the vast central area of the 
U. S. receives its imported materials and supply. Nevertheless, the industrial and 
agricultural output within the immediate port area, and certainly within its own state 
limits is of most vital importance. The history of North Carolina's deep water outlets 
to the sea illustrates the truth of this assertion more adequately. As cotton, timber 
and naval stores exports declined, then vanished, Tarheel harbors became quiet. 

It would seem logical that as North Carolina forged to range among the leading 
industrial states, its ports should have also grown apace; but while substantial gains 
have been made in export-import trade, the ports have not kept abreast of the remain- 
der of the state. 

Now, however, there is a sustained and determined effort being made by Gov. 
William B. Umstead, the Department of Conservation & Development, the State 
Ports Authority ,and the many communities of the state to tie industrial and agricul- 
tural expansion with port development and utility. Almost 150 new industries have 
been established in North Carolina since the drive started last year; 90 or more estab- 
lished industries have expanded. Other such developments are on the way, the De- 
partment of Conservation and Development recently reported to the governor. So 
there seems to be a new surge of industrial growth in the area which the ports seek 
first to serve. How this all came about is factually told for NORTH CAROLINA PORT 
readers by Wade Lucas, C & D's public relations director. 
By WADE LUCAS 



Raleigh — When Governor William B. 
Umstead was inaugurated in Raleigh on 

January 8, 1953, he 

made a statement ,,--'" 

during the course of j 
h i s inaugural ad- ' \ 

dress that set in mo- 
tion some group 
thinking which has 
resulted in a rather 
unique approach to 
efforts being made 
to bring more indus- 
tries to North Caro- 
lina. 

In that address, Ben E. Douglas 

Governor Umstead said in part: "If we 
continue to improve the State services 
now being rendered, it will be necessary 
to have more tax dollars. In my opinion, 
it is better to obtain new taxpayers than 
to increase taxes on the taxpayers we 
now have." 

Conscious of the fact that no State in 
the union furnishes a wider variety of 
services to its citizens, and that they 
would be unwilling to see such services 




curtailed, the newly appointed members 
of the North Carolina Board of Conser- 
vation and Development lost no time at 
their first meeting in adopting a sugges- 
tion by Robert M. Hanes of Winston- 
Salem, who shortly before had been nam- 
ed chairman of the board's committee on 
commerce and industry. 

This suggestion was for a series of ten 
Development Forums and they were plan- 
ned in the hope of arousing people in the 
various communities and enlisting their 
support in the drive for a State-wide de- 
velopment program designed to bring 
more new industries to North Carolina. 

Governor Umstead sparkplugged the 
first of these, held at Zebulon for indus- 
try-minded citizens of nine counties in 
that section of the State. Around 700 per- 
sons attended the initial forum to hear 
Governor Umstead cite in unmistakable 
terms the growing need for more taxpay- 
ers for the State if present State services 
are to be improved. 

Grateful for such all-out assistance 
from the Governor, who is also chairman 

(Continued on Page 17) 



Human Interest in Port 





Crew members of the S.S. Irish Hazel who 
last fall smuggled in Irish Sweepstake lottery 
tickets worth an estimated $2. 000. 000. didn't 
pause for photographs, but some other inter- 
esting North Carolina port visitors do. The 
world looked when Ft. Bragg atomic artillery- 
men embarked for Europe (upper left); School 
children found a rare opportunity to visit the 
British Motor Ship Silver Oak and view the 
Cape Fear thru radar steering equipment (Up- 
per Right); Dock workers perked up when 
three charming Norwegian girls came as crew 
members aboard the M. S. Harpefjell (left). The 
most colorful passengers we've had were eight 
graduate students from India, guests of Ameri- 
can universities. These are a few of the human 
interest incidents which add zest to the opera- 
tions of the N. C. State ports terminals. 




Very little time ©lapses alter the vessel has docked before shell 
buckets drop into the holds for last discharge/ dropping the material 
into hoppers which feed the 36 v conveyor heU. :: 




Here the belt moves the material along the dock and up the long 
covered incline to : thje top of the warehouse. The outside distance is 
approximately 700 fe^ : xxxxX x:x 

The belt moves :the nitrate along 40 feet above the floor of the ware- 
house and a tripper spills it into great cones just as high as the belt. The 
tall man in the picture is W. Si B. Beane, president of Heide Warehouse 
Company, and with him is Louis B. Finberg, vice president. Both are 
wearing extremely -satisfied looks. 




Port's 

New Termii* 
Nitrate 



The Port of Wilmi: 
of bulk cargo handling 

Welcomed evidence 
onstrated during Januai 
of Chilean nitrate of 
terminal located in Wilr 
modern as any on the 

The new terminal 
Heide Warehouse Comp; 
completed a $600,000 c< 
docked. 

Since March of 19551 
destroyed the port's ml 
been limited in this res) 
to other ports in the inl 
ties. But the picture 1 
improvements. 

Heide Warehouse C< 
with two other firms wi 
firm, established in 1863 
associated concern, Heidt 
freight forwarders and s 
of years. They move all 
including the State Docl 

The new plant has a 
feet with its conveyor 
floor. Its two double bag 
rail loading platforms hal 

A payloader is busy hi 
which it feeds into the ha 
operation to insure a free f!| 




£-'" 



wmm 



ulk Picture Brightens 



rigs Chilean 

>rt of Wilmington 

stepped into a bigger league 
s. 

nproved status has been dem- 
bruary when five full cargoes 

been handled at a new bulk 
upper harbor and described as 
last. 

54, on New Year's Day when 
le Seaboard Air Line Railroad 
1 project and the first vessel 

re swept the upper harbor and 
warehouses, Wilmington has 
najor tonnages have been lost 
use of lack of adequate facili- 
ened. The pictures illustrate 

lerates the new terminal along- 
capacity of 00,000 tons. The 
dies bulk materials daily. An 
iny, Inc., operate as stevedores, 
agents, and have for a number 
cargo through other terminals 

3f 33,000 tons, and is 100 x 400 
m running 40 feet above the 
i which are directly adjacent to 
put capacity of (500 tons a day, 




In Wilmington to see the operation of the new terminal were 
German chemical executives whose plants turn out both bulk and 
bagged fertilizer materials for this country. In this piciure. taken 
as the group visited the SPA docks, are from the left. Dr. Christoph 
Ochsenfarth. of Castro-Rauxel; John M. Wallach of H. J. Baker 
& Bros.. New York; W. S. R. Beane, Heide & Co.; Jurgen Petersen, 
of Ruhr-Stickstoff; Dir. Walther Steinle, of Wanne-Eickel, and 
Philip L. Sullivan, SPA terminal manager. 



or 24,000 bags. The new operations supplies many of the 
14 fertilizer plants in the Wilmington area and others 
throughout the territory served by the port. 

In addition to the five ships which have been dis- 
charged at the terminal, others are scheduled for the re- 



g into one of the great piles of nitrate 
I hopper for elevation for a screening 
; bags. 



(Continued on Page 16) 

The bagging plant offers a spectacle of production line 
precision as the bag is placed, filled and weighed, then 
passed along for preparation for stitching after which it 
falls on rollers to be conveyed to waiting box cars. 




Morehead City Enters List 
Of Southern Sugar Centers 

Two solid years of effort by J. B. Kittrell & Company, Greenville, N. C. brokers 
and distributors, has finally resulted in initiating the Port of Morehead City as a sugar 
distribution center with the first cargo, discharged by the freighter M. S. Antwerpen 
in February, to be followed with other shipments scheduled for March and April. 

"We will handle approximately 300,000 
bags of refined sugar through Morehead 
City and the SPA terminal whenever ad- 
ditional storage facilities are available," 
said J. B. Kittrell whose firm has been in 
business with sugar and other commo- 
dities since 1910. "It's a natural point for 
Eastern North Carolina's supply." 

The sugar reaching the port was im- 
ported by M. Golodetz & Co., of New 
York. The M. S. Antwerpen is of the 
Buccaneer Line, Jacksonville, Fla. The 
newly established Morehead City Shipping 
Company were agents for the ship. The 
firm also stevedored the cargo. On hand 
to watch the unloading of the first ship- 
ment was M. F. Cacace, head of Golodetz' 
refined sugar department. 

"We are glad to add sugar to the list 
of commodities we are able to handle over 
the State Docks," SPA Terminal Manager, 
J. D. Holt, said. "Mr. Kittrell's efforts, in 
which SPA has heartily cooperated, offer 
another illustration of what North Caro- Trim motor vessels are the sugar carriers, 

Una's own importing, exporting and dis- plying the lanes between Cuba and Morehead 
tributors can do to help our ports grow City, recognized as "a natural point of Eastern 
and prosper as they directly benefit a North Carolina supply". 
widening circle within our economy. 

. Bagged sugar, neatly stacked in tiers within 

the hold will add up to approximately 300,000 
Unloading is carried out with a minimum of bags that will come through Morehead City 
effort, when wharves are uncluttered and spa- when additional storage facilities are available, 
cious, and warehouse storage for the bagged 
sugar immediately adjacent to dockside facili- 
ties. 






The storage and handling of refined sugar requires clean, fireproof storage where the bags 
can be turned and "paddled" to prevent hardening. 



In unloading and handling, palletized handling cuts costs and speeds discharge of cargo 
and loading. 




Bulk Picture Brightens 



(Continued from Page 13) 

mainder of the season. In previous years 
from 80,000 to 110,000 tons of Chilean 
nitrate of soda have been shipped through 
the Port of Wilmington. In addition, heavy 
tonnages of other fertilizer components 
have traditionally been handled here, mak- 
ing these commodities among the most 
important on the list. 

"From the holds of the vessel being 
discharged at the terminal docks, the ma- 
terial is removed with clam shell buckets 
which dump into hoppers which feed a 
36" Hewett-Robins belt that conveys it 
from shipside through the top of the 
warehouse through weather-protecting 
tubing," W. S. R. Beane, President of 
the company explains. 

"Conveying the material down the cen- 



ter of the building, 40 feet above the 
floor, trippers can be used to dump it at 
any point desired to build piles just as 
high. Payloaders are used to work the 
material to the bagging hoppers where 
it is elevated to a screen where all lumps 
are removed and it is funneled, free 
flowing, into bags and conveyed into cars 
a few feet away," he said. 

At present the new building is used 
by Chilean Nitrate, and with its steel, 
concrete and asbestos construction is con- 
sidered completely fireproof. Its two 
months of operation have already demon- 
strated an impressive savings in labor 
costs and has cut down considerably the 
time a vessel must remain at the dock. 

The Heide terminal is the first major 
replacement of the five warehouses de- 
stroyed by the March 9, fire. 



Forwarders F.M.B. Reg. No. 609 



W. O. SMITH & CO., INC. 



Established 1865 



"88 Years of Continuous 
Satisfactory Service" 

• 

EXPORT 



INTERNATIONAL 
FORWARDING AGENTS 



IMPORT 



"The Complete Export Service" 
NEW YORK 4. N. Y.— 35 Water St. 

BALTIMORE 2, MD.— American Bldg. 

NORFOLK 10. Va.— Citizens Bank Bldg. 



NEW ORLEANS 12. LA.— Carondelet Bldg. 
"MOREHEAD CITY'S PIONEER FORWARDER." 



SHIP LAUNDRY 

ONE DAY SERVICE 



Ideal Laundry and Dry Cleaners, Inc. 

FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE 6651 

WILMINGTON. N. C. 

"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



C & D CAMPAIGN 



(Continued from Page 10) 

of the State Board of Conservation and 
Development, and the board members, Ben 
E. Douglas, who himself had recently left 
a growing business in his home city of 
Charlotte at Covernor Umstead's request 
to become director of the State Depart- 
ment of Conservation and Development, 
and his aides immediately stepped up their 
efforts to bring more industrial payrolls 
into North Carolina. 

Many Are Helping 

Lt. Cov. Luther H. Hodges, a recognized 
industrialist in his own right, is giving 
yeoman service to the C&D campaign to 
attract new industries and thus help bring 
about a better balance between agricul- 
ture and industry in North Carolina. State 
Treasurer, Edwin M. Gill, and other public 
and private citizens are also giving whole- 
hearted backing to the campaign that Gov- 
ernor Umstead and his C&D aides are 
pushing so vigorously throughout the 
State. They are responding eagerly and 
readily to invitations to help in the in- 
dustry-seeking drive . 

Never before has such a campaign been 
waged in North Carolina to attract new 
industries and with them new industrial 
payrolls. And there are strong indications 
that the campaign is bringing some of 
the desired results. Desired results ap- 
parently being obtained on an increasing- 
scale are noted in efforts being made by 
local groups and individuals over the State 
to bring more industrial payrolls to their 
respective communities. 

The need for more industrial payrolls 
to help bring about a better balance be- 
tween agriculture and industry was fur- 
ther magnified recently when a Federal 
Governmental agency came out with a 
statement that North Carolina had slip- 
ped to 45th in the list of states in per 
capita income. This rather disturbing an- 
nouncement served to bring even stronger 
efforts on the part of those planning for 
more industries to do something to correct 
this blot upon the Tar Heel State's record. 

Hundreds of new plants have come into 



North Carolina since the drive began 
shortly after World War II, to industrial- 
ize the Tar Heel State more and morn 

In the Development Forum discussions 
it has also been pointed out by numerous 
speakers that the State's deep-water ports 
at Wilmington and Morehead City are 
potentially powerful factors in the over- 
all development of North Carolina and the 
bringing in of new industries that will 
serve to raise living standards of many of 
the State's citizens. Plans are now shaping 
up for further development of the State's 
smaller ports and waterways. These small 
ports and waterways loom large in the 
development program. 

Out-of-State industrialists, who have 
accepted invitations to appear on the pro- 
grams of the Development Forums and 
tell why they decided to locate plants in 
North Carolina and what industry expects 
of a community before it will locate a 
plant, have brought new hope and en- 
couragement to those pushing the cam- 
paign for more industrial payrolls for 
North Carolina. 

One of the most significant statements 
made by a number of these out-of-State 
industrialists is their praise of the North 
Carolina workers they employ. Quantity 
and quality of the work of these Tar Heel 
workers, men and women, and their will- 
ingness and quickness to learn their 
jobs well in the diversified industries lo- 
cating in the State have been pleasing to 
these out-of-State people who have in- 
vested millions of their dollars in North 
Carolina. And they are not a bit hesitant 
in saying so during the forum discussions 
and elsewhere, too. 

The fact that North Carolina has long 
stood at the ton in the South in industrial 
leadership, that it leads the Southeast in 
plant investment and equipment, that in 
1952 the value of goods manufactured in 
the State by almost one-half million work- 
ers was put at $6,426,000,000, but that the 
Tar Heel State still ranks comparatively 
low in per capita income are obviously 
serving to make the industry-planners 
more determined than ever before to do 
much more in the future than has been 
done in the past to bring about what Gov- 
ernor Umstead envisions as a "Cleaner, 
Greener, Finer North Carolina", and a 
more abundant life for all its people. 



McLEAN "SEA-LAND" SERVICE 



(Continued from Page 9) 

this will be accomplished is best describ- 
ed by comparing- conventional coastwise 
vessels with the new trailer-transport 
ships to be used in the McLean system. 

The average conventional coastwise ves- 
sel holds about 5,000 tons (about one 
trainload) and has five hatches. McLean 
"Sea-Land" vessels will hold about 3,500 
tons of net payload cargo. A 5,000 ton, 
five-hatch ship must be loaded and un- 
loaded through the hatches in sling loads. 
Complete loading and unloading by this 
conventional method consumes about 60 
hours — two and one-half days. Complete 
loading and unloading of a McLean "Sea- 
Land" vessel will take only about four 
hours. This tremendous saving of time- 
in-port alone is an important factor in 
maintaining a low-cost water service. 

Dockside facilities in the new operation 
will be used only by the McLean "Sea- 
Land" service. The "Sea-Land" port fa- 
cilities will be strategically located for 
easy access to arterial highways serving 
interior points. In this way, much of the 
savings in water transportation service 
will be made available to producing and 
consuming points hundreds of miles from 
the coast. 

While similar in some ways to other 
operations such as those transporting 
loaded rail cars over water, or even to 
the "piggy-back" development in which 
loaded trailers are forwarded overland 
on flat cars, McLean "Sea-Land" service 
is considered more practical and much 
more flexible. Successful applications of 
the same principle are found in the op- 
erations which transport loaded rail cars 
between Edgewater, N. J., and Gulf and 
South Atlantic ports, and between West 
Palm Beach, Fla., and Cuba. 

The McLean co-ordinated system is de- 
signed to be of particular value to the 
motor carrier industry, as well as to the 
shippers who use it. The interchange be- 
tween motor carriers generally of trail- 
ers for "Sea-Land" routing will be en- 
couraged by McLean Trucking Company. 
This policy will extend the benefits of 



lower-cost, co-ordinated sea and land 
service to all shippers and localities along 
the Eastern seaboard. It will help to re- 
duce motor carrier operating costs, and 
to preserve present competitive relation- 
ships. 

McLean Trucking Company was found- 
ed by M. P. McLean in 1934. The com- 
pany today is the largest motor freight 
Class I Common Carrier headquartered 
in the South, with 2,200 employees, 1,- 
800 pieces of equipment, and 37 termi- 
nals from Atlanta to Boston. Highway 
operations are presently conducted in the 
District of Columbia and the states of 
Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Mary- 
land, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New 
York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, 
Rhode Island, South Carolina and Vir- 
ginia. Terminals and offices are located 
in principal cities, including the ports 
of Baltimore, Boston, Charleston, S. C, 
New York, Philadelphia, Providence and 
Wilmington, N. C. 

McLean Trucking Company had total 
assets as of December 31, 1953 of $11,- 
614,894.66. The new "Sea-Land" operation 
will require acquisition of additional op- 
erating property and working capital, 
which will increase the total assets of the 
company by approximately $50,000,000. 

McLean Trucking Company will con- 
tinue its conventional over-the-road motor 
freight operations. The "Sea-Land" serv- 
ice will be in addition to, and co-ordinated 
with, the present land operation. Conven- 
tional water carrier operations performed 
by S. C. Loveland Company, Inc. will be 
continued. In addition, other phases of 
co-ordinated motor-water service will be 
investigated and developed to the extent 
found practical. It is expected that all 
employees of the Loveland Company, in- 
cluding its manager, will accept employ- 
ment with McLean Trucking Company, 
Water Carrier Division, upon consumma- 
tion of the acquisition and merger. 

Upon consummation of the merger, Mc- 
Lean Trucking Company will offer East- 
ern seaboard shippers the completely in- 
tegrated and co-ordinated facilities of a 
modern motor freight carrier, a conven- 
tional coastwise shipping service, and a 
combination of the two in its new "Sea- 
Land" service. 



MOREHEAD CITY 
PILOT'S ASS'N. 

State and Federal 
Licensed Pilots 



DEPENDABLE 
EFFICIENT 



PHONE 6-3292 
P. O. BOX 185 

MOREHEAD CITY 
NORTH CAROLINA 



JOINS SPA 

(Continued from Page 4) 

"Promotion of Tarheel ports is our ma- 
jor target," Adams said. "We have unique 
services to offer, and we are out to sell 
them wherever they can be used. 

"The improvements the state and oth- 
ers have in recent years brought about 
in North Carolina's deep water port i 
have made them into increasingly import- 
ant sea gateways," Adams said. "Their 
greater facility for service is not limited 
to North Carolina but extends to other 
territories to the West, South and North, 
which the ports can serve. Adequate sea- 
ports are of deepest concern and are im- 
portant to the entire world of trade am 
commerce." 

"It is therefore a major objective of 
the State Ports Authority to acquaint 
North Carolina, America and the world 
of trade with the facilities which are be- 
ing- developed to enable a more profitable 
flow of commerce to and from world mar- 
kets. We intend to show all concerned the 
advantages our harbors now offer in the 
way of economic export and import." 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

TELEPHONE 6-4652 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 



William T. Davis 

Manager 



Peter B. Ruffin W. P. Emerson W. D. Williams J. P. Wilson 

President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder Registration No, 376 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 




Member 

Federal Deposit 

Insurance Corporation 

WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



CONLY RETIRES 



T. A. LOVING 

AND 

COMPANY 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 




Builders of SPA Terminal at 
Morehead City 

Goldsboro, 
North Carolina 



(Continued from Page 5) 

one secretary, constituted the staff dur- 
ing the years the $7,500,000 ports bond 
issue was promoted throughout the state 
and passed by the legislature, and then 
through the long time during which the 
state's marine terminals were under con- 
struction at Wilmington and Morehead 
City. 

"I am very sorry Mr. Conly is leaving 
us," Colonel Marr said. "He is a fine 
gentleman, and we will certainly miss his 
service. 

Before Mr. Conly came to Wilmington 
in 1909 he was a newspaperman in his 
native Philadelphia, and his writing abili- 
ty was not lost through the years. He 
wrote a history of traffic on the Cape 
Fear River in 1930 for the Wilmington 
Morning Star; a treatise on North Caro- 
lina ports for a London journal in 1951, 
and has carefully chronicled the progress 
of the State Ports Authority. In 1952, 
when the Wilmington terminal was being 
dedicated. Mr. Conly made the following 
prediction at that time: 

"While I have seen the Noi'th Carolina 
coast in many stages of its development," 
Conly said as dedication day for the new 
state ports facility approached, "I be- 
lieve the establishment of deep water 
terminals by the State here and at More- 
head City will prove the most significant 
single step we have taken to benefit the 
whole economy of the state. There is 
scarcely an industry or activity which 
will not eventually benefit from lower 
freight rates for a wide range of com- 
modities, and every section of the terri- 
tory these ports will serve will feel the 
beneficial effects before much time has 
past. 

"I am thoroughly convinced" the assist- 
ant director declared," that having at 
Wilmington the most modern terminals 
the Atlantic Coast can boast will prove 
an attraction to ocean commerce which 
will benefit every other shipping facility 
in the Port of Wilmington." 



1953 Harbor Activities 
Show Upward Trend 

Wilmington Harbor commerce activities 
for 195.'3, indicate a definite trend up- 
ward despite a cargo increase of only 
20,000 tons over the preceding- year. 

Traffic of all types for the year end- 
ing' December 31 totaled 4,095,635 tons 
as compared with 4,075,17:3 tons for 1952. 

These statistics, released by the Wil- 
mington District of the Corps of Engi- 
neers, are preliminary and do not be- 
come official until published in the Corps' 
annual report. 

Of total tonnage handled, petroleum 
products accounted for better than half 
with 2,878,336 tons. Some 2,590,244 tons 
of petroleum represent coastwise ship- 
ments originating- at Louisiana and Tex- 
as ports. 

Various elements of fertilizer amount- 
ed to 259,909 tons. Other totals are: 
pulpwood 509,793 tons, 210,537 tons pa- 
per, (through shipment) and 50,204 tons 
of sugar. 

Relative to foreign traffic, imports 
amounted to 198,792 tons and exports 
25,801 tons; the latter including 12,480 
tons of tobacco, 11,730 tons of cotton 



seed meal and 1,541 tons of dried milk. 

During the 12-month period, a total of 
342 vessels of all types were recorded; 
205 steamships, 30 motor ships, 29 tugs 
and 18 barges. 

Traffic activities comprising the report 
embrace all commerce handling at Wil- 
mington, Southport and intermediate 
points. 

Southport, for instance, grossed a take 
of 21,002 tons of menhaden fish, the 
products of which, direct and by-product, 
are almost limitless. 

The seafood catch, major portion of 
which is centered about Southport, was 
only 809 tons, including shrimp and edible 
fish. This figure falls considerably below 
normal expected production. 

Shrimping interests reported that the 
past season was the "poorest in 20 years." 
Normally, Southport enjoys prosperous 
shrimp takes from July until late fall. 
In fact, Southport is recognized as the 
leading shrimp producing section of the 
State. 

Water-borne commerce statistics are 
assembled and compiled monthly by the 
Washington, N. C, sub-office of the Wil- 
mington District. This office is responsi- 
ble for collecting- and recording informa- 
tion of this nature for all of North Caro- 
lina. 



GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK. N. Y. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE — WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of Steamsh'p Piers, 
Railroad Trestles and Bridges and Heavv Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and to abrasion. It is particularly 

suitable for flooring, bulkheads, dolphins, rubbing posts, etc. 



H. B. LUDLUM & SONS 

COMPLETE LINE: 

SALVAGE AND NEW BUILDING MATERIALS 
SHIP DUNNAGE AND CRATING 

TELEPHONE 3-2634 

Carolina Beach Road & Raleigh Street 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



PUSHES MOREHEAD 




L. B. Jenkins of Kinston, is one of the leading 
Tarheel tobacco exporters who are pushing 
Morehead City as a leai export center. He is 
president of the L. B. Jenkins Tobacco Company. 




CONCRETE 
COMPANY 



2814 Monroe St. 

WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 





HYMAN 


SUPPLY COMPANY 








"E 


verything for the Mill" 

— DISTRIBUTORS OF — 








INDUSTRIAL AND PLUMBING SUPPLIES 








PAINTS 


AND HEAVY HARDWARE 

BRANCHES: 






HYMAN 


SUPPLY CO., Fayet 


eville, N. C. — SUMTER SUPPLY CO., Sumler, S. 


c. 




TEL. 5294 




WILMINGTON. 


N. 


C. 



WILMINGTON IRON WORKS, Inc. 

Established 1838 

MANUFACTURERS, JOBBERS, AND DISTRIBUTORS 

ENGINEERS — FOUNDERS — MACHINISTS 
AND BOILERMAKERS 

ELECTRIC AND OXY ACETYLENE WELDING 

GRAY IRON — BRASS — SEMI-STEEL CASTINGS 

MARINE AND MILL SUPPLIES 

WILMINGTON. NORTH CAROLINA 



GET INTO THIS PICTURE THRU 
OUR MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 




Complete Banking Service for Every Particular Need 

MEMBER OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 

First-Citizens Bank & Trust Company 

Norlh Carolina 
Telephone 6-4151 



HEIDE & CO., Inc. 

LICENSED CUSTOM HOUSE BROKERS 
STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 

Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Samplers — Sworn Weighers 



yo-s AGtr^, 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 223 

CABLE ADDRESS "HEIDE" WILMINGTON - CAROLINA 
Tel. 35161 



POSTMASTER: " not delivered in 10 days, re- 
turn to Box 1048, State Ports Authority, 
Wilmington, N. C. Return Postage Guaranteed. 



RALEIGH, N.C. 



Sec. 34.66. P. 


L. & R. 


U. S. Postage 


PAID 




Wilmington, 


N. C. 


Permit No. 


225 





CARTERET 

MOREHEAD 


TOWING CO, 

CITY. NORTH CAROLII 


„ Inc. 

IA 

HARBOR AND 

INTERCOASTAL 

WATERWAY 

TOWING 

Rates on Request 

P. O. BOX 185 
PHONE 6-3292 








„„^...—- „:'-w-.:--: — ii;'..;-..-.' :, '''™HnlWlMi 



Atlantic and East Carolina 
Railroad Company 

SERVING THE PORT OF MOREHEAD CITY 

Big Enough To Do The Job . . . Yet Small Enough 
To Take A Personal Interest In Each Shipper 




N. C. S. P. A. Terminal, Port of Morehead City 

NEW BERN, NORTH CAROLINA 



_># 




NOVEMBER 1954 



NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY VMIAS', 



North C»rol4 $t»t» Ubf*r> 
falltf) 







r ■ P-ni 

■!■ 'IB II 

Hj^^ ^Ji ' B 

^^ Bi -B^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^j^L^^jB 


ffotitU (Pct/wlirvcu 


■iiiiiajni^i 



ftlotekeaoC Gtfy 



HEIDE & CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 



V 0YD'S AG£r* Cy 



Cable Address 

"HEIDE" MOREHEADCITY-CAROLINA 

P. O. Box 322 

Telephone 6-3652 

R. L. HICKS, Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY. NORTH CAROLINA 




PETER B. RUFFIN, President 
W. D. WILLIAMS, Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON, Vice-President 
J. P. WILSON, Treasurer 



Wilmington Shipping Company 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 270 
Telephone 2-3381 



Cable Address 
WILSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



THE BANK OF 


WILMINGTON 


MEMBER 


FEDERAL DEPOSIT 


INSURANCE CORPORATION 


XP3t\ 




X£jT^X 




WILMINGTON 


NORTH CAROLINA 



PAVING CONTRACTORS 

Any Size Job Anywhere 

E. B. TOWLES 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

DIAL 2-0359 
Market Street Road 





ASPHALT 
CONCRETE 

AND 
BITUMINOUS 

SURFACE 
TREATMENT 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 



November, 1954 



Volume 1, No. 4 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

EDWIN PATE 

Chairman 

RAYMOND A. BRYAN 
V ice-Chairman 

W. AVERY THOMPSON 

Secretary-Treasurer 

J. HARRY WHITE 
Member 

HARVEY W. MOORE 

Member 

HAROLD F. COFFEY 
Member 

Executive Director 
COL. RICHARD S. MARR 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

GEORGE T. ADAMS 

Asst. to Director 

E. E. LEE, JR. 

Traffic Manager 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

P. O. Box 1619— Telephone 3-1622 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN 

Terminal Manager 



(contents 



The Economy of Home Ports 2 

King Cotton Returns to Wilmington _ 3 

Tobacco Gateways to the World 4 

Bon Voyage 6 

Tar Heel Native Assists in Promotion of North Carolina 

Ports in South America —-7 

What Others Say 8 

State Port Activities 10 

Visitors to State Ports 12 

Four Part Harmony 14 

State Ports Can Be Educational Too 15 

Maritime Commerce Benefits All States 17 

Port Facilities, Wilmington -18 

Port Facilities, Morehead City 19 

Rail Rates - 20 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

P. O. Box 14 5— Telephone 6-3159 

J. D. HOLT 

Terminal Manager 

WALTER H. FRIEDERICHS 
Assistant 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

39 Broadway, Wing 618 

New York 6, N. Y. 

WILLIAM S. CHILDRESS 
Commercial Agent 



COVER 

The trim freighter S/S ST/ Tf SURVEYOR shown on the 
cover was photographed at four minutes after she ./ocL./ at 
Wilmington State Port to unload the first cargo of imported 
cotton into Surth Carolina through the *>/,;/, Ports. I he 
STEEL SURVEYOR ;s one of the man} ships o\ the Isthmian 
Steamship Company that raw calls to the port. 



ike O 



conomxi o 



v 



During the past few months many Tar Heel busi- 
ness men who deal in imported and exported goods, 
made statements to the effect that it was good economy 
not only for themselves but for the state as a whole, 
to do their shipping through North Carolina's State 
Ports. 

Recently, one of the State's leading lumber dealers 
remarked, "Because of efficient handling and unload- 
ing of my imported mahogany from the Philippines at 
the North Carolina State Port, I realize not only a 
saving to myself but also to the furniture industry and 
all those connected with us in using our stock." 

In addition to such specific things as savings, the 
people of North Carolina directly benefit whenever a 
ship enters a State Port for taking on or discharging 
goods. Cargoes coming into North Carolina are handl- 
ed by local people and then, for shipment into the 
state, the railroads and truck lines are put to use. This 
means that engineers, brakemen, truck drivers, helpers, 
the use of freight cars, locomotives and trucks, the 
fuels required to operate these pieces of equipment all 
have been employed beyond their usual scope. 

Some months ago a dealer in hardware began to im- 
port through the State Ports and because of the lower 
costs in price resulting from efficient handling, no loss 
of time and the shorter distances to his consumers, this 
importer was able to sell his commodity at a price that 
was below his nearest competitor. This saving was 
passed on to hardware dealers, contractors and builders, 
carpenters and the man who works around the house. 

The other day, a representative of the C & G Trad- 
ing Corp., which handles huge cargoes of burlap and 
webbing, said "The two main reasons I bring my goods 
through the State Port are that I have saved my com- 
pany time and money and that this saving can be pass- 
ed along to our customers." 

More and more Tar Heel industries are being made 
aware that shipping through home ports is good busi- 
ness; not only that, they are being made aware of the 
fact that the services provided by the State Ports do not 
only benefit the industry but directly and indirectly 
benefit the people as a whole. 

Everyone in North Carolina, in a sense, is really an 
ambassador of good will for the State Ports Authority, 
for they are the peoples' ports and whatever develops at 
the State Ports level for increased activity eventually 
benefits the people. 



I Home Potts 



During the -printing of this booklet, the 
State Ports Authority learned with sadness 
of the passing of a dear friend and long 
time supporter of the ports of North Caro- 
lina. 

Mr. L. B. Jenkins, of the L. B. Jenkins 
Tobacco Co., of Kinston, xvas always ready 
to assist in the promotion of ports. Just a 
few days ago he gave of his time and self 
to express his strong feelings toward the 
State Ports in the enclosed story, "Tobacco 
Gateways to the World." 

To his wife and family, the State Ports 
Authority and staff extend their deepest 
sympathies — and as a tribute to his spirit 
and determination — this November edition 
of the State Ports Publication is dedicated 
to his never to be forgotten loyalty to the 
State Ports, the State of North Carolina 
and the Nation. 



The North Carolina State Terminal at Morehead 
City is only 3-and-a-half miles from the sea buoy. 



When ships dock at the North Carolina State Ports, 
Wilmington and Morehead City, upon request they 
can have inland telephone service installed in a mat- 
ter of minutes. 



The New York Marine News stated that, "every 
completed port, such as the State Ports of North Caro- 
lina, is an added national asset." 



The harbor and channel improvements, such as the 
North Carolina State Ports have, helped to make 
America great and strong. 



RETURNS^TO 
WILMINGTON 




Not too many North Carolinians are around today 
who can remember when Wilmington, North Carolina 
was one of the leading cotton shipping centers of the 
world. However, there are many who today say: "Wil- 
mington is on its way to becoming a leading imported 
cotton receiving center for the South." 

These remarks came about recently when the first 
cargoes of imported cotton arrived at the North Caro- 
lina State Docks at Wilmington. 

These cargoes of cotton from Egypt were the first 
ever to be received at the State Docks — and more is 
expected, to supply the needs of North Carolina tex- 
tile manufacturers. 

The State Ports are moving progressively along with 
the Old North State — so that they can provide the 
services to fulfill the needs of textile manufacturers of 
North Carolina, which today leads the nation in the 
textile industry. 

Leading textile manufacturers of North Carolina, 
along with brokers and buyers of cotton, were very 
helpful in cooperating with the State Ports Authority in 
obtaining the cotton shipments. 

In order to provide the best services in handling 
imported cotton, the State Ports Authority constructed 
a fumigation plant, which is considered by experts to 
be the most modern on the East Coast. This plant, 
which is an addition to the other modern port facilities 
at Wilmington, has two chambers of 7,225 cubic feet 
each and is equipped for either HCN or Methyl Bro- 
mide treatment. Each chamber is 76'9" long, 9'6" 
wide and 10' high, with a capacity of 160 bales of 
cotton or 56 hogsheads of tobacco. Tractor-drawn 



trailers cut down handling to a minimum and expedite 
the movements in loading and unloading the chambers. 
As a chamber is unloaded by this system, it is immedi- 
ately reloaded by another train of loaded trailers, thus 
insuring speed of handling and flexibility of move- 
ment. 

In an official announcement to the cotton trade, the 
Isthmian Steamship Company in part advised that "As 
a service to the cotton industry we are offering in ad- 
dition to our regular scheduled service from Alex- 
andria, Egypt a direct call at Wilmington, North Caro- 
lina." Wilmington is the first port of call that this com- 
pany makes upon the arrival of ships from Egypt and 
India. 

In view of what is happening, the State Ports Au- 
thoritv looks to the future with complete confidence, 
that increased imported cotton shipments into Wilming- 
ton will result from the cooperative work of organiza- 
tions and individuals who have been making everv ef- 
fort to increase the use of North Carolina's ports in the 
cotton trade. The importers of the first cotton cargo 
have been high in their praise of the service given 
them, concerning the shipment, sampling, weighing, 
fumigation and shipping. 

The proximity of the State Docks at Wilmington to 
the textile distributing ami manufacturing centers in 
North Carolina and bordering interior states is of par- 
ticular importance. This is especially important today 

( londnued on Page 16) 




Tobacco Gateways TO THE WORLD 



Many thousands of hogsheads of tobacco pass 
through North Carolina State Ports. 

The export of tobacco — one of the major factors 
in the economic stability of North Carolina's agricul- 
tural industry — is on the increase through North 
Carolina State Ports. 

In the past few weeks, during the annual market- 
ing season, more than 25,000 hogsheads of leaf were 
shipped to foreign customer nations — from Wilming- 
ton. At present and for the next months, additional 
cargoes will leave from the Morehead City State Ocean 
Terminal. 

The exporting of tobacco from America began long 
before the pilgrims stepped ashore on Plymouth Rock. 
Even since colonial days, it has been a major item 
among our exports and as it was then is still now. 

From throughout North Carolina, during the past 
weeks, the golden leaf arrived by rail and truck trans- 
ports to the State Docks, then unloaded into the modern 
transit sheds, constructed of concrete, steel and mason- 
ry with sprinkler and deluge systems. Loading into and 
out of sheds, the hogsheads are handled on a mech- 
anized basis with heavy lift trucks that are used for 
fast transfer from freight cars, trucks to sheds and 
shipside, and stacking. 

The transit sheds are adjacent to ship-loading areas, 
which makes for prompt and labor saving handlings, 
that results in cost-savings. 



There are other economies to North Carolina's tobac- 
co industry resulting from shipping through North 
Carolina State Ports: one in particular is the short 
distances to the ports from their redrying plants. 

One of the leading tobacco men in North Carolina, 
L. B. Jenkins, says: "By having tobacco shipped from 
the redrying plants in my area of business, a great deal 
of time and money is saved, because of the shorter 
distance to the Morehead City terminal as compared 
to the ports north of Morehead City. This short haul 
permits trucks to make, in many cases, two hauls per 
day, whereas a truckload going to the next northern 
port usually requires a day and a half. You can readily 
see that not only time and money are saved, but that 
speed is a factor which also results in using the State 
Ocean Terminal at Morehead City. 

"These benefits are only a portion of benefits that 
directly and indirectly affect many people in North 
Carolina, and other industries, because of my use of 
the State Port. As an example, truck lines hauling our 
tobacco to the State Port increase their employment us- 
age. When we speak of trucks we think of truck driv- 
ers, the helpers, the warehousemen and others who are 
put to work because of that truck load of tobacco be- 
ing loaded or unloaded. This cycle continues, for the 
more trucks that are used, the more fuel is consumed. 
This affects the petroleum and gasoline distributors of 
our state, as well as results in additional tax revenue 
for the State of North Carolina. 



"When tobacco is being shipped by rail freight, there 
again additional work is being provided the railroads, 
which means engineers, brakemen and equipment. The 
loading and unloading of these freight cars and the 
loading of tobacco aboard ships also utilizes stevedores 
and dock workers. These people are all native to North 
Carolina, and all that results from the shipment of to- 
bacco from the North Carolina tobacco areas to the 
North Carolina State Ports, means that increases have 
been made to the economy of these people and to the 
economy to our state. If even that increase was a small 
one, it does help increase the standard of living and 
helps bring more prosperity to many areas. 

"I could go on explaining additional benefits that 
result by my shipping tobacco through State Ports, such 
as the various charges that the ship must make when 
she enters our ports — harbor fees, custom duties, food, 
laundry service, water, the use of taxi-cabs and other 
commodities that small businesses sell — that result in 
additional revenue to those businesses. 

"At the present time the rail rates from Wilson, 
Rocky Mount, Farmville, Greenville, and Kinston to 
Morehead are less than they are to ports north of us. 
I have been assured by the traffic manager of the At- 
lantic & East Carolina Railway that the rates from 
the producing points will be the same to Morehead 
as to Wilmington, and that the rate from Kinston to 
Morehead City will be considerably lower than the rate 
to Wilmington, that, of course, will be an additional 
saving in transportation. 



"In summing up all I have said, it means that ship- 
ping tobacco through North Carolina not only benefits 
tobacco companies in time and money saved, but also 
indirectly benefits the people involved and the state as 
a whole: and what applies to tobacco also applies to 
other cargoes. The above facts that I have mentioned 
are my actual experiences, which I have witnessed 
through my own shipments. 

"I would like all to know that myself and manv 
other tobacco men of this state are doing all we can to 
increase our export shipments of tobacco through the 
State Ports of North Carolina." 

The careful handling of tobacco is another factor to 
be considered in the services provided b\ the State- 
Ports. Such services usuallv result in comments such as 
the following: "The last shipment of tobacco that I 
had shipped and delivered arrived in the best condition 
and with the least damage of any lot ever discharged in 
Bremen, Germany." This was told to the Operation 
Manager at the Morehead Citv State Ocean Terminal, 
by J. W. Fahl, who is associated with the consignee and 
owner of the Motor Ship GLORIA, of Bremen, Ger- 
many. 

North Carolina leads the nation in the growth of 
flue-cured tobacco and in the manufacture of tobacco 
products, so it is only natural for tobacco to be im- 
portant in the export trade for the State Ports of North 
Carolina. 




&h U 



vcxjace . . . 

NORTH CAROLINA'S NEWEST INDUSTRY 



The ocean travel business has come to North Caro- 
lina. Thousands of people swarmed to the Morehead 
City State Ocean Terminal on Sunday, October 1 7th, 
to watch the M. S. Stockholm sail with 400 passengers 
aboard for a vacation cruise to Nassau and Cuba. 

The glamorous and luxurious Stockholm, dazzling 
in the bright sunlight, sailed on the first of a series of 
cruises from Morehead City. Three additional cruises 
are scheduled to sail during the months of October 
and November. 

Flags were flying high, the Morehead City High 
School Band played sharp military music, the docks 
were crowded with friends and families staging a 
grand celebration. 

Most of the 400 passengers were Tar Heels, and 
many were members of the North Carolina Academy of 
General Practice, which held its annual meeting 
aboard the vessel. Also, among the passengers were 
people who came from 1 5 other states including Iowa, 
South Dakota, Kentucky, Maryland, Pennsylvania, 
New York, Ohio, Delaware, Alabama, Georgia, New 
Jersey, Illinois, and others. 

State Ports Authority officials were pleased with the 
smoothness of operations, and agree with travel ex- 
perts that vacation cruises from this port will become a 
new commodity for North Carolina. 

These predictions have been made because of the 
proximity of North Carolina Ports to the Bahamas 
and Cuba, and thousands of people in North Carolina 



and the bordering interior states find the North Caro- 
lina coast easily reached by car, train, plane or bus, 
and are cognizant of the fact that parking is not a 
problem — cars are parked within walking distance of 
shipside. 

The Stockholm, with the sleek lines of a yacht, is 
525 feet long and can cruise at a speed of 19 knots, 
and has a crew of 300. 

All supplies and provisions for the sailing were pur- 
chased in North Carolina. During the trip about four 
tons of food will be consumed daily. 

The vessel itself requires 45 tons of fuel oil and a 
half ton of lubricating oil every twenty-four hours. 

The many attractions, both historical and quaint, 
along the eastern coast of North Carolina are within 
short driving distances of the sailing area; all of this, 
plus the year round ideal climate of the coast, does 
forecast the coming of a bright future. 

Dr. John R. Bender of Winston-Salem, Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Academy, who represented Governor 
William B. Umstead at the pre-sailing ceremonies, 
said, "This cruise is an ambitious undertaking: it is 
more than just a convention of doctors or a meeting, it 
will demonstrate the advantages of North Carolina as 
a port of embarkation for trans-Atlantic passenger 
liners." 

The new vacation project of the State Ports had the 
City of Morehead preparing for it for some time and 
they are convinced that ocean cruises from their city is 
a new industry for the State of North Carolina. 





lah. Heel Tlatioe ClssisU in Promotion ok Hath (^alolina 
(>tate Pats in ^ycutk ClmeUca 



Phifer P. Rothman, formerly of Chapel Hill, North 
Carolina, now a director of the Central Cultural, 
Brasil-Estados Unidos (The Cultural Center of the 
United States of Brazil), with offices in Santos, 
Brazil, has been very helpful to the North Carolina 
State Ports. 

Rothman has been in close correspondence with 
the State Ports Authority over a period of months, and 
through his office in Santos has projected the facili- 
ties and services of the North Carolina State Ports. 
During the past few months he circulated an exhibi- 
tion of photographs of the facilities of the State Ports 
throughout the country of Brazil. Ibis exhibit is being 
currently shown at the Sindicate Portuario de Santos 
(Port Syndicate of Santos). In line with this endeavor, 
he also had published in many of the newspapers 
throughout Brazil stories of the North Carolina State 
Ports and their facilities and services. All of the 
material forwarded to Rothman also assisted the Com- 
panhia Docas de Santos, which is in complete charge 



of all port facilities in Santos, in studying the modern 
port facilities of North Carolina for the purpose of 
determining the methods and equipment that might 
be utilized there. 

Their use of the information about the North Caro- 
lina State Ports is also being helpful to the State Ports, 
because the officials, who made the study, are the 
men who have constant contact with local shipping 
firms, and, therefore, are likely to comment to the 
shippers about the modern facilities of the ports in 
North Carolina. 

The St.ite Ports Authority salutes its native son, 
and, .is a thank-you gesture for all that he is doing, is 
granting a request made by Rothman. He will, in the 
next few days, receive a handful of good North Caro 
Una soil from the Chapel Hill area, which will be 
enclosed in a sealed plastic container. He shall always 
have some of the Tar Heel earth close to him. even 
though he is main thousands of miles .iw.n from 
home. 



stof es «»{ t0M . IeflSMre if «H 

City of W*b ' »-j j hc a *&*?& services and 
"Sailing «""'' ... s provided ™ e " } Carolina 
ports and P°« C ™ $ given by the North 

P ° r S ' Awards Echanc 
yrMONTE I3IM 



"This /inw bin'/t its j'/ant at the Morehead City 
Terminal in 1949 and since then the plant has 
been in continuous operation, and the growth of 
our business has necessitated additions from time 
to time in order to take care of the ever-increas- 
ing demands of our customers." Just last week 
this company announced an additional increase 
of facilities, to the amount of 125,000,000 gal- 
lons capacity of additional tanks for storage of 
asphalt. This meant construction workers were 
employed and the plant staff will be increased 
as the new facilities are put into operation. This 
company also said, "The low transportation costs 
associated with tanker deliveries, together with 
the streamlined Port and production facilities 
which our company has at its Morehead City 
plant arc major contributing factors in keeping 
North Carolina's road paving costs at a minimum." 
Trumbull Asphalt Co. 
Morehead City, N. C. 



made'""* *» retu r7 J"™" '"ore 7 " 8 'l Clt,t «ral 
head r ""Ports thrZ' iK e *Wfo*7 profit to the 
™cha% mea «stkT 8 t i Wi ?»»Won7f™ be 
sol <l to S t £ e Product" r * e ma ^facurT/ Mo ^- 
** turn de , ale r at a* ° re **Po3Z? articl e> 

J^ Jo ^ r^ * ^ui Pmcm Co 



„ r c P A means additional ship- 
•■mturally, the S. P.A- rmans ^ 

ping to this state. These new t .^ QW 

State Ports a How fo r tore np ^ m 

state ^d a ho help brmg in import ant 

that is left within the state ^ ^ he 

to not only tne , hc toTTSte money to pay for 
state, because the < ortg in of he™ Udered the 
all the various ^^"^sfrom outside of the 
vessel and its ^°' ^sluices comes from out- 
community and ™™ostinstan h t a full 

stores, restaurants ^^ustkeev in mind that tins 
"hi conclusion we must kcp .^ t] 

money paid by the J »P w « ™ a nt factor is the 

hands of others but the ™£ $50;00 more 

SyXrAS^ the Victory ship came 

up the river. 

Wm. Bcane, Pres. 

Heide Shipping Co. N< c . 

Wilmington and Moreneaa 



"It is our intention to route all future ship- 
ments to the Carolina-Virginia territory through 
Wilmington whenever space is available to your 
Port, because our past experience was that the 
handling was not only superior, but resulted in a 
worthwhile saving in delivery time, as well as a 
reduction in cost for our customers and ourselves. 

"The Carolina-Virginia territory is one of our 
most important markets, and with thoughtful co- 
operation we look forward to a steady and sub- 
stantial tonnage movement through Wilmington 
for many years to come." 
E. N. Beard 
Beard Lumber Co. 
Greensboro, N. C. 






What Otltete £a\f 






Smms 

Soods and , me «ns of 1 ! ' /v u s«ally ch ea t' 
country a , °%f r «»»»,<>, „£""* ™«nufaci ] 
f " c ""- that „ " s "> those o7th° marke * It 

g e fartme n t of r ? °^ Cfa *£ 

Ral eigh) jv. £ Co ^crva f i „ & - , 
^ • JJcvc 'opmcnt 



"T/ic very life of the burlap business with us 
is dependent upon bringing in our burlap from 
India and Europe direct to the Port of Wilmington 
instead of to Norfolk, Charleston and Savannah, 
as we have had to do many times in the past, for 
it not only results in more employment and a bet- 
ter payroll for this community but also enables us 
to pass along to users in the Carolinas a saving in 
the purchase price of their bags and burlap." 
S. L. Marbury 
Werthiemer Bag Co. 
Wilmington, N. C. , 



through W« »' % HH j reasons. I J* an d V eo- 

business w»» J u ,i IC „ ne« scverfl i oc 



RllM S^rtUit to your jo X i M«g 
nisio'^ our J"" , s torflge ""' " ' j <m<! « s 
fSlvful. Third' *> ^ ficie ntly "'«»-, ?'„ s ing <'"' 

sj&S&ftS* 5 "- " 

wonaerrui c< 

gr f.u-l flt H Montgomery 
Wm, 1 V uur Corp. 
MiUorcl, i^" 



Bnioflfiff De Nen ">«" & Co. 




;iS^^^sfi£ 



STATE POR1 




aaa 



ACTIVITIES 




SUGAR 




Vkitete to £tate Pohk 




BERMUDAN IS PLEASED 
WITH SPA FACILITIES 

A young Bermudan came to Wilmington to 
see if he could get some folks to go to Bermuda. 

John G. Young, official representative of the 
governor of Bermuda, was in Wilmington re- 
cently as part of a tour to boost tourist travel to 
his native land. 

Young, who visited the State Ports Authority, 
travel agencies, and business and civic leaders, 
said he would like to see more Bermuda-bound 
cruise boats leaving from North Carolina ports. 

He planned to visit Raleigh to invite Gov. Wil- 
liam Umstead to visit Bermuda. 

While in Raleigh, Young hoped to confer with 
the State Board of Conservation and Develop- 
ment. He is a member of the Bermuda Trade De- 
velopment Board. 

In the first trips to this part of the United 
States, Young commented: "I was greatly im- 
pressed by Wilmington and the new facilities of 
the SPA here." 



LT. GOVERNOR 
LUTHER H. HODGES 

Lt. Governor Luther H. Hodges 
spent a morning touring the fa- 
cilities of the Wilmington State 
Docks with Director, Colonel 
Richard S. Marr. 

The purpose of his visit was to 
get first-hand information about 
the ports' operation and some of 
the needs for additional equip- 
ment and facilities. 



12 




JUAN MIRANDA 
Cuban Consul 
from 
Winston-Salem 



PHILIP L. SULLIVAN 



JUAN MIRANDA 



E. E. LEE, JR. 



Juan Miranda, Cuban Consul from Winston-Salem, toured the State Ports 
Authority Docks a few days ago, to develop commercial relations between State 
Ports Authority and Cuba. He said he was much impressed with the State Ports 
Authority facilities and added, "I'll be back many more times.'' He is pictured with 
Philip L. Sullivan, Operations Manager and E. E. Lee, Jr., Traffic Manager. 



HANNS RODE, ECONOMIC ADVISOR TO THE 

ATLANTA CONSULATE OF THE FEDERAL 

REPUBLIC OF GERMANY 

Hanns Rode made a one-day stop in Wilmington 
while on a business tour of the state. 

The West German representative made this visit in 
an effort to arrange trade between North Carolina and 
his country. The Atlanta Consulate represents West 
Germany and West Berlin. 

The State Ports Authority assisted Rode in advising 
all business firms and individuals presently engaged 
in trade with West Germany or interested in starting 
trade to contact him through the State Ports Authority. 

Rode said last year the United States purchased 
about $300 million of goods from West Germany and 
he feels this amount could be greatly expanded. 

Following a tour of the modern State Ports, Rode 
was a speaker at a luncheon meeting arranged by Ma- 
yor E. L. White, so that Rode could meet with the 
city's economic advisory committee, business repre- 
sentatives, bankers and others. 



Upon leaving, Rode said, "I look to the day soon 
when we can make more use of your modern and very 
impressive-looking State Ports facilities." 



DR. W. BRUECKMANN, GERMAN CONSUL, 

CONSULATE OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC 

OF GERMANY, ATLANTA 

Dr. Brueckmann visited the State Ports for the pur- 
pose of gathering all possible information on shipping 
facilities for this country, with an eye to increasing 
shipping between the Par Heel State and Germain. 

llis statement upon leaving was, "My government is 
\er\ much interested in your facilities, ami lor your 
plans lor the near Future. It was indeed very kind of 
you lo show me the modern and beautiful installation 
of the North Carolina State Port at Wilmington. It 

was a most interesting experience." 



13 



"Icui 



Pad H 



aimon 



v 



Shortly before the Carolina Power & Light Company 
dedicated its newest and largest steam generator plant 
on October 21st, near Wilmington, North Carolina, 
they printed and distributed a pamphlet entitled "Four- 
Part Harmony." 

This pamphlet pointed out to the industries of the 
United States that are potentially planning to locate 
in this area, and also to the many industries that may 
be induced to locate in this area, the many factors 
that produce profits for industries. 

These factors are each a part of a Four-Part Har- 
mony, one of which is Labor, and in this area, it was 
pointed out, there is a veritable manpower pool of 
skilled and unskilled workers. People who are home 
and farm owners in small communities and the sur- 
rounding country areas. These people possess a high 
degree of native intelligence and dexterity which make 
for efficient training. They are also happy people. 

The second part of this harmonious blending is 
Materials. There are ample reserves for most industries 
and this has accounted for the steady expansion of 
manufacturing and processing in North Carolina, an 
area that holds the national top ranking in the manu- 
facture of textiles and textile products, tobacco and 
tobacco products. It also ranks high nationally as a 
producer of wood pulp, furniture, lumber, paper, 
bricks and tile and its timberlands are plentiful in re- 
serve. 

Location is another factor that makes for industrial 
harmony. North Carolina, with its Mountain, Pied- 
mont and Coastal areas, offers a wide variety of in- 
dustrial sites as well as a variety of climates. 



The fourth and final part of this quartet is the 
Markets: fast freight facilities can serve better than 
60% of the domestic markets within 72 hours; more 
than 1,000 motor transport operators, of which 48 are 
Class One, are ready to serve over the road; the service 
of 1 5 airports; the bus lines; and the added services of 
the railroads, all make for fast pathways to marketing 
areas. 

Also included in this four-part harmony that makes 
for industrial profits are the shipping points on the in- 
land waterways, plus the two modern deep water ports 
of North Carolina, located at Wilmington and More- 
head City. Their geographical location and the trans- 
portation facilities they offer are important factors to 
those industries that import and export finished pro- 
ducts or raw materials throughout the world. The 
Ports of North Carolina are gateways to all the mar- 
kets of the world that can be reached by water. In 
addition to that, the low cost of water transportation 
shows that it is still one of the most economical forms 
of transportation known. 

The North Carolina State Ports are proud to be a 
part of this Four-Part Harmony, an action that dem- 
onstrates to industries why, through these basic re- 
quirements, margins of profit can be widened and 
because of a blending of these basic requirements 
there is a development for efficient production and 
maximum sales. The North Carolina State Ports Au- 
thority salutes the endeavors of the Carolina Power 
& Light Company and sings the praises of its slogan, 
"Nothing could be finer than a site in Carolina" by 
adding also "Nothing could be finer than to ship 
through North Carolina Ports." 




•.. 


fifeX' 1 


p !■' tj 




KWr' : "\ »ll 



m 



pre 



. •#<• -"5- 



State 

Pats 

Caw 

& 

Ooucational 

IOC 





fill 



i "'lijxitfL 




Many hundreds of school students from the grade 
schools through colleges have often left the Ports of 
North Carolina starry-eyed and amazed with what 
they have seen. During the past few months, many 
students visited both ports to see the modern docks, 
ships from many lands and the various cargoes 
arriving and leaving for all parts of the world. The 
students come for many reasons. Some just come to 
see, others come to connect shipping with some of 
their courses and studies that they are undertaking in 
their respective schools. 

During patriotic holidays, when the State Ports 
are honored with a visit by a Navy vessel or two, stu- 
dents are usually invited aboard as guests. This invi- 
tation means a complete tour of a warship. They are 
guided throughout the entire ship, which till that 
time was a mystery. This tour usually ends up in the 
galley or bakc-shop, where cookies, cakes and other 
pastries are served. On this tour, you can see children 
climbing up and down ladders, being guided from one 
deck to another, learning about guns and the mysteries 
of radar and other complicated mechanisms that con- 
trol the ship wbile sailing; or, as one ten-year old said, 
"It's how they drive the ship." 

One of the stops aboard a Naval vessel is usually in 
the Map Room, where students arc taken on imaginary 
cruises to all parts of the world from the hot tropical 
countries to the Arctic Zones. 



In most cases, students are under the supervision 
of teachers and instructors who have made previous 
arrangements for these visits and it is a policy of the 
State Ports Authority to encourage these visits by chil- 
dren throughout the State of North Carolina. 

In many cases, where the time permits, the students 
are also taken for a tour of the docks. Thcv look into 
warehouses where cargoes arc stored for export, then 
they pass through transit sheds where they sec various 
commodities such as cotton from Egypt, burlap from 
India, hardware from Germany and Belgium, lumber 
from Honduras and the Philippines, woodpulp going 
to Argentina, dried milk going to children of the Unit- 
ed Nations throughout the world and at times the] 
see a cargo of monkeys arriving from India. At the 
close of one of these tours, an instructor stated. "My 
children received many lessons in education. They 
learned about other countries; they learned of the 
geography of other parts of the world; they learned 
some history and backgrounds of other countries; thcv 
learned the economics of shipping through North 
Carolina ports. They also learned some of the business 
of importing and exporting and that the North Caro- 
lina ports are big business for their state. But most of 
all they are learning that, here within the ports' areas, 
is an actual demonstration of the growth and progress 
of their state." 



15 



JCino Cotton Ketulns to Wum'mcton 

when merchants and manufacturers are carefully con- 
sidering all elements of cost in competitive situations 
that present themselves. 

North Carolina manufacturers are best served 
through the gateways of Wilmington and Morehead 
City. Not only when they ship manufactured articles 
to all world ports, but in addition by receiving their 
imported raw materials via North Carolina ports, 
their costs are kept at a minimum. 

While the natural advantages of the ports are suf- 
ficient to warrant this optimism, great effort is being 
made to add to the attractions of the ports to shippers 
and receivers of all classes of cargo. 

Two distinct lines of endeavor are being undertaken; 
first, improved and additional facilities, in addition to 
the modern facilities now available, and second, more 
attractive rates and lower costs. 



(Continued from Page 3) 

Shippers and receivers of textiles and raw cotton are 
being made cognizant of the advantages that accrue to 
them by direct, rail connections and on-the-site truck 
transport facilities. 

The Ports of North Carolina offer modern docks, 
transit sheds, warehousing, deep harbor channels and 
efficient handling. 

North Carolina's nearness to ports on the West 
Coast, Europe, South America and the Mediterranean, 
as compared with other Atlantic ports, means less time 
in transit, an important factor for shippers. 

These features, coupled with a driving desire on the 
part of all those serving the ports to render the best 
of service, presage a bright future for the Port of Wil- 
mington, North Carolina in the imported cotton ship- 
ping trade. 



WUat UtltetS $ya\i (Continued from Page 9) 



"There has been much said about the benefits 
the large industries of North Carolina receive 
from the State Ports Authority through their 
handling of import ayid export trade. Very seldom 
has mention been made of the benefits that small 
businesses in this area receive from the ships 
that dock at your terminal. 

"We, too, know of the great importance of the 
State owned terminals to the South Atlantic 
region but we also know of the importance of 
this terminal to us, a small industry in Wilming- 
ton. 

"Since the first ship docked at your terminal 
we have been supplying the laundry needs and 
dry cleaning service for ships' personnel and this 
business will amount to several thousand dol- 
lars each year. 

"Our plant employs an average of ninety-eight 
people, both white and colored, throughout the 
year, and we feel that with the ships' laundry and 
dry cleaning combined, we are supplying the sal- 
aries for at least ten people we would not have 
had without this additional business." 
E. S. Capps 

Ideal Laundry & Dry Cleaning 
Wilmington, N. C. 



"By having the tobacco shipped from the re- 
drying plants in my area of business, a great deal 
of time and money is saved, because of the short- 
er distance to the Morehead City State Terminal 



as compared to Norfolk, Virginia. This short haul 
permits trucks to make in many cases two hauls 
per day whereas a truck load of tobacco going to 
Norfolk usually requires a day and a half, so you 
can readily see that not only time and money are 
saved but that speed is a factor which also re- 
sults by using the Ocean Terminal at Morehead 
City. 

"These benefits are only a portion of the bene- 
fits that occur indirectly to many people in other 
industries, because of my use of the State Port. 
As an example, truck lines hauling our tobacco 
to the State Port increase their employment usage. 
When we speak of trucks we think of the truck 
drivers, the helpers, the warehousemen and others 
who are put to work because of that truck load 
of tobacco being loaded and unloaded. This 
cycle continues, for the more trucks that are used, 
the more fuel is used. This, in a way, affects the 
petroleum and gasoline industries, as well as re- 
sulting in additional tax revenue for the State of 
North Carolina." 

L. B. Jenkins Tobacco Company 
Leaf Tobacco Dealers 
Kinston, N. C. 



"We think the port is the biggest enterprise in 
our community. It employs stevedores while car- 
goes are being loaded and unloaded, therefore 
putting citizens from our vicinity on payroll. It 
is also the shortest route for Tug Boats on the 
coast." 

J. J. Ewell, Asst. Manager 
Freeman Brothers 
Morehead City, N. C. 



16 



NORTH CAPOLINA LIBRARY COMMISSION 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



ntatiiime Uomme'ice oettetiU (ill States 



(Reprinted from Wilmington Morning Star, Oct. 30, J 954) 



Wilmingtonians received an excellent lesson in the 
value of maritime commerce recently in a survey of 
the local expenditures of ships calling in the port here. 

But an even more emphatic demonstration of the 
wide range of benefits derived from the United States 
Merchant Marine is available in a financial report on 
a single large ocean liner. 

The liner recently completed her 100th crossing of 
the Atlantic and thus ended her first three and a half 
years in service. If you think that the operations of this 
large ship concern only waterfront businesses, con- 
sider a breakdown of some of the expenses. 

To date the officers and crew of the liner have re- 
ceived some SI 3,000,000 in wages. These men, who 
have permanent homes throughout the nation, have 
spent their wages in hundreds of American cities and 
towns. 



Stevedores earned SHOO, 000 and port charges ac- 
counted lor another $300,000. Insurance costs were 
$1,800,000 and maintenance and repair totaled Sl,- 
500,000. Fuel oil consumed by the mammoth floating 
power plant cost S3, 000,000 anil the passengers and 
crew ate 4,500,000 meals with the food bill running 
to $4,000,000. 

This makes the operation of the liner almost a na- 
tional program. The money was spent on countless 
items, both large and small, and it went to workers, 
farmers and businesses. 

The financial report on a large liner is merely an 
indication of the contribution made by the nation's 
merchant fleet. Every part of the nation benefits di- 
rectly or indirectly, and that is the reason why areas 
other than seaports should be concerned with the 
steady expansion of our Merchant Marine. 




New competitive punch for the U.S. merchant fleet 

The Maritime Administration feels that the fast, big Mariners can strengthen the competitive position of the U.S. merchant fleet 



17 



Horth Caiohna Mate Librei > 
Raleigh 





Y ^1 ^ I I ^ ,2!*' ""W "WB — 1 

1 j M' ,X- I I ^ J2T 55" "BB -* ~ 




PHILIP L. SULLIVAN, Terminal Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It 
is capable of berthing three 500-ft. vessels simul- 
taneously, with depth of 32 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 
square feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

OPEN STORAGE : Three acres of paved open stor- 
age, easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with cross- 
overs, full length of wharf apron; also depressed 
tracks at rear of transit sheds and warehouse, en- 
tire length. Storage yard on property for 240 
freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two Diesel switching lo- 
comotives. 

One 40-ton locomotive crane and two 25-ton lo- 
comotive cranes. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of 
various sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 
straddle trucks. 

Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at the transit 
sheds and warehouse; ramps for easy access into 
sheds and warehouse; portable side and end load- 
ing ramps for rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumi- 
gation plant with two chambers of 7,225 cubic 
feet each; equipped for HCN and methyl bromide. 

SERVICES : Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. 

Export crating service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Sea- 
board Air Line Railroad Companies and numerous 
highway motor transportation companies. 

Office space available for freight forwarders, 
steamship agents, etc. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 




ulo'iekeab Gitxi 

J. D. HOLT, Terminal Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It 
is capable of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships 
and one petroleum tanker, with a depth of 30 feet 
at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry with sprinklers. 

One transit shed, 32,000 square feet, constructed 
of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 

WAREHOUSES: Two storage warehouses, 88,000 
square feet each, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: Paved open storage, 60,000 
square feet, shipside and adjacent to transit sheds 
and warehouses. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. At- 
lantic and East Carolina Railway freight car stor- 
age yard adjacent to Port property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 
with detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, 
cotton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full pal- 
letization of cargoes. 
Tractors and trailers. 
Bagging equipment for hulk fertilizer. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING. Truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easy access into transit sheds and 
warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Proposed for later date. 

CHANNEL: Thirty-foot channel from dock to 
ocean; three and a half miles from terminal to sea 
buoy. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and I 'cderalh -ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. 

Served by Atlantic and East Carolina Railway Co. 
One interstate truck line on property, and served 
by numerous highway motor transportation com- 
panies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



19 



Kail Kates 



On Imported Bagging, Viz: Burlap, Gunny, or Jute 

Bagging or Burlap, Gunny or Jute Cloth, New 

or Old, Noibn, with or without paper lining. 

C. L. Min. Wt. 30,000 lbs. 

TO FROM 

Wilming- York 

ton New Baltimore Norfolk 

Chicago, III. 70 87 84 84 

Cincinnati, Ohio 70 76 73 73 

Indianapolis, Ind. 70 80 77 77 

Louisville, Ky 70 87 84 73 

Milwaukee, Wis. 76 87 84 84 

Minneapolis, Minn. 93 120 117 117 

St. Louis, Mo. 70 87 84 84 

All rates shown are subject to an increase of 1 5 % as 
authorized under Ex-Parte 175-B. 



On Imported Bags, Burlap, Gunny or Jute and 
Lined Burlap 
C. L. Min. Wt. 30,000 lbs. 

TO FROM 

Wilming- Norfolk 
ton Baltimore 

Burlington, la. 100 109 

Chicago, 111. 86 97 

Davenport, Iowa 100 108 

Dubuque, la 102 109 

Evansville, Ind. 86 99 

Indianapolis, Ind. 86 87 

Louisville, Ky. 86 91 

Milwaukee, Wis. 92 100 

Peoria, 111 86 101 

Rockford, 111. _' 97 101 

Springfield, 111. 86 101 

All rates shown are subject to an increase of 
authorized under Ex-Parte 175-B. 



Cotton- 



New 
York 
112 
100 
111 
112 
102 

90 

94 
103 
104 
104 
104 

15% as 




ATKINSON DREDGING 
CO. 

Home Office: Jacksonville, Fla. 
Field Office: R. F. D. 3. Box 234, Norfolk. Va. 



Channel Dredging * Fill Dredging 
Bulkheads * Wharf Construction 

D. D. ATKINSON, B. S. E.. President 

Member Society Naval Architects and Marine Engineers 

Associate Member American Society Mechanical 

Engineers 



CAPE FEAR 
TOWING COMPANY 

TUG SERVICE 
MARINE CONSTRUCTION 

Office Phone 2-3073 — Night 2-2762 

WILMINGTON. NORTH CAROLINA 



GREENHEART 

Piling. Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of 

Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and Bridges and 

Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK, N. Y. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE — WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 

GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and to 

abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, dolphins, 

rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State docks 
at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 



20 



Complete Banking Services . . . 

Serving .... 

Eastern North Carolina For 
Over Half A Century .... 

We offer you Import and Export Letters of 
Credit . . . 

Foreign Exchange, Draft or Cable . . . 

Travelers Cheques and Letters of Credit. 



Peoples Savings Bank & Trust Co. 

Established 1900 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



Member Federal Reserve System 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY. NORTH CAROLINA 

TELEPHONE 6-4652 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 



Peter B. Ruifin 

President 

W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 



William T. Davis 

Manager 



W. D. Williams 

Secretary 

J. P. Wilson 

Treasurer 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder Registration No. 376 



HEIDE AND CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



FORWARDING AGENTS 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 
STEVEDORES 

WILMINGTON 

v0 vo's * Gevc NORTH CAROLINA 

Cable Address 

"HEIDE" WILMINGTON-CAROLINA 

Telephone 3-5161 




Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 223 



READY TO SERVE . . . 

Your Port Of Wilmington Needs 

In every phase of the agricultural and 
industrial development of North Caro- 
lina, this bank has been an important 
factor. 

It has consistently cooperated with the 
grower, the manufacturer, the shipper 
and the merchant, helping to make 
North Carolina the prosperous, progres- 
sive State that it is. 

THE 

WILMINGTON SAVINGS AND 

TRUST COMPANY 

"NORTH CAROLINA'S PORT BANK" 

COMMERCIAL • TRUST • SAVINGS 

Established 1888 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Member Federal Reserve System 



POSTMASTER: If not delivered in 10 days, re- 
turn to Box 1619. State Ports Authority, 
Wilmington, N. C. Return Postage Guaranteed. 



Sec. 34.66. P. L. & R. 


U. S. Postage 


PAID 


Wilmington. N. C. 


Permit No. 225 



BOOT GMOEUft £D3RAHr COMMISSION 
RftOTGH, HjC* 



SHIP LAUNDRY 


One Day Service 

• 


IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 


CLEANERS, INC. 


FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE 6651 


WILMINGTON. N. C. j 


"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



STORAGE 



• • • 



HOUSEHOLD GOODS 
AND MERCHANDISE 



Warehouse Fire-Resistant 
Construction 

FARRAR TRANSFER & 
STORAGE WAREHOUSE 



DIAL 5317 
1121 S. FRONT ST. 



AGENTS FOR 
ALLIED VAN LINES. INC. 



GET INTO THIS PICTURE 
THROUGH OUR NORTH CAROLINA OFFICES 




COMPLETE BANKING SERVICES FOR EVERY PARTICULAR NEED 

FIRST CITIZENS BANK & TRUST COMPANY 

NORTH CAROLINA 



MEMBER OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



^ii 



NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY COMM'SSIOIf 
RALEIGH, 



3-<2 
BOfiLICATK 




-R 



n 



O oC " 



W*k 



North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 



FEBRUARY, 1955 



Au. 




■* 



a/ta. 



irn 



1f(o/iAkeacC <3Uy 






I 



HEIDE & CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 



YOYO'S *GE Ncy 



Cable Address 

"HEIDE" MOREHEADCITY-CAROLINA 

P. O. Box 322 

Telephone 6-3652 

R. L. HICKS, Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY. NORTH CAROLINA 




PETER B. RUFFIN, President W. P. EMERSON, Vice-President 

W. D. WILLIAMS, Secretary J. P. WILSON, Treasurer 

Wilmington Shipping Company 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 270 
Telephone 2-3381 



Cable Address 
WILSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



THE BANK OF 


WILMINGTON 


MEMBER 


FEDERAL DEPOSIT 


INSURANCE CORPORATION 


XP3l\ 




X>CTr<^ 




WILMINGTON 


NORTH CAROLINA 



PAVING CONTRACTORS 

Any Size Job Anywhere 

E. B. TOWLES 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

DIAL 2-0359 
Market Street Road 




S. 



*5f^^^*ES^ 




ASPHALT 
CONCRETE 

AND 
BITUMINOUS 

SURFACE 
TREATMENT 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 
George T. Adams, Editor 



February, 1955 



\ hi (_ \i j I, No 5 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

EDWIN PATE 

Chairman 

RAYMOND A. BRYAN 

V ice-Chairman 

W. AVERY THOMPSON 
Secretary-Treasurer 

J. HARRY WHITE 

Member 

HARVEY W. MOORE 
Member 

HAROLD F. COFFEY 

Member 

HENRY A. LINEBERGER 
Member 

Executive Director 
COL. RICHARD S. MARR 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

GEORGE T. ADAMS 

Asst. to Director 

E. E. LEE, JR. 

Traffic Manager 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

P. O. Box 1619— Telephone 3-1622 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN 

Terminal Manager 

MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

P. O. Box 14 5— Telephone 6-3159 

J. D. HOLT 

Terminal Manager 

WALTER H. FRIEDERICHS 
Assistant 

NEW YORK OFFICE 

39 Broadway, Wing 618 
New York 6, N. Y. 

WILLIAM S. CHILDRESS 
Commercial Agent 



SELL YOUK STATE PORTS 

This magazine is initialed to be read In at least ten people. Please pass it 
on when you are through. 



C^cnients 

Advancement 4 

Progress and Service ... 5 

"Dear Mr. Authority" 6 

More Ships, More Dollars 8 

Service and Savings 10 

Service Plus 1 1 

North Carolina's Gateways to the World 1 2 

New Facilities at Morehead City 14 

Bon Voyage for 195 5 - 15 

4-Part Harmony 16 

A Carolina Hardware Distributor 17 

Monthly Sailing Services from Europe 19 

Port Facilities, Wilmington 20 

Port Facilities. Morehead City 21 



COVER 

The sleek, modern passenger liner, VI. S. STOCKHOLM, shown on the 
cover was photographed as she arrived at Morehead City with tJic early 
morning sun breaking through for a beautiful day. She took on pass 
for a cruise to the Caribbean and Havana. 



CiaOancement . . . 



The many gains and increases in activities at the State Ports this past year point out that progress of an en- 
couraging nature has been taking place, and that the building up of the North Carolina deep-water ports at Wil- 
mington and Morehead City are actually coming into their own as important shipping centers of the South Atlantic 
region. 

There are many factors that this growth can be attributed to; one of the most important is public interest. 
This interest is taking advantage of the many benefits that the ports offer the entire state; because of this interest, 
shippers and industrialists in increasing numbers are investigating the possibility of using the ports, resulting in 
more and more cargoes coming into and going out of the Tar Heel State. 



This progressive growth is a sound one, for the ton- 
nages handled at the ports are made up of a variety 
of commodities used in North Carolina or produced 
here for export. 

At the Wilmington State Docks, during the last six 
months of 1954, 39 ships were worked and 81,000 
tons of cargo handled. Comparing this with the same 
period in 1953, an increase of over 100% was noted 
in the number of ships that were docked and a 300% 
increase in the tonnage handled. 

The Morehead City Terminal ended its year with 
banners flying high — the year closed with the Term- 
inal handling over 568,000 tons of commercial and 
military cargo. This is an increase of 75,000 tons over 
the calendar year of 1953. More than 235 ships dis- 
charged or loaded cargo in 1954 — resulting in an in- 
crease of 24 ships over 1953. 

Tar Heels from the coast to the mountains are learn- 
ing first-hand just how they can benefit from busy, effi- 
cient deep-water ports, and this is resulting in a grow- 



ing support for this state's financial program, and is 
being evidenced in North Carolina's port progress. 

The public, shippers of imports and exports, and 
industrialists of the Tar Heel State arc to be congratu- 
lated for the current results of the ports' growth in 
business, and they can, at the same time, be confident 
of increasing benefits for the future by continuing their 
support to the ports of North Carolina. 

The outlook for continued cargo growth and the nec- 
essary facilities to handle it is good, and through the ac- 
tive port development of the State Ports Authority, the 
ports of North Carolina intend to keep pace with the 
growth requirements of industry, agriculture and gen- 
eral business of North Carolina and other states in the 
south and mid-west. 

All the factors mentioned, coupled with a driving 
desire on the part of those serving the ports to render 
the best of service, presage a bright future for the 
ports of North Carolina, the young, but fast-growing, 
ports of the South Atlantic. 



Experts say that the fumigation plant at the Wilming- 
ton State Docks is the most modern and efficient on the 
East Coast. 




/' 




PROGRESS AND SERVICE die Kexj Wads 

ck tke Tlcitlt Ua't.oima 
£iate Pats Gutlto>iit\i 



Slightly over two years ago the State Ports of North 
Carolina, at Wilmington and Morehead City, were ded- 
icated to the service of developing a more expeditious 
handling of water-borne commerce from and to any 
part of the state of North Carolina, and other states 
and foreign countries. These ports, although very 
young in years, when compared with other shipping 
centers, are fast growing and are coming into their 
own as important shipping centers of the South At- 
lantic Coast. 

The encouraging progress that has been witnessed 
over the past year has been brought about by many fac- 
tors — the most important of these being service and 
public interest. The people of North Carolina are tak- 
ing advantage, not only of the services provided, but 
also of the numerous beneficial advantages that result 
to them whenever the ports are utilized. Many benefits 
have resulted to businessmen, importers and exporters 
and industrialists and the public through the use of the 
docks at Wilmington and Morehead City. Comments 
made by shippers point out that service through North 
Carolina State Ports, not only results in a saving of 
time in shipment, but also a reduction in costs for 
their customers and themselves. Statements to these 
effects comes from small as well as international in- 
dustries. 

This growth is sound, for the tonnage is made up 
of a great variety of commodities used in North Caro- 



lina or produced here for export. Much of the exports 
include tobacco, woodpulp, deer tongue, lumber, scrap 
steel, and other items, while the imports have been 
made up of mahogany, steel products, hardware, bi- 
cycles, burlap, rugs, glass, cotton, cocoa extract, peat 
moss, fertilizer, passengers, and many other articles of 
a general cargo nature. 

Throughout their young lives, the ports of North 
Carolina have continually stressed their basic policy, 
"Service." The Ports Authority is now proud to an- 
nounce that this policy is showing results in the steadv 
growth and progress of these state facilities, and with 
the continued assistance and cooperation that is now 
being demonstrated by importers, exporters, shipping 
companies, steamship lines, business men and citizens, 
the Authority is confident that this steady growth shall 
continue. 

During the last six months of 1954, remarkable 
gains were made in the number of ship arrivals and 
tonnages handled at the State Docks at Wilmington. 
Thirty-nine ships and some 81,000 tons of cargo were 
handled. In comparison with the same period of 1953, 
this shows an increase of over 100% in the number of 
ships docking, and approximately 300 % in the ton- 
nage handled. 

Another important factor in the continuing progress 
of the port is the two scheduled steamship services. 
These services will enable the small shipper to use the 
port in conjunction with many others. The benefits of 
these services have been well demonstrated by the num- 
ber of inquiries that have been made by shippers from 
all over the Tar Heel State. 

Many additions to facilities and equipment have 
been made and were put into service the past vear at 

(Continued on Page 18) 




PHOTO BY JERRY SCHUMAKER 



Looking east toward the State Port Terminal, Morehead City's 9-street wide and 38-strcet 
long peninsula can be seen stretching toward Beaufort. Bogue Sound can be seen on the 
right while the waters of Calico Creek, Newport River and Core Creek are on the left. The 
inland waterway fronts the south and east sides of the Port Terminal in the Background. 



Ueah. uUi. Ciutkoiitxj . . . 

By TED DAVIS, General Manager Morehead City Chamber of Commerce 



)) 



Requests for information from school children of all 
ages is not unusual in our office. We receive hundreds 
during each school year, but one received this year will 
never be forgotten. It was addressed: "Theport Au- 
thority, Chamber of Commercial, Morehead City, N. 
C." Scrawled on the reverse side was: "Dear Mr. Au- 
thority, I want some stuff about your town and 
ships . . ." 

Like every request for information about the port, 
beach, city or county, this one was answered the 
same day received. In reply we can send pictures, his- 
torical sketches and travel information. We can de- 
scribe the safety of beach and surf and the thrill of 
game fishing — but it would be difficult to completely 
tell the story of the Morehead City Terminal's immense 
value to this coastal area and the state as a whole. 



As Morehead's Mayor George Dill stated recently, 
"I have seen the change in this city since our port be- 
gan its rapid development. The added payroll of the fa- 
cility accounts for food, shelter and home repairs which 
could not be afforded by some before. Crews and pas- 
sengers of vessels tying up here pour thousands of dol- 
lars into mercantile tills. With the confidence and in- 
vestment our State government has placed in this de- 
velopment, possibilities for all our Carteret (County) 
citizens are unlimited." 

How are Chamber members affected? 

On December 26th, when more than 2,300 Tar- 
heels from all over the state visited the Brazilian tank- 
er Gaupore, Morehead restaurants had the best day 
this winter. Those food dollars turned over many times 
before leaving the county. 



When a Honduran tanker tied up December 27th, 
the crew practically "bought out" a variety store. Sea- 
men had to be helped to waiting taxis with bushel 
baskets of toys and candies. Nearly a hundred pounds 
of fancy roasted nuts were bought by a party of three. 
Every available tricycle in town was sold and taxis 
were kept busy shuttling from town to terminal. 

The M. S. Stockholm was delayed one day in sailing 
for Nassau and practically every motel, hotel and com- 
mercial rooming house was filled. Restaurants were 
packed with customers at breakfast next morning. 
With each cruise, returning voyagers ate in our restau- 
rants and bought souvenirs from our merchants. 

Food, some 53 tons of it, plus other supplies were 
purchased in North Carolina. Many of these dollars 
stayed in Morehead City. Laundries did over $2,000 
worth of business. Florists made up the largest orders 
for corsages ever received. Ladies' ready-to-wear stores 
had record sales on sailing days and again when the 
ship returned. 

Despite adequate parking facilities available at the 
port, local garages and service stations swelled their cof- 
fers servicing and storing travelers' autos. Exact figures 
cannot be secured, but estimates of the direct value of 
the Stockholm cruises in new money in the Morehead 
area go as high as $125,000. 



Spreading inland we hnd main items of export mov- 
ing through state ports. According to a report of the 
Venezuelan Chamber of Commerce, Venezuela, alone, 
imports textiles from Charlotte and Salisbury; paper 
products from Pisgah forest; grinding mill products 
from North Wilkesboro; herbs from Lenoir; cotton 
yarn, tire cord, and other cotton manufactures from 
Gastonia and Kannapolis. 

The lirst barge of grain left the loading facility oi this 
port for Baltimore Januarv 5th. Tobacco hogsheads 
continually move into the terminal for shipment to 
Europe and the Orient. Chemicals, petroleum and mil- 
itary shipments add their tonnages to the ever-mounting 
overseas commerce. 

Hardly a Navy payday passes that does not Find 
sailors spending wages in town. I verj member of this 
chamber has profited from the port. The complete 
story of the port value is hard to tell, but it can be 
seen in the faces of our citizens, it can be heard in the 
happy laughter of children with new toys, and it can 
be felt by the man buying security with money brought 
here by the terminals enterprise. 

This Chamber will have to go along with our little 
8-year-old school girl and say: "Dear--\ea, even-- 
Dear, Dear Mr. Authority, We want your stuff about 
our town and ships ..." 



A tanker enters the channel at Morehead City Port to unload chemicals. 



!'#»•-# 



• in' 



j*m 








1 1 


1 







WILMINGTON AT NIGHT 



PHOTO BY HUGH MORTON 



Tllole £lttys, Thole Dollate loi '55 

By P. M. CAMAK, General Manager Greater Wilmington Chamber of Commerce 



When the statistics are actually gathered concerning 
the overall economic life of Wilmington and New Han- 
over County for the year 1954, they are expected to be 
favorable in many respects, and particularly as to the 
increase in water-borne tonnage for the Wilmington 
harbor as compared to past years. Commerce and trans- 
portation will most certainly have played an important 
part in the expected total income of 89 million dollars 
or better for the citizenship of New Hanover County as 
a whole. 

Water-borne commerce and resulting land-borne 
commerce during the past year have shown definite 
signs of being the number one factor in leading the city 
and area to higher ground economically during the 
year 1955. Based upon improvement made in water 
commerce during 1954 over 1953, there is no neces- 
sity of expecting anything but improvement for the 
coming year. In 1953, South Carolina and Georgia led 
North Carolina in port tonnage. There was not too 
much difference in the figures, with South Carolina 
close to 6,000,000 tons; Georgia, 4,000,000 tons; and 
North Carolina, 3,758,598 tons. A look at the last six 
months of operations of the Wilmington harbor, and 
particularly the North Carolina State Port terminal, 
would indicate that recent efforts are beginning to 
bring results; and that had such ratio of tonnage pre- 



vailed during the entire year, North Carolina could ex- 
pect to approach Georgia's (Savannah) last record or 
beat it for the next 12 months. 

It is significant that the November record of the 
State Port terminal at Wilmington showed that it ex- 
ceeded its former tonnage record for any one month, 
specifically April, 1953, in that it handled 30,000 tons 
in November as compared to the previous high of 
April, 1953, of 27,000 tons. The nature of the car- 
goes indicated wider interest in commodity shipments. 
The cargoes making up the November record were 
burlap, jute, hardware, steel products, tobacco, cotton, 
plate glass, cocoa, and other items of general cargo type. 

In looking at the Wilmington harbor from the 
standpoint of the Chamber of Commerce, one of the 
most important aspects needing attention is one of 
simple cooperation in many ways, and particularly to- 
ward getting an additional 2-foot depth in order to per- 
mit the solicitation of larger vessels in making Wilming- 
ton a port of call. Some $500,000 was originally in 
the Rivers and Harbors Bill of the Federal Government 
for its current fiscal year, but such item was eliminated 
upon passage of the bill. It has been estimated that it 
would take $2,000,000 to dredge two additional feet 
for the Wilmington harbor, thereby making it 34 feet. 
Should all interested agencies coordinate their efforts 




PHOTO BY HUGH MORTON 



Aerial view of Wilmington, showing drawbridge spanning Cape Fear River on U. S. 
Highways 17, 74 and 76. In the left foreground are some docks and warehouses where 
vessels from Europe, South America, Africa, and other forcigti ports call at Wilmington. At 
extreme right is the U. S. Custom House. 



in this connection and succeed in getting this item in 
the next bill, it could prove to be a decided factor to- 
ward increasing tonnage for Wilmington. 

The payrolls expended in loading and unloading 
ships are exceedingly valuable to the area. Some types 
of ships have been known to call for a labor payroll 
of approximately $40,000 in the handling of cargo. 

Such operations are looked upon as not only com- 
mercial but industrial, as more ships bring in more 
commodities, naturally enhancing the industrial pic- 
ture. 1955 should see greater interest taken in the 
State Ports by the citizenship and the leaders from 
this area. Likewise, such interest should be taken in the 



Wilmington harbor as a whole; and only cooperation 
and understanding on the part of all concerned are 
needed to bring about a much bigger and more profit- 
able transportation picture for the vear 195 5. 

The answer for a larger port for the betterment of 
North Carolina as a whole lies in the field of coordina- 
tion ol diversit) oi interests of the governmental, in 
dustrial, and agricultural leaders of the State of North 
Carolina. It is necessary for the average citizen ol the 
State to know thai the future increase in water-borne 
commerce will be to an economic advantage to not 
onl) the manufacturer and processor, but to the con- 
sumer. 



SERVICE 
SAVINGS 

to we 

Ttlajci @nc)u$faies 

4 

Tioitlt (salolina 

By S. L. MARBURY 

In the year of 1912 the Wertheimer Bag Company 
began business at Birmingham, Alabama, and has 
continued the operation of this plant for the past forty 
three years. 

In the year of 1935, due to extensive business in 
the states of North and South Carolina, it was deem- 
ed advisable to open an additional plant somewhere in 
the Carolinas, and, after a thorough examination of 
the advantages to be offered for the successful opera- 
tion of this plant, the city of Wilmington, N. C, was 
decided upon. 

Much thought was given to the matter of labor sup- 
ply, climatic conditions and, above all, to the advant- 
ages of a location at a port city where it would be pos- 
sible to bring in shipments of burlap direct from Cal- 
cutta, India. 

The Wilmington plant began business in June of 
1935, the chief operation being the manufacturing of 
Burlap and Cotton Bags of all kinds, which are used 
extensively in the Southeast for sacking such products 
as Fertilizer, Minerals, Cottonseed products, Potatoes, 
Dairy Feed, Peanuts and many other commodities. 

In addition to the manufacture of bags, considerable 
volume comes from the sale of Burlap in piece good 
form to the textile industry and furniture manufac- 




Unloading of burlap from India at Wilming- 
ton State Ports, for Wertheimer Bag Company. 



turers, as well as the manufacture of Burlap Tubing, 
this product being used by textile manufacturers for 
the protective covering for shipments of various fabrics. 

During the nineteen years of operation in Wilming- 
ton, the Port of Wilmington has been a very important 
factor in the life of this business. The greater portion of 
all burlap produced comes from India and Pakistan, 
and with direct ocean shipments from India to Wil- 
mington, a considerable saving in freight is passed 
along to users in the Carolinas. 

In early 1954 negotiations were made with the Isth- 
mian Steamship Line pertaining to their vessels stop- 
ping at the Port of Wilmington, and this resulted in 
their decision to make Wilmington a regular monthly 
port of call for a period of several months, and if suffic- 
ient volume continues, it will, in all probability, be 
made a permanent monthly port of call. 

Much can be gained for the Port of Wilmington if 
users in North Carolina of Burlap and Burlap Bags 
purchase as much of their requirements as possible 
through those importing through the Port of Wilming- 
ton. 



10 



g 



elOice Hlus 



A 



By W. S. R. BEANE 



I Icicle & Co., Inc., have been acting as Steamship 
Agents, Stevedores, Freight Forwarders, and Custom 
Brokers at the Port of Wilmington since 1874. They 
have been handling vessels at Morchcad City since 
1937 and opened an office there, under the manage- 
ment of Mr. II. L. Hicks, during September of 1954. 
The most activity Morehead City waterfront has ever 
seen was the Swedish American liner STOCKHOLM 
calling on four voyages this fall to embark and debark 
over 1,500 passengers from 32 states of the United 
States including North Carolina. The Swedish Ameri- 
can line was very complimentary on the fast and effic- 
ient turnaround given the STOCKHOLM, and have 
announced plans for five additional voyages next fall 
which will make Morchcad City the leading Cruise 
port of the South Atlantic. 

Many of the passengers were very complimentary of 
the fine food and foreign atmosphere they enjoyed 
while traveling on a Swedish vessel. Most of the pas- 
sengers were from various North Carolina points and 
enjoyed low cost transportation driving their own auto- 
mobiles from their front door to alongside the STOCK- 
HOLM, where arrangements were made to store the 
cars while they were away on the Cruise. With foreign 
Cruise vessels serving Morehead City it is now becom- 
ing very much less expensive for the people of North 
Carolina to enjoy the foreign atmosphere of a vessel 
and pleasures of a foreign land without the added ex- 
pense of going to and from North Atlantic Ports. 

Heide & Co., Inc., has handled many and various 
commodities over the State Port Terminals at Wilming- 
ton and Morchcad City. General Cargo of all types, to- 
gether with special chartered vessels with full cargoes 
of Calcium Ammonium Nitrate and Raw and Refined 
sugar have been discharged. With the fast growing de- 
velopments it is expected they will represent many 



lines in the near future that will he operating regular 
sailings to many ports of the world, which will give the 
North Carolina shippers and receivers the same serv- 
ice they are now getting at more distant ports, plus 
a substantial saving in domestic freight to and from 
the Port of \\ ilmington or Morehead City. 

Heide Warehouse Co. specializes in handling bulk 
cargoes at the Port of Wilmington. They operate three 
piers with berths for three ocean going vessels, and 
have a capacity for storing 55,000 tons of mat tl. 
Over these docks move the majoritj of chemicals im- 
ported from all over the world that go into making 
plant food. Some of the principal items imported art- 
Nitrate of Soda from Chile, Nitrolimc from Holland, 
Potash Salts from Germany, France and Spain, Am- 
monium Sulphate Nitrate from Germany, Ammonium 
Nitrate from Houston, Sulphur from Galveston and 
Leather Meal from Belgium. Most of the commodities 
imported are shipped to the 14 Plant Food Factories 
located at Wilmington, where thev are mixed into the 
world's finest fertilizers for North Carolina farmers. 

These modern clocks are all equipped with the latest 
up-to-date belt conveyors for efficient low cost handl- 
ing. They can receive cargo as fast as any vessel can de- 
liver and frequently one pier alone will receive over 
300 tons of material per hour. During the fertilizer 
season many days you will find as many as 3 5,000 one- 
hundred pound bags have been filled from bulk and 
shipped to the various plants. Taking bulk and bags 
together, about 50 to 60 freight cars per day are load- 
ed and shipped. 

Through these efficient terminals farmers can place 
orders for their nitrogen requirements in the morning 
and it will be delivered to their railroad siding by 8:00 
a.m. the next morning. More distant points require an 
additional dav. 



SS Kir st en Tona, represented by Heide &■ Co., calling at the Wilming- 
ton State Ports to pick up wood pulp, for delivery to Argentina, S. A. 



CAROLINA'S G 




US BANANAS 

% 





ffl 





MONKIES 
COTTON 

COCOA 
GLASS 
JUTE 
BURLAP 



Y HARDWARE 

u 




FERTILIZER 



IMPORTS 



(ED 




CARPETS— RUGS ^+±~' PEAT MOSS 

STEEL PRODUCTS ^O^U FISH MEAL 
^^ SALMON 



LUMBER 



! PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



GENERAL CARGOES 



SUGAR 



L 



EWA YS TO THE 




1 EXPORTS 






® WOOD PULP 


r-« 1 




o o 


VEHICLES 


¥~^ TOBACCO 





CHEESE 


4$P^ STEEL 


s 


DRIED MILK 


( V^p DEER TONGUE 


h 


FERTILIZER 


Y^J COTTON SEED MEAL 


B 


GENERAL C 



The newly constructed ex- 
port and domestic grain 
leading facility at the More- 
head City State Terminal. 
Another service to the agri- 
cultural industry of North 
Carolina. 




PHOTO BY RAY CONNER 



NEW FACILITIES at lUo^Wd Cfy 



PHOTO BY RAY CONNER 







The recently completed 
L.S.T. Ramps at Morehead 
City. This facility provides a 
service to the military dur- 
ing peace times as well as 
during times of conflict. 
About one hundred L.S.T.'s 
use the Morehead Terminals 
each year. 



l/Ciiace 

fa 

'955 



M.S. Stockholm at 
dock at the Morehead 
City Port Terminal, 
flying the Swedish 
flag. 







^1 O C K H Oi 

* tt T E BOtf 



PHOTO BY RAY CONNER 



PROPOSED CRUISES, 1955— M. S. STOCKHOLM— FROM MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



Port 

NEW YORK 
MOREHEAD CITY 



Dist. Speed 
468 17 



Arrive 



Hours 
To Dock 



Depart 
THURS. OCT. 27 — 11:00 P.M. 



SAT. OCT. 29 — 6:30 A.M. 

1 D. 71/2 HRS. 



MOREHEAD CITY 

ST. GEORGE (BERMUDA) 
MOREHEAD CITY 


671 

671 

1342 


18 
18 


MON. OCT. 31 — 7:30 A.M. 
THURS. NOV. 3 — 6:30 A.M. 

4 D. 151/2 HRS. 


1 

1 


SAT. OCT 29 - 
TUES. NOV. 1 


-3:00 P.M. 
— 4:00 P.M. 


MOREHEAD CITY 

ST. GEORGE (BERMUDA) 

MOREHEAD CITY 


671 

671 

1342 


18 
18 


SUN. NOV. 6 — 7:30 A.M. 
WED. NOV. 9 — 6:30 A.M. 

4 D. 15V2 HRS. 


1 
1 


FRI. NOV. 4 — 
MON. NOV. 7 - 


3:00 P.M. 
-4:00 P.M. 


MOREHEAD CITY 

ST. GEORGE (BERMUDA) 

MOREHEAD CITY 


671 

671 

1342 


18 
18 


SAT. NOV. 12 — 7:30 A.M. 
TUES. NOV. 15 — 6:30 A.M. 

4 D. 151/2 HRS. 


1 
1 


THURS. NOV. 
SUN. NOV. 13 


10 — 3:00 P.M. 
— 4:00 P.M. 


MOREHEAD CITY 

ST. GEORGE (BERMUDA) 

MOREHEAD CITY 


671 

671 

1342 


18 
18 


FRI. NOV. 18 — 7:30 A.M. 
MON. NOV. 21 —6:30 A.M. 

4 D. 15V2 HRS. 


1 
1 


WED. NOV. 16 
SAT. NOV. 19 - 


— 3:00 P.M. 
- 4:00 P.M. 


MOREHEAD CITY 
PORT-AU-PRINCE 

CARTAGENA 
SAN BLAS 
CRISTOBAL 
KINGSTON 
MOREHEAD CITY 


1040 

639 

201 

80 

560 

1135 

3655 


18 

18 

18 

18 

17.5 

18 


FRI. NOV. 25 — 7:00 A.M. 
SUN. NOV. 27 — 1:00 P.M. 
MON. NOV. 28 — 7:30 A.M. 
MON. NOV. 28 — 5:00 P.M. 
THUR. DEC. 1—7:00 A.M. 
SUN. DEC. 4 — 11:00 A.M. 

tl DAYS 18 HRS. 


2 
2 
1 

1 
2 
2 


TUE. NOW 21 
FRI. NOV. 25 - 
SUN. NOV. 2 7 
MON. NOV. 28 
TUE. NOV. 29 
THUR. DEC. 1 


— 5:00 P.M. 

— 11:00 P.M. 

— 5:00 P.M. 
— 11:00 A.M. 

— 6:00 P.M. 
—5:00 P.M. 



MOREHEAD CITY 
NEW YORK 



SUN. DEC. 4— 12:00 NOON 



468 



18 MON. DEC. 5 — 5 P.M. or* 2 

11.5 TUE. DEC. 6 — 8:00 A.M. 2 

1 DAY 5 HOURS OR 2 DAYS 20 HRS 



'Depending on how much out-going cargo there Will be on hoard. 



15 



i \t presstime possible changes were 
announced in tltc above schedule) 



WHEN 
YOU WANT 




HARMONY 




; 



MARKETS 

Fast freight facilities can 
service 67% of your domestic 
market within 72 hours. Of the 
more than 1,000 Motor Trans- 
port Operators, 48 are Class 
One. Six Airlines serve 1 5 air- 
ports. 89 Buslines and 6 prin- 
cipal railroads afford interstate 
shipments. There are shipping 
points on the Inland Waterway, 
plus 2 DEEPWATER PORTS, 
WILMINGTON AND MORE- 
HEAD CITY, for export and 
import of finished products or 
raw materials. 



; 



LABOR 




The Modem Carolina Power & 
Light Building at Wilmington 

L>a\ou\xa$ Piomctec) 

IN "4-PART HARMONY" 

Promoters of industrial development are waxing musical, if not 
lyrical, in praise of the Carolinas. 

"Four Part Harmony" is the title of Carolina Power 8c Light 
Company's latest brochure issued to promote new industry. The 
four harmonious parts, it says, are labor, location, materials and 
markets. 

The brochure is being mailed to hundreds of industrial pros- 
pects across the nation, to chamber of commerce executives and 
other development agencies, according to S. Paul Vecker, CP&L's 
vice-president in charge of area development. 

CP&L carries its musical theme to the natural conclusion that: 
"Nothing could be finer than a site in Carolina." 



; 



j 



There is a versatile manpow- 
er pool of skilled and unskilled 
workers in the Carolinas. The 
people here are home and farm 
owners in small communities, 
and from the nearby country- 
side. They possess a high degree 
of native intelligence and dex- 
terity, and are easily trained. 
They are a happy people — they 
think for themselves — the kind 
that make highly productive 
employees. 



MATERIALS 



Ample reserves for most in- 
dustries account for the steady 
expansion of manufacturing 
and processing in the Carolinas. 
This area holds national top 
ranking in the manufacture of 
Synthetic Fibers, Tobacco and 
Textile products. It ranks high 
nationally as a producer of 
Wood Pulp, Lumber, Paper, 
Brick, Tile and Clay Products. 
Minerals and Timberland are 
in plentiful reserve. 



LOCATION 

The mountains, central or 
coastal plain areas offer a wide 
variety of industrial sites, as 
well as variety of climate. In 
recent years, Burlington Mills, 
DuPont, J. P. Stevens & Co., 
Westinghousc, Cornell - Dubi- 
lier, General Electric, Gorham 
Mfg. Co., Reeves Bros., Bab- 
cock & Wilcox, Saco-Lowell 
Shops, International Resistance 
Co., have located in our service 
area. Each required a specific 
solution to its location prob- 
lem and found the right site in 
the Carolinas. 



16 



G Carolina Ha'ibSSJe^B^iitub.'i 



Is changing the Entire Character of its Half ( entury Business through Associa- 
tion with the North Carolina Ports Authority. 



Use of North Carolina ports has opened the door to 
a world-wide selection of fine goods, states Lawrence 
i). Nuchols, president of the American Hardware & 
Equipment Company. 

The opportunity to select the finest quality hardware 
goods from manufacturers throughout the world is 
completely changing the character of business of the 
company, said Mr. Nuchols. 

The American Hardware & Equipment Company, 
founded in 1913, is the largest 100% wholesale hard- 
ware distributor in the Carolinas, serving thousands of 
independent retail dealers in North and South Carolina. 
The home office of the company is located in Charlotte, 
distribution center of the Carolinas. 

Mr. Nuchols said that his company now imports for- 
eign goods exclusively through North Carolina ports. 
The elimination of overland shipping costs from other 
eastern ports such as New York and Norfolk has re- 
sulted in savings of time and thousands of dollars. The 
savings have made possible an immensely expanded im- 
port business for the firm. 

The American Hardware & Equipment Company is 
now importing wire, nails, fencing and other hard- 
ware products for the use of Carolina people. Mr. 
Nuchols said that thousands of customers are now 
getting a better grade of wire products for less money. 

Mr. L. R. Clemmer, vice president of the firm, who 
operates out of the Charlotte headquarters, supervised 
the unloading of the shipment in the Wilmington port. 

In August the S. S. Southstar arrived in Wilmington 
with a large shipment of fencing and nails for the 
American Hardware & Equipment Company. Mr. 
Nuchols went to Europe last spring to set up the pur- 
chases. After weeks of screening West German manu- 
facturers and checking their products, Nuchols signed 
contracts with four firms. Manufacture of the fencing 
began immediately and the fruits of the contracts ar- 
rived on the Southstar. 

One of the most interesting products imported by 
American Hardware & Equipment Company, said Mr. 
Clemmer, is the Torpedo bicycle. The bicycle is a Euro- 
pean lightweight with a three-speed Sturmey Archer 
gear shift and front and rear caliper brakes. The bi- 
cycle is distributed exclusively by American Hardware 
& Equipment Company dealers in the Carolinas. 

Mr. Nuchols and Mr. Clemmer plan to leave the 
first of February for another trip to Europe to select 
goods for importing through North Carolina ports. Ad- 
ditional shipments of wire, fencing and nails are plan- 
ned for the next few months, and Mr. Nuchols said 
that they intend to explore tools, household supplies 
and appliances for future importing. There is no end 
to the high quality hardware goods available in Euro- 
pean markets, he said. 



The importing of hardware goods from I urope will 
result in a wider selection of goods for Carolina con- 
sumers, said the AHEC executives. People will be 
able to select their products from the finest made in 
both America and I mope. 

Mr. Nuchols feels that in importing foreign goods 
through North Carolina ports his company is serving 
the growth of the state. Ever) time a \ ictory ship comes 
into the Wilmington or Morehead City ports, North 
Carolina becomes $50,000 richer, according to port 
authorities. 

Shipments through North Carolina ports also mean 
employment for pilots, stevedores, warehousemen, tug 
crews, truckers and railroads, said Mr. Nuchols. 

AHEC executives also feel that increased imports 
from countries such as West Germany will mean better 
business for our friends across the seas and help them 
to build stable economies, so important to peace and 
freedom. 

The AHEC executives have praised the fine new port 
facilities which are well equipped to take care of pro- 
jected shipments of hardware goods from foreign ports. 

Mr. Nuchols said that his firm will do all in its pow- 
er to stimulate development of North Carolina harbors 
by means of bringing shipments direct to them from 
overseas. There is no reason, he said, why business 
men of our state cannot work together to see that their 
imports come to our own ports of Wilmington and 
Morehead City. Ele said that there are scores of indus- 
tries who are interested and with the cooperation of all, 
North Carolina can become as famous a marine ship- 
ping state as it is an overland shipping state. 

A new era in the business of the American Hard- 
ware & Equipment Company has begun. Ahead, the 
far-sighted executives of the firm see increased import- 
ing of foreign goods, wider selection for Carolina con- 
sumers, and a continually growing ami expanding 
business for the firm. 



/!. I . Clemmer, Vice-President of American llardv 
Equipment Co. inspecting his shipment in the modern steel 
ami concrete transit shed at the Wilmington v 




A 



loc;>iess an 



>CA 



*S 



&h.OkC(Z (Continued from Page 5) 



Wilmington. The New $115,000 fumigating plant 
was granted Federal approval, and shortly following 
demonstrated its efficient and up-to-date operation in 
fumigating the eargoes of the first Egyptian cotton that 
was ever to be handled through North Carolina ports. 

New tractors and trailers to handle the cotton ship- 
ments in an expedient and labor-saving manner were 
also added, as well as heavy duty lift trucks, straddle 
trucks and fork lifts for the handling of lumber, to- 
bacco and heavy items of a general cargo nature. The 
cranes at Wilmington were recently outfitted with 
complete electro-magnetic equipment for efficient use 
in the handling of metals. 

The State Port Terminal at Morehead City closed 
the old year with many records and opened the new 
year with numerous shipping "firsts." 

More than 568,000 tons of commercial and mili- 
tary cargo were handled during 1954, and of this total 
400,000 tons were commercial commodities. 

"This total represents an increase of 75,000 tons 
over the calendar year of 1953," said Colonel Richard 
S. Marr, Executive Director of the State Ports Author- 
ity, "During the year of 1954," Marr said, "235 ships 
discharged or loaded, while during the year before, 211 
ships were handled. This is a gain of 24 ships or an 
increase of an additional ship every two weeks during 
1954. 

The commodities making up this record tonnage fig- 
ure were the exports of tobacco, the imports of sugar, 
the unloading of jet fuel, kerosene, gasoline, fuel oil, 
asphalt, bunker C oil and glycol. 

The Port of Morehead City is taking rapid strides 
towards becoming one of the nation's leading tobacco 
ports. For the first time, tobacco has moved to Ham- 
burg, Germany, Le Harve and Bordeaux, France, in ad- 
dition to other continental ports from the Morehead 
City Terminal. The facilities are being used by more 
than 14 of the leading tobacco exporters of North 
Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. 

The year of 1954 not only was a banner year for 
the terminals in record tonnage and ship movements, 
but was also marked with many "first" happenings and 
events. 

For the first time in its history the terminal had 
ocean passenger service to the Caribbean, more than 
sixteen hundred people from North Carolina and 32 
other states sailed on four cruises, which were inaugu- 
rated last October. The success of the sailings is indi- 
cated by the fact that the State Ports Authority takes 
pleasure in announcing four more cruises to Bermuda 
this fall, and a two-week "Thanksgiving Cruise" to 
South America, making stops at Port au Prince, Carta- 
gena, San Bias, Cristobal and Kingston. 

Another first for the terminals was the completion 
of the construction of three loading ramps for use by 
Navy EST type vessels. The port provides a service to 
the military in peacetime as well as during times of con- 
flict. About 100 LST's use the port facilities each year 



and the new ramps make possible the handling of three 
ships simultaneously. 

A first that is of great interest to the agricultural in- 
dustry of the Tar Heel and other bordering states is 
the construction of the first export and coastwise grain 
loading facility, which went into operation on January 
4th, to move the first barge load of grain from More- 
head City to a northern port. 

This facility makes it possible for North Carolina 
farmers to ship their grains and seeds to all parts of 
the world with a saving of time and costs. 

As the old year closed on record ship movements 
and tonnages, the new year opened with activities that 
indicate more record breakers for the near future. 

On the first day of the new year, the newly built 
Japanese motor ship TAMON MARU, arrived at More- 
head City to transport the first cargo of North Carolina 
tobacco from Morehead City to Japan. 

At the same time, the TAMON MARU, of the Nip- 
pon Yusen Kaisha Line, was loading, another ship, the 
SS HOCHST of the North German Lloyd Lines, was 
also loading tobacco for Hamburg, Germany. This was 
the first time that two ships ever loaded tobacco at the 
same time at the terminal and the first time that those 
lines ever came to Morehead City. 

The Port of Morehead City set other records during 
the first fifteen days of the new year. Plans called for 
the handling of 3 ships for tobacco export, 3 tankers, 
20 Naval vessels, and the first loading of a barge of 
grains for shipment to a northern port via the inland 
waterway. Also, early this year — for the first time — 
an ocean going tanker will make Morehead City a port 
of call to load fish oil, produced by the tremendous 
menhaden fishing industry of the Tar Heel State for 
export to Germany. 

In the past, this fish product was moved to New 
York for transhipment; now another North Carolina in- 
dustry can be served at its own front door. 

Based on the past year's performance of activities, 
progress should continue into 1955, and we fully ex- 
pect our State Terminal at Morehead City to be of even 
greater value to the people and the State this new year. 

Meanwhile, the Authority has under consideration 
for the near future, the building of approximately 800,- 
000 square feet of additional storage and transit floor 
space and, for the purpose of handling heavy cargo 
shipments, the acquiring of gantry cranes. 

In line with the endeavor to provide improved and 
additional facilities, great effort is being made to estab- 
lish more attractive rates and lower costs to shippers. 

Continued increase in the use of the facilities of the 
North Carolina State Ports Authority reflects a healthy 
and steady growth, and the outlook for continued cargo 
growth is good. The Ports Authority's active develop- 
ment program aims to develop more world trade for 
North Carolina by providing improved facilities and 
services, the keys to the trade expansion that is taking 
place at the North Carolina Ports. 



Hlontnlxj (yadincj ^yewices hem GWtobe 



By PETER B. RUFFIN 

Regular monthly sailing services westbound from 
Europe to Wilmington without minimum cargo guar- 
antees were inaugurated last month when the S/S 
RADNOR called here. Peter B. Ruffin, President of 
the Wilmington Shipping Company, agent and steve- 
dore for the South Atlantic Steamship Line, Inc., of 
Savannah, Ga., said the new service came as a result of 
greatly increased volume and variety of shipments made 
by South Atlantic vessels to the Port City during the 
last year. 

Wilmington is the first port of discharge. The ves- 
sels will then proceed to Charleston, South Carolina, 
Savannah, Georgia, and Jacksonville, Florida. 

"This is the most encouraging development that has 
come to Wilmington in many years," he said. 

The monthly sailings will be between Antwerp, Bel- 
gium and Wilmington, with calls at other continental 
ports, chiefly Hamburg and Bremen, Germany, and 
Rotterdam, The Netherlands, and also frequent calls 
at United Kingdom ports. 

The vessels will discharge their cargoes at the State 
Ports Docks. Some of the vessels will occasionally have 
bulk cargoes, such as fertilizer, for discharge at Heide 
Warehouse Company. The principal cargoes moving 
through Wilmington from Europe aboard South Atlan- 
tic ships are steel products, hardware, burlap, fertilizer, 
cocoa extract and bicycles. 

These import items are almost entirely for North 
Carolina receivers and are distributed throughout the 
state. 

"With this regular service," Ruffin said, "more ship- 
pers can be expected to add other commodities." 



He described the new service as encouraging to both 
small and large shippers as well as to the port itself, be- 
cause there is no minimum cargo guarantee. 

Richard S. Marr, Director of the State Ports Author- 
ity, expressed his pleasure in the new service, saying, 
"This service shows the progress that is being made in 
the use of the State Port facilities. It also demonstrates 
that there are many people in North Carolina who 
realize the value of shipping through the State Ports. 

During the past year, Ruffin said, South Atlantic 
freighters have called frequently at Wilmington, but 
only when a specific quantity justified a call. Because 
of the increased tonnage coining here, however, South 
Atlantic has agreed to make Wilmington a regular port 
of call once a month. 

Ruffin also said that his firm is verj encouraged by 
South Atlantic's action, "which indicates their confi- 
dence in Wilmington and the future of the port." 

Regarding east-bound service from Wilmington to 
Europe, Ruffin explained that South Atlantic will 
make frequent calls, as cargo offers. Outbound car.;') 
is principally made up of woodpulp, tobacco and 
forest products. It is hoped that in the near future 
the establishment of east-bound schedules to Europe 
may be announced. 

The first vessel of the west-bound scheduled services 
arrived at the State Docks January 15th, with a general 
cargo from Europe. 

South Atlantic owns and operates four C-2 vessels, 
which were built in Wilmington bv the North Carolina 
Shipbuilding Company. Additionally, they charter 
numerous vessels in the open market to take care of 
their requirements. 



S. S. Sonthstar of the 
South Atlantic Steamship 
Lines unloading cargoes at 
the Wilmington State Ports, 
during one of the scheduled 
runs established by the lines. 





IVilmiHcton 






PHILIP L. SULLIVAN, Terminal Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It 
is capable of berthing three 500-ft. vessels simul- 
taneously, with depth of 3 2 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 
square feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

OPEN STORAGE : Three acres of paved open stor- 
age, easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with cross- 
overs, full length of wharf apron; also depressed 
tracks at rear of transit sheds and warehouse, en- 
tire length. Storage yard on property for 240 
freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two Diesel switching lo- 
comotives. 

One 40-ton locomotive crane and two 25-ton lo- 
comotive cranes. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of 
various sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 
straddle trucks. 

Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at the transit 
sheds and warehouse; ramps for easy access into 
sheds and warehouse; portable side and end load- 
ing ramps for rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumi- 
gation plant with two chambers of 7,225 cubic 
feet each; equipped for HCN and methyl bromide. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. 

Export crating service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Sea- 
board Air Line Railroad Companies and numerous 
highway motor transportation companies. 

Office space available for freight forwarders, 
steamship agents, etc. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



20 




nloh.ekaab Gitu 

J. D. HOLT, Terminal Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 2,550 feet long with a 3 4 -foot apron. It is cap- 
able of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one 
Petroleum tanker, with a depth of 30 feet at mean 
low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry with sprinklers. 

One transit shed 32,000 square feet, constructed 
of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 

WAREHOUSES: Two storage warehouses, 88,000 
square feet each, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: Paved open storage, 60,000 
square feet, shipsidc and adjacent to transit sheds 
and warehouses. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. At- 
lantic and East Carolina Railway freight car stor- 
age yard adjacent to Port property. 

EXPORT: Grain Loading Facility. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cot- 
ton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletiza- 
tion of cargoes. 

Tractors and trailers. 

Bagging equipment for bulk fertilizer. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easy access into transit sheds and 
warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Proposed for later date. 

CHANNEL: Thirty-foot channel from dock to ocean; 
three and a half miles from terminal to sea buoy. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity ami I ; cdcrall\ -ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipsidc. 

Served by Atlantic and East Carolina Railway Co. 
One interstate truck line on property, and served 
by numerous highway motor transportation com 
panics. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 

THREE Ncwh Constructed I .S.'l . Ramps. 



21 



You 

See 

This 

Space 

Many 

Others 

Do 




AMERICAN HARDWARE 
& EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALERS 
HARDWARE, AGRICULTURAL 
IMPLEMENTS AND BUILDING 
SUPPLIES • SERVING THE 
CAROLINAS SINCE 1913 • 



Charlotte, N. C. • Wilmington, N. C. • Greenville, S. C. 
Home Office: Charlotte, N. C. 



It 

Can Help 

You 

Sell 

Your 

Services 

or 
Products 



Isthmian Steamship Company 

71 Broadway New York 6, N. Y. 

India, Pakistan, Ceylon 
Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq 
Thailand, Burma 
Hawaiian Islands 

Malaya, Philippines, Hong Kong 
Indonesia, Indo-China, Viet Nam 
Alexandria, Lebanon, Red Sea 
North Atlantic & Gulf Intercoastal 

Wilmington Agents 
C. D. Maffitt Company Tel. Wilmington 6824 



PROVISIONS, DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 

International Paint 

Socony- Vacuum Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone 4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



CAPE FEAR 
TOWING COMPANY 

TUG SERVICE 
MARINE CONSTRUCTION 

Office Phone 2-3073 — Night 2-2762 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of 

Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and Bridges and 

Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara). Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK. N. Y. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE — WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 

GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and to 

abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring; bulkheads, dolphins, 

rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State docks 
at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 



22 



Complete Banking Services . 

Serving .... 

Eastern North Carolina For 
Over Half A Century .... 

We offer you Import and Export Letters of 
Credit . . . 

Foreign Exchange, Draft or Cable . . . 

Travelers Cheques and Letters of Credit. 



Peoples Savings Bank & Trust Co. 

Established 1900 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



Member Federal Reserve System 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

TELEPHONE 6-4652 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 



Peter B. Ruffin 

President 

W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 



William T. Davies 

Manager 



W. D. Williams 

Secretary 

J. P. Wilson 

Tr usurer 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder Registration No. 376 



HEIDE AND CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



FORWARDING AGENTS 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 
STEVEDORES 



v0 yd-s AG<^ 



WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Cable Address 

"HEIDE" WILMINGTON-CAROLINA 

Telephone 3-5161 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 223 




READY TO SERVE . . . 

Your Port Of Wilmington Needs 

In every phase of the agricultural and 
industrial development of North Caro- 
lina, this bank has been an important 
factor. 

It has consistently cooperated with the 
grower, the manufacturer, the shipper 
and the merchant, helping to make 
North Carolina the prosperous, progres- 
sive State that it is. 

THE 

WILMINGTON SAVINGS AND 

TRUST COMPANY 

"NORTH CAROLINA'S PORT BANK" 

COMMERCIAL • TRUST • SAVINGS 

Established 1888 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Ccr; 
Member Federal Reserve System 



23 



POSTMASTER: If not delivered in 10 days, re- 
turn to Box 1619. State Ports Authority, 
Wilmington, N. C. Return Postage Guaranteed. 



Sec. 34.66. P. L & R. 

U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Wilmington. N. C. 

Permit No. 225 



NORTH CAROLINA LIBRARY C0MMESSI01 
RALEIGH, N.C. 



SHIP LAUNDRY 


One Day Service 

• 


IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 


CLEANERS, INC. 


FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE 6651 


WILMINGTON. N. C. 


"Serving Ships Since 1919" 




STONE 

TOWING 

LINE 



MARINE RAILWAY 

4 SOUTH WATER STREET TELEPHONE 4547 

WILMINGTON. NORTH CAROLINA 




The Stamp of Approval 
is on 

MCLEAN SERVICE! 



TERMINALS IN 11 STATES 
EQUIPPED TO SERVE YOU 



^ 



M-LEAN 



%>** 




v 



General Offices • Winston-Salem, N. C. 
"WE PULL FOR INDUSTRY" 



CONNECTICUT 


Durham 


Bridgeport 


Fayetteville 


Norwich 


Greensboro 


GEORGIA 

Atlanta 
Augusta 


Hickory 
Kinston 
Rocky Mount 
Salisbury 


MARYLAND 


Shelby 


Baltimore 


Winston-Salem 


MASSACHUSETTS 


PENNSYLVANIA 


Boston 


Philadelphia 


Springfield 




Worcester 


RHODE ISLAND 


NEW JERSEY 


Providence 


Hawthorne 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


Jersey City 


Anderson 


New Brunswick 


Charleston 


NEW YORK 


Columbia 


Albany 


Greenville 


Brooklyn 


Hartsville 


New York City 


Spartanburg 


NORTH CAROLINA 


VIRGINIA 


Asheville 


Danville 


Burlington 


Lynchburg 


Charlotte 


Richmond 




MAY, 1955 



7?/ 
pffc 



NorthlCarolina Stale Library 



* —Vfc 



0o c 

«■■ MM «■• « 




'^^^^^■i — , — in. i — ^rr — u» y. pw jictm^» ^"- - 




Specialized Handling 



I 
I 



1ffo/tekeacC <3tfy 



I 



I 
i 



HEIDE & CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
c LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 



pVO'S *GE Ncy 



Cable Address 

"HEIDE" MOREHEADCITY-CAROLINA 

P. O. Box 322 

Telephone 6-3652 

R. L. HICKS, Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY. NORTH CAROLINA 




PETER B. RUFFIN, President W. P. EMERSON, Vice-President 

W. D. WILLIAMS, Secretary J. P. WILSON, Treasurer 

Wilmington Shipping Company 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 270 
Telephone 2-3381 



Cable Address 
WfLSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT 

INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



PAVING CONTRACTORS 

Any Size Job Anywhere 

E. B. TOWLES 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

DIAL 2-0359 
Market Street Road 



mm 

ASPHALT 
CONCRETE 

AND 
BITUMINOUS 

SURFACE 
TREATMENT 





MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

EDWIN PATE 
Chairman 

RAYMOND A. BRYAN 

V ice-Chairman 

W. AVERY THOMPSON 
Secretary-Treasurer 

J. HARRY WHITE 
Member 

HARVEY W. MOORE 
Member 

HAROLD F. COFFEY 

Member 

HENRY A. LINEBERGER 

Member 

Executive Director 
COL. RICHARD S. MARR 



TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT 

STEPHEN S. KOSZEWSKI 

E. E. LEE, JR. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

P. O. Box 1619— Telephone 3-1622 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN 

Terminal Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
P. O. Box 145— Telephone 6-3159 

J. D. HOLT 

Terminal Manager 

WALTER H. FRIEDERICHS 

Assistant 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 



May, 1955 



Volume I, No. 6 



SELL YOUR STATE PORTS 

This magazine is intended to be read by at least ten people. Please pass it 
on when you are through. 



(contents 



Specialized Handling and Service - 4 

N. C. S. P. A...... 5 

Strong But, Oh! So Gentle 6, 7 

Sunny Point Terminal — - 8, 9 

Morehead City State Terminals 10 

Cleanliness Reflects Careful Handling 1 1 

Specialized Handling 12, 13 

Efficient Unloading 14, 15 

Careful Handling Adds to Value 16 

Careful Handling Means Good Monkey Business 17 

Port Facilities, Wilmington 20 

Port Facilities, Morehead City. 21 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

39 Broadway, Wing 618 

New York 6, N. Y. 

WILLIAM S. CHILDRESS 
New York Representative 



COVER 

Personalized and specialized attention in handling cargos. is an every day 
service at the North Carolina State Docks. The same care is given to a 
cargo of monkeys that arrived from India aboard the S. S. Steel Traveler. 

PHOTO BY W W SHAW 



specialized 

HANDLING AND SERVICE 

Throughout the nation, ports boast about their facilities, their services, and their potentials, for handling 
cargoes for any industry. 

North Carolina State Docks also boast in the same manner, but unlike so many others, the Docks of North 
Carolina are also boasted about by shippers, importers, exporters, ship captains, freight handlers and many others. 
They boast about the modern steel and concrete docks and wharves, and the clean condition of all the facilities, 
which include the new transit sheds, warehouses, and fumigation plant. 



They also boast about the services, which usually 
result in a saving to them and eventually to their 
customers. 

But most of all they all boast about the handling 
that their cargoes receive at the North Carolina State 
Docks — specialized handling that always means a 
great deal, dollar-wise, to the shipper because of the 
minimum damage to commodities that are being im- 
ported or exported. As a shipper of imported fertilizer 
said as he viewed his thousands of tons of cargo being 
unloaded at one of the State Docks, "Specialized handl- 
ing is just one of the many outstanding services pro- 
vided at the State Docks, and because of this care in 
handling and the efficiency of moving my bagged 
fertilizer, my company saves money which we eventual- 
ly pass on to users of our product, the farmers. This 
saving is a result of the little or no damage to our prod- 



uct, and the good condition in which the farmer re- 
ceives his shipments." 

"Your methods of handling and storing tobacco are 
the best yet that I've seen anywhere," said a represen- 
tative of one of the South's leading tobacco companies. 

A ship captain who had sailed the seven seas for 
many years recently sailed his ship into one of North 
Carolina's ports, and after docking remarked, "It was 
apparent even from a distance, as we approached your 
dock, that you people certainly give care in handling 
your cargoes. This was reflected by the cleanliness of 
your entire wharf. It is one of the cleanest docks that I 
have seen in this world." 

The North Carolina State Ports Authority is proud 
to have others boast about them, because it is their 
policy to give the same care to all cargoes being handl- 
ed, as the care the shipper would give; and because 

(Continued on Page 18) 



Modern Scale House at Wilmington State Docks, for weighing trucks and rail freight cars 




N - ot Some but Git 
C — Gfiaoei Keceioe 
S — pecializea 
P — e/isonal 
A — Mention 
at the 

N. C. S. P. A. 



"Cargo tonnages through the North Carolina State 
Docks at Wilmington for the month of March exceeded 
the amount handled during the first six months of 
1954," said Colonel Richard S. Marr, Executive Di- 
rector of the State Ports Authority. 

For the second time in one week recently the State 
Docks at Wilmington enjoyed capacity business. The 
modern wharf was filled with three ships, one loading 
North Carolina products, such as pine logs for Holland, 
woodpulp for England, Germany, and Belgium. An- 
other ship was unloading a full cargo of Cal-Nitro. 
This fertilizer from West Germany arrived here for 
distribution to the agricultural industry of North and 
South Carolina and other bordering states. Down the 
wharf was a third ship loading scrap metals for ex- 



port to Europe, much of which returns as agricultural 
hardware for use in the state. 

Colonel Marr also said, "Since, over a year this is 
the first time that three commercial ships have been 
worked at the 1,500-foot wharf, and it is gratifying 
to have two such events happen in one week. From all 
sources of information, gathered from various industries 
now bringing cargoes through the docks, and from oth- 
ers who contemplate shipping through North Carolina 
ports, we can look forward to many more such busy 
shipping days at our North Carolina State Docks." 

"Agricultural hardware imports into North Carolina 
and bordering states are also on the increase through 
the State Docks at Wilmington," said Marr. The rea- 
sons for these additional tonnages of hardware com- 
modities for the farmers of the Tar Heel State, Ten- 
nessee, Kentucky and Virginia are the economy result- 
ing from scheduled sailing from Europe, the shorter 
hauling distances within areas of the ports for distrib- 
utors, and the savings that come with deep water trans- 
portation. These factors all added together mean that 
the Tar Heel farmer and his neighbors in other states 
are benefiting by having their shipments from overseas 
come through the ports of North Carolina. 

The president of the American Hardware & Equip- 
ment Company, of Charlotte, stated, "That the savings 
that result to his company by importing his agricultural 
hardware through the State Ports eventually are passed 
on to his customers, the farmers of this state and other 
states." 

A representative of the Steel Products Supply Com- 
pany, of Wilmington, reported that their increased 
sales of imported hardware is at present being shipped 
via truck and rail to points in North Carolina, Tennes- 
see, Kentucky and Virginia, and that because of the 
many advantages in shipping through North Carolina 
ports, these cargoes are expected to increase even 
more. 

Most of the imported hardware that goes to the ag- 
ricultural industry is made up of the following items: 
wire fencing, barbed wire, nails, hinges, fence posts, 
and other farm hardware needs. 

Colonel Marr added that agricultural hardware from 
Europe is destined for the farmers of the Carolinas, 

(Continued on Page 18) 




m 



•■ 



.' 



STRONG 




Recently, one of America's leading public individuals said, "As shipping business competition grows keener 
for world markets and the margins of profit are narrowed, it is often the ability to deliver 'in good order' that is the 
criteria for placement of contracts for goods and materials." 

The other day a representative of the Cummins Diesel Sales Corporation, Mr. John Faunce, Manager of the 
High Point, North Carolina office, visited the State Docks and in a discussion with several officials of the State 
Ports Authority, he said, "Your Diesel-powered freight engines are a symbol, not only of careful handling, but per- 
fect shipping. The ease of handling cars in your yards by Diesel engines does decrease many factors that cause 
damage to goods carried. The shock that usually is made upon coupling and uncoupling cars from the engine or 



CARE IN HANDLING I! 






. . . but, Ok! so Gentle 





each other is reduced to such a minimum by the gentleness and ease with which Diesels move in starting and 
stopping. 

"Here at the North Carolina State Docks," he added, "you not only handle with care, but because of this 
care you eventually handle freight faster, easier, and safer. This ultimately means not only a saving in time, but 
money as well, and most of all it results in satisfied customers." 

As Mr. Faunce departed the docks, he remarked, "Remember that your Diesels are very strong, but also very 
gentle, and we are proud to serve your docks where cargoes arc given specialized handling and service." 



A MUST AT N.C.S.P.A. 



rtW*' 






• **<iVti % 






. • 5 «- 



s I 




' 









Sunny Point — Air view of Wharf No. 1 looking north. Land point in mid-back- 
ground inspired Sunny Point, name of old plantation which existed there years ago. 



PHOTO BY ART NEWTON 



SUNNY POINT TERMINAL 



rr 



£aled €oei Suilt 



The Sunny Point Army Ammunition Loading Term- 
inal, currently nearing completion on the lower Cape 
Fear River, represents maximum engineering tech- 
niques in design for efficient cargo movements and 
safety of operations. 

Colonel William A. McAleer of the Army Trans- 
portation Corps, a career officer with some 1 5 years of 
service who assumed command April 1, views the 
three-wharf terminal as "the safest ever built" concern- 
ing the conservation of manpower and protection of 
property. 

Years of Transportation Corps and Corps of Engi- 
neers experience and "know huw" have gone into the 
planning and building of Sunny Point Terminal. 

While the type of handling equipment and the 
methods to be applied are in the planning stage at this 
time, Colonel McAleer foresees generous use of the 
ever reliable lift truck coordinating with normal ship 
gear in shifting ammunition from rail and truck car- 
riers to ships' holds. There are indications that some 
new ideas will be added to time tested practices when 



ft 



operations get underway later this year. What these 
innovations will be is a matter yet to be determined. 
The Pennsylvania-born CO, however, has some very 
definite convictions about how bombs and shells should 
be handled to assure safe arrival at destinations as well 
as to protect handling personnel. He would, after years 
of similar responsibilities in the States and overseas in 
World War II and the Korean War. 

Designed and under construction by the Wilmington 
District, Corps of Engineers, the fire protection system 
for wharves offers push-button service in emergencies. 
Skirting both the waterside and landside of each wharf 
is an 8-inch water main insulated with molded fibre- 
glass covered with an aluminum jacket. This covering, 
plus water kept warm in winter by thermostat control- 
led electric coils in tank atop the service building and 
circulated round-the-clock by pumps, assures a temp- 
erature of not lower than 40 degrees at all times. Such 
an arrangement eliminates the possibility of freezing. 

When in standby, mains are filled with domestic 
fresh water but switch to river water automatically in 



' 



an emergency. In the event of a power failure, auxiliary 
diesel motors take over automatically without loss of 
pressure. Hose houses are located at intervals along 
the landside of wharves with push-button switches to 
provide instant water flow when the need arises. The 
system incorporates automatic valves which prevent the 
forcing of river water into the domestic system, reser- 
voirs of which are located a mile or better inland from 
wharves. 

In view of the corrosive nature of the atmosphere 
and unusually long spans, designing engineers chose 
aluminum wire with a steel core for the electric power 
distribution system. Copper is more vulnerable to cor- 
rosion than aluminum and, too, the supply of copper 
was critical during the design period. The most redeem- 
ing feature of the system, however, concerns voltage. 
In lieu of planning a system using conventional 12,- 
4 70 volts, designers chose 23,000 bolts. This plan as- 
sures ample power to wharves, the most distant points 
of consumption from the sub-station and is more econ- 
omical in cost. 

Regular "street" lights on the landside of each wharf 
are dwarfed by four 84-foot towers on the waterside 
with 12 1,500 watt flood lights on top of each tower 
providing light for 24-hour operations when necessary. 

Another of the more significant features of the 
Sunny Point Terminal concerns railroad trackage on 
wharves. The single line ingress-egress route spreads 
to three lines on wharf decks. Between the outer line 
and shipside is a platform built on the level with boxcar 
floors. Thus cargo material may be picked up by ship's 



gear immediately outside car doors, an arrangement re- 
quiring minimum Ufttruck work. 

Ships may navigate the area unimpeded and without 
coming in close contact with other vessels taking on 
cargoes at Sunny Point. Three channels 34 feet Beep 
and 300 feet wide branch off from the main 32-foot 
river channel and broaden to 800 feet wide opposite 
wharves to provide turning basins. 

Located on the west side of the river and approxi- 
mately 10 miles from deep water in the ocean beyond 
Fort Caswell, the terminal site affords ideal shelter 
from hurricanes which usuallv spring from the south- 
west and heavy blows winging down from the north- 
east to vent their power on the old Fort Fisher penin- 
sula. Immediately west of the site spreads a virgin 
forest to minimize threats of high winds from that di- 
rection. Perhaps it should be noteel that the Cape Fear 
River and the Sunny Point facilities for mooring offer 
a convenient escape from storms and haven of refuge 
for ships in distress. But this is not new. Many a mar- 
iner has sought out the spacious Lower Cape Fear 
River when beset by storms at sea. 

With ample water in depth and breadth for naviga- 
tion, with wharves constructed for a specific purpose 
and with available land and air carriers, Colonel \le- 
Aleer feels that the Army's Transportation Corps is in 
an excellent position to fulfill the principles of logis- 
tics so far as the safe and efficient movement of explo- 
sives and ammunition is concerned — what you need, 
when you need it, where you need it, and in the quan- 
tities needed. 



Timber for Sunny Point being unloaded at North Carolina State Ports, Wilmington 







=30 



The A. C. Monk and 
Company main plant at 
Farmville, N. C. 




PHOTO BY AERO-PIX 



Uloielteaa C<fu ^tatelebvninals naOe What Qt lanes 
FOR CAREFUL HANDLING OF TOBACCO 



"I can highly recommend the careful handling and 
storage of tobacco at the Morehead City State Term- 
inals," said A. C. Monk, Jr., President and Treasurer 
of the A. C. Monk and Company, Inc., of Farmville, 
North Carolina. 

Mr. Monk has been in the tobacco business all his 
life and has kept pace with the growth of the market 
through the years. The A. C. Monk Company, which 
has its modern main plant at Farmville, is well equip- 
ped and is capable of a daily capacity of 375,000 lbs., 
and has a 30,000-hogshead storage area. This firm also 
has branches and storage facilities in other areas. 



This company has developed into one of the best 
known and largest leaf tobacco exporting businesses in 
the United States. 

The State Ports Authority has been more than proud 
to serve the A. C. Monk Tobacco Company and other 
companies who have been exporting tobacco through 
the State Terminals at Morehead City. 

The Terminals at Morehead City are in close prox- 
imity to many North Carolina tobacco redrying areas, 
and represent a short haul for trucks loaded with to- 
bacco destined for the export trade, which usually 
means a savings to shippers. This is in addition to the 

(Continued on Page 18) 



PHOTO BY JERRY SCHUMAKER 




UleanlineAs KetUcts (^aiekul nandlm 



5 



Captain Mathias Dahle, master of the motorship 
Concordia Sun, said, upon his arrival for the first time 
at a North Carolina port to load a cargo for Europe, 
"As we approached your docks, I was very impressed 
with the cleanliness of your wharves and other facilities. 
This appearance reflects the manner in which you must 
handle cargoes, and this was verified after I observed 
the care with which your workers moved my cargo from 
transit shed to and aboard my vessel. 

"I have sailed the seven seas and have entered ports 
all over the world, and I must say that the handling of 
cargoes at the North Carolina State Docks is among the 
best I have witnessed throughout the sailing world." 





*&* 




Yes — even the ocean going steamers get careful attention 
at the State Docks. Shortly after a recent storm at sea. 
the steamer Radnor sailed into the Cape I ear River to 
discharge a cargo at the State Docks. While she was be- 
ing unloaded her crew were busy chipping and painting 
away the scars that resulted from buffeting she received 
from the storm. One of the crcic members said "It was 
the worst storm I've ever sailed in." 







\\^ \<*° ^' 





Even scrap steel receives 
careful handling. 9 




Careful handling of cargoes from 
ship to rail freight cars. 1 1 



SPECIALIZE 




. r\ean «° nS ! sto red 
-Su9 ot L :cVoHo^- 



Vfitb ^e 





lo QdeH ; f nil 'ze r k ■ 



tfo *««!&** 



5JJS&- 





HANDLING 



ollicient i(moaamc — 
LAean ana (salelul ^toiaGe 

SAVES TIME 
and MONEY 




Recently, during one of the busy shipping days at 
the Wilmington State Docks, when three ships were 
being loaded and unloaded at the same time, a gentle- 
man who gave the appearance that he knew a great 
deal about shipping was observed to be very interested 
in the unloading of one ship. This vessel had shortly 
before arrived from Germany with a cargo of fertili/er 
labelled Cal-Nitro and destined for the farm lands of 
the Carolinas and other bordering states. 

It was learned a few minutes later that the gentle- 
man who was so intently watching the unloading of 
the bagged fertilizer was indeed someone well qualified 
in the business of shipping and the handling of car- 
goes. He was Thomas VV. Davies, representative of the 
Synthetic Nitrogen Products Corporation of New York, 
the company that brought the fertilizer through the 
State Docks. 

Although Davies represents a New York firm he lives 
in this area of the Carolinas and knows the agricultural 
industries of the South as well as he knows shipping. 

Shortly after his keen inspection of the methods of 
unloading his cargo of Cal-Nitro from aboard ship, he 
proceeded to follow the movement of his product from 
shipside into the modern transit shed, which is just a 
few feet from the ship. Here, in the well-lighted and 
very clean temporary storage facilities, Davies watched 
as his cargo was handled and stored in preparation for 
shipment by rail and trucks. While the ship was unload- 



ing his cargo on one side of the transit shed, freight cars 
were being loaded with his product on the other side. 

It was learned later from Mr. Davies that more than 
thirty railroad cars were loaded that afternoon with his 
product for shipment to dealers throughout the Caro- 
linas for distribution to the agricultural industry. 

"What I have seen here at the State Docks is not 
only extra careful handling of my cargo, but also ef- 
ficient and expedient movement in the preparation of 
my product for transportation inland," remarked Dav- 
ies, and he added, "Because of care in handling and the 
efficient way you people move our product, my com- 
pany saves time in distribution, as well as realizing a 
savings in money that is eventually passed on to the 
farmer. Not only that," he said, "but the farmer receives 
our product in good condition, without the loss or dam- 
age which usually results from careless handling. That's 
important to my firm and me because the farmer is our 
best customer, and he appreciates good service as well 
as receiving his goods in the best condition possible." 
Davies went on to say "Specialized handling is just one 
of the many outstanding services provided by the State 
Docks of North Carolina, and because of these services, 
increasingly more shippers like myself are selecting 
the State Docks for import business into the Carolinas." 
He also said, "I expect to have more cargoes follow this 
first one of the season, through the North Carolina 
State Docks." 



*-<* 




W. C. Gardner, of the Jas. I. Miller Tobacco Company, is 
shown explaining methods of tobacco sampling to Al. C. 
Smith, assistant warehouse superintendent for the North 
Carolina State Docks at Wilmington. 



Csatelul nandlina 
Gxibs to the Value 



■i %b 



acco 



• • • 



Preparing hogsheads of tobacco for inspection is a 
highly technical undertaking and to do this properly, 
the State Port's Operation Manager called upon the 
services of the Jas. I. Miller Tobacco Company of Wil- 
son, North Carolina. 

This company sent one of their top experts, W. C. 
Gardner, who spent about three days at the Wilmington 
State Docks teaching the warehousing personnel the 
techniques of properly unpacking and repacking to- 
bacco for inspection purposes. 

During the time Gardner was at the State Docks, he 
spent most of his time with the warehousing staff in 
the modern storage plant, which is constructed of 
steel, concrete and masonry and is completely equipped 
with sprinkler and deluge water systems, which make 
it as safe as possible against any fire hazard. 

Upon his completion of instruction, Gardner pointed 
out to the staff many factors for which they should be 
quite proud. He said, "In all my years as a tobacco man, 
I have seen many storage plants and many methods of 
handling tobacco in all its stages, and I must say that 
I consider your storage facilities here among the best I 
have seen anywhere. The methods you employ in your 
handling of the thousands of hogsheads of tobacco you 
have stored here would make any tobacco man proud 
to know that you give the same attention and care to 
his tobacco as he would." 

He also added, "Not only is the handling among the 
finest I have witnessed in my experiences as a tobacco 
man, but the clean conditions you maintain in your 
warehouse add to the value of the tobacco and keep the 
infestation rate down to the lowest possible minimum." 



Redrying plant and storage facilities of the Jas. I. Miller 
Tobacco Company, Inc., of Wilson, North Carolina. 




Gaieml ftandliHG 

Ttieans Good 
ulonheii Business 



Jack J. O'Keefe, a representative of Eli Lilly and 
Company, one of the leading pharmaceutical firms in 
this country, spent a day at one of the State Docks 
awaiting a ship from India with a cargo of monkeys 
for his company. 

This firm in the past shipped all their Simians from 
India by air, and this was the first shipment by sea, 
through the North Carolina ports. The cargo was con- 
signed to one of their plants in Indiana. 

Economy and handling of their live cargo were the 
important factors in having this company consign their 
shipments through these docks. 

Shortly after the monkeys were unloaded from the 
ship and placed aboard trucks for their trip to the 
Hoosier state, O'Keefe remarked, "The specialized han- 
dling and care given to this cargo of animals, added to 
the economy of deep water transportation, is good 
monkey business for our firm. It also means that we 
expect to make all our future shipments to Indiana 
through your ports." 

About two weeks later, another cargo of monkeys 
arrived — and as O'Keefe said, we at the State Ports re- 
peat — "Careful and specialized handling is good 
monkey business." And we add, "It is also good business 
for the State Ports and all others who ship through the 
ports of North Carolina." 




/. J. O'Keefe, of the Eli Lilly Company (center), is shown 
discussing the values of careful handling with Henry' Tref- 
flich, President of Trefflich's Bird and Animal Company, 
of New York. Trefflich, who is one of the nation's hading 
importers and exporters of mammals, birds and reptiles, 
agrees with O'Keefe that their cargo handling at the North 
Carolina Ports is given the care they would give it. 




Il 



_ 




/. J. O'Keefe and Hcnn 
Trefflich arc shown await- 
ing the docking of the S. S. 
Steel Traveler at the Wil- 
mington State Docks. 



SPECIALIZED HANDLING . . . 

(Continued from Page 4) 

careful handling, such as is given at the State Docks 
is one of the important factors why more shippers are 
using North Carolina Ports. 

The success of a port's growth requires more than 
deep water, or long wharves and equipment. The first 
requirement is doing business the right way. The steady 
and progressive growth of the N. C. State Ports is re- 
sulting from doing business the right way, and this 
attitude is carried out not only by the Authority heads 
but is displayed by the "ever willingness" to do just a 
little more, an attitude that is observed among the for- 
warders, brokers, steamship agents, Customs officials, 
dock workers, stevedores and the personnel of the Au- 
thority. 

It is this manner of business that is making the ports 
of North Carolina known throughout the sailing trade, 
as the "PORTS OF SPECIALIZED HANDLING AND 
PERSONAL SERVICE." 



IN* >*• 9* ■ • f^» • • • 

(Continued from Page 5) 

peat moss for the beautiful gardens within this area, 
rayon fibres from Europe for the textile mills, carpets 
for the rug dealers of North Carolina, powdered cocoa 
for wholesalers, and rubber boots that may eventually 
be worn by fishermen along the coast and mountain 
streams of our state, are a part of the cargoes that ar- 
rived at the State Docks over the past few days. 

Woodpulp manufactured locally was being loaded 
for shipment to the United Kingdom, scrap metals 
were being loaded by electro-magnetic equipment 
aboard another ship for parts of Europe. Being unload- 
ed from a ship that had just arrived from India and 
Egypt was burlap for use in the bagging and furniture 
industries. Also being unloaded from the same vessel 
was a cargo of monkeys, consigned to one of the coun- 



try's largest pharmaceutical firms for laboratory re- 
search. 

The State Terminal at Morehead City also was the 
scene of increasing activities. Many new records were 
set with the increased numbers of military ships using 
the docks during the last few weeks. Tobacco for ship- 
ment to European countries is arriving daily at the 
terminal, fertilizer for the agricultural industries of the 
Carolinas and bordering states is being bagged and ship- 
ped inland by rail and truck carriers. 

A cargo of fish oil for Germany was shipped directly, 
for the first time, out of North Carolina through the 
terminals at Morehead City. Petroleum and asphalt 
products tonnages have been continuously increasing 
with a possibility of setting a new 1955 record for the 
Morehead City State Terminals. 

Marr said that all these increases in tonnages and 
the diversified cargoes coming in for use in this area 
of the United States, indicates that importers and ex- 
porters are realizing the economy of shipping through 
the North Carolina State Ports, and also that their car- 
goes are handled with the care they themselves would 
give it. 

MOREHEAD . . . 

(Continued from Page 10) 

fact that tobacco handled at the State Ports is given the 
same care that tobacco men themselves give. 

Handling of tobacco at Morehead City is done on a 
mechanized basis with heavy lift trucks, used for rapid 
transfer from trucks and freight cars, for stacking that 
has been considered the finest by many tobacco men 
who ship through the State Terminals at Morehead 
City. 

The State Ports Authority, whose policy is service, 
is pleased to hear from one of the nation's leading to- 
bacco men that the handling and storage of tobacco at 
the Morehead City State Terminal is considered among 
the best. 



Philip L. Sullivan, operations manager of the State Docks at Wilmington is shown explaining to Betances Gallardo, represen- 
tative of the Puerto Rican Transportation Authority, how savings result for North Carolina farmers by having agricultural 
hardware moved through North Carolina State Ports. Gallardo arrived here after spending a year with the New York Ports 
Authority. His visit in Wilmington was for the purpose of acquiring information concerning the latest methods of port or- 
ganization and operation. Gallardo, who was here for three weeks, will use the information he received for use in the $19- 
million port expansion program at San Juan. He declared he was very favorably impressed with the modern facilities and 
handling operations of the State Ports Authority. 





Another first for the State Docks, three ships are loading and 
unloading while a fourth is anchored awaiting her turn. 



Still another first for TSJorth Carolina ports — pine logs 
from the Tar Heel State are being shipped for the first 
time through the State Docks at Wilmington, for deliver) 
to Holland. Also being loaded aboard the S. S. HENRY 
L/LAIAN is wood pulp manufactured in the state, for 
shipment to England, Germany, and Belgium. 




Members of the Wilmington Brigade Boys Club give care- 
ful handling to mahogany lumber which was present- 
ed to them by Col. Richard S. Marr, on behalf of E. N. 
Beard of Greensboro, one of the nations leading hardwood 
dealers, who made a gift of the lumber to the boys for use 
in their wood craft classes. 



Commanding General of the New York Port of 1 mbarha- 
tion visits the State Docks at Wilmington. General Limes 

Glorc is shown talking to Colonel Richard S. Marr, Di- 
rector of the Ports Authority (center). Accompanying the 
General were Colonel Raymond I . Hill (right). District En- 
gineer, Wilmington District. Corps of Engineers, and Col- 
onel R. C. Harrcs of the New York Embarkation office. 



19 




IVilmincton 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN, Terminal Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It 
is capable of berthing three 500-ft. vessels simul- 
taneously, with depth of 32 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 
square feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

OPEN STORAGE : Three acres of paved open stor- 
age, easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with cross- 
overs, full length of wharf apron; also depressed 
tracks at rear of transit sheds and warehouse, en- 
tire length. Storage yard on property for 240 
freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two Diesel switching lo- 
comotives. 

One 40-ton locomotive crane and two 25-ton lo- 
comotive cranes. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of 
various sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 
straddle trucks. 

Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at the transit 
sheds and warehouse; ramps for easy access into 
sheds and warehouse; portable side and end load- 
ing ramps for rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumi- 
gation plant with two chambers of 7,225 cubic 
feet each; equipped for HCN and methyl bromide. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. 

Export crating service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Sea- 
board Air Line Railroad Companies and numerous 
highway motor transportation companies. 

Office space available for freight forwarders, 
steamship agents, etc. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



20 




I 







ulolekead Ccfy 

J. D. HOLT, Terminal Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is cap- 
able of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one 
Petroleum tanker, with a depth of 30 feet at mean 
low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry with sprinklers. 

One transit shed 32,000 square feet, constructed 
of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 

WAREHOUSES: Two storage warehouses, 88,000 
square feet each, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: Paved open storage, 60,000 
square feet, shipside and adjacent to transit sheds 
and warehouses. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. At- 
lantic and East Carolina Railway freight car stor- 
age yard adjacent to Port property. 

EXPORT: Grain Loading Facility. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 

detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cot- 
ton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletiza- 
tion of cargoes. 

Tractors and trailers. 

Bagging equipment for bulk fertilizer. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easy access into transit sheds and 
warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Proposed for later date. 

CHANNEL: Thirty-foot channel from dock to ocean; 
three and a half miles from terminal to sea buoy. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally-ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. 

Served by Atlantic and Fast Carolina Railway Co. 
One interstate truck line on property, and served 
by numerous highway motor transportation com- 
panies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 

THREE Newly Constructed L.S.T. Ramps. 



21 



You 

See 

This 

Space 

Many 

Others 

Do 




AMERICAN HARDWARE 
& EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALERS 
HARDWARE, AGRICULTURAL 
IMPLEMENTS AND BUILDING 
SUPPLIES • SERVING THE 
CAROLINAS SINCE 1913 • 



Charlotte, N. C. • Wilmington, N. C. • Greenville, S. C. 
Home Office: Charlotte, N. C. 



It 

Can Help 

You 

Sell 

Your 

Services 

or 
Products 



Isthmian Steamship Company 

71 Broadway New York 6, N. Y. 

India, Pakistan, Ceylon 
Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq 
Thailand, Burma 
Hawaiian Islands 

Malaya, Philippines, Hong Kong 
Indonesia, Indo-China, Viet Nam 
Alexandria, Lebanon, Red Sea 
North Atlantic & Gulf Intercoastal 

Wilmington Agents 
C. D. Mdffitt Company Tel. Wilmington 6824 



PROVISIONS, DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 



O. E. DuRANT 



SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 

International Paint 

Socony- Vacuum Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone 4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



CAPE FEAR 


TOWING 


COMPANY 


TUG 


SERVICE 


MARINE CONSTRUCTION 


Office Phone 2-3073 — Night 2-2762 


WILMINGTON, 


NORTH CAROLINA 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of 

Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and Bridges and 

Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK, N. Y. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE — WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 

GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and to 

abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, dolphins, 

rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State docks 
at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 



22 



Complete Banking Services . 

Serving .... 

Eastern North Carolina For 
Over Half A Century .... 

We offer you Import and Export Letters of 
Credit . . . 

Foreign Exchange, Draft or Cable . . . 

Travelers Cheques and Letters of Credit. 



Peoples Savings Bank & Trust Co. 

Established 1900 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



Member Federal Reserve System 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

TELEPHONE 6-4652 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 



Peter B. Ruffin 

President 

W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 



William T. Davies 

Manager 



W. D. Williams 

Secretary 

J. P. Wilson 

Treasurer 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder Registration No. 376 



HEIDE AND CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



FORWARDING AGENTS 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 
STEVEDORES 

WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Cable Address 

"HEIDE" WILMINGTON-CAROLINA 

Telephone 3-5161 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 223 




READY TO SERVE . . . 

Your Port Of Wilmington Needs 

In every phase of the agricultural and 
industrial development of North Caro- 
lina, this bank has been an important 
factor. 

It has consistently cooperated with the 
grower, the manufacturer, the shipper 
and the merchant, helping to make 
North Carolina the prosperous, progres- 
sive State that it is. 

THE 

WILMINGTON SAVINGS AND 

TRUST COMPANY 

"NORTH CAROLINA'S PORT BANK" 

COMMERCIAL • TRUST • SAVINGS 

Established 1888 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Member Federal Reserve System 



23 



POSTMASTER: If not delivered in 19 days, re- 
turn to Box 1619. State Ports Authority. 
Wilmington, N. C. Return Postage Guaranteed. 



Sec. 34.66. P. L. & R. 

U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Permit No. 225 



soRm caaoum swb await 



SHIP LAUNDRY 


One Day Service 

• 


IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 


CLEANERS, INC. 


FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE 6651 


WILMINGTON. N. C. 


"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



Cummins Diesel Sales 
Corporation 

TELEPHONES 6987-3702 

JOHN FAUNCE, Manager 

P. O. Box 1586 N. Main St Extension 

HIGH POINT. N. C. 




The Stamp of Approval 
is on 

MCLEAN SERVICE! 



M-LEAN 



^W 



General Offices • Winston-Salem, N. C. 
"WE PULL FOR INDUSTRY'' 



TERMINALS IN 11 STATES 
EQUIPPED TO SERVE YOU 



CONNECTICUT 


Durham 


Bridgeport 


Fayetteville 


Norwich 


Greensboro 


GEORGIA 

Atlanta 
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Kinston 
Rocky Mount 
Salisbury 


MARYLAND 


Shelby 


Baltimore 


Winston-Salem 


MASSACHUSETTS 


PENNSYLVANIA 


Boston 


Philadelphia 


Springfield 




Worcester 


RHODE ISLAND 


NEW JERSEY 


Providence 


Hawthorne 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


Jersey City 


Anderson 


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NEW YORK 


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Spartanburg 


NORTH CAROLINA 


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Charlotte 


Richmond 



Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 



SEPTEMBER, 1955 




rforiXfa (PaAolisuzr 



1: 



tffotekeacC &fy 



Luther 11. Hodges, Governor of North Carolina 




I 



I 
i 



. 



HEiDE & CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 



pVO'S AG e/v 



Cable Address 

'HEIDE" MOREHEADCITY-CAROLINA 

P. O. Box 322 

Telephone 6-3652 

R. L. HICKS, Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 




PETER B. RUFFIN, President W. P. EMERSON, Vice-President 

W. D. WILLIAMS, Secretary J. P. WILSON, Treasurer 

Wilmington Shipping Company 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 270 
Telephone 2-3381 



Cable Address 
WILSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT 

INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



PAVING CONTRACTORS 

Any Size Job Anywhere 

E. B. TOWLES 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

DIAL 2-0359 
Market Street Road 



m 

ASPHALT 
CONCRETE 

AND 
BITUMINOUS 

SURFACE 
TREATMENT 





NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 



September, 1955 



Volume I, No. 7 



Bryan Caldwell, Editor 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

EDWIN PATE 
Chairman 

RAYMOND A. BRYAN 
Vice-Chairman 

W. AVERY THOMPSON 
Secretary-Treasurer 

J. HARRY WHITE 
Member 

HARVEY W. MOORE 
Member 

HAROLD F. COFFEY 

Member 

HENRY A. LINEBERGER 

Member 

Executive Director 
RICHARD S. MARR 



TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT 

STEPHEN S. KOSZEWSKI 

E. E. LEE, JR. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

P. O. Box 1619— Telephone 3-1622 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN 

Terminal Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

P. O. Box 145— Telephone 6-3159 

J. D. HOLT 

Terminal Manager 

WALTER H. FRIEDERICHS 
Assistant 



SELL YOUR STATE PORTS 

This magazine is intended to be read by at least ten people. Please pass it 
on when you are through. 



Contents 



Governor Hodges 4 

Philippine Flag Arrives 5 

M. S. Stockholm to Sail 6 

Loading Tobacco, New German Freighter 7 

Visitors from the Orient „ 8 

First Shipment of Textile Machinery 9 

Fumigation Plant at Morehead City 10 

New Gantries at Wilmington 11 

Colonel Marr's Statement 12 

Comparative Rate Statement „1 3 

Port Construction Program 15 

Port Facilities, Wilmington 1 6 

Port Facilities, Morehead City 17 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

39 Broadway, Wing 618 

New York 6, N. Y. 

WILLIAM S. CHILDRESS 
New York Representative 



COVER 

A recent photograph of North Carolina's Governor Luther H. Hodges 



GoOeiHCi nonces 

STATE PORTS BOOSTER No. I 



With his long and successful experience as business- 
man, Governor Luther H. Hodges realizes the value to 
North Carolina of its two deep water State Ports and 
is a frequent and interested visitor at both the State 
Terminals in Morehead City and the State Docks in 
Wilmington. 

His attention to the development of these new facil- 
ities and his understanding of the problems that at- 
tend their growth are invaluable and inspiring to di- 
rectors of the North Carolina State Ports Authority 



and to the administration they have installed to operate 
them. 

Business is increasing at the State facilities, tonnage 
figures are climbing, the number of ships calling at 
the State Ports is constantly going up. As this happens, 
the economy of the state responds to the increased busi- 
ness. Thus there is profit for all in boosting the State 
Ports, and no one is more convinced than Governor 
Hodges, Booster Number 1. 



THE STORY OF LUTHER HARTWELL HODGES 



Luther Hartwell Hodges was born in Pittsylvania County, 
Virginia (just eight miles from his present home in Leaksville), 
March 9, 1898, the son of John James and Lovicia Gammon 
.Hodges. 

Attended public schools in Leaksville and Spray; graduated 
Leaksville High School in 1915; University of North Carolina 
1919, with A.B. degree (awarded honorary L.L.D. degree 
1946 by University of North Carolina). 

Worked as office boy in local textile plant, 1910-1911, and 
as mill hand summers; and in 1919, after graduation, became 



secretary to general manager of local mills; in 1938 was made 
general manager of all mills of Marshall Field & Co., and in 
1943 he became vice president of the corporation. 

Retired 1950, and spent over a year in West Germany as 
head of the industry division of the Economic Cooperation Ad- 
ministration. Was consultant to State Department in the latter 
months of 1951 on the International Management conference. 

Head of the textile division of the OPA in 1944, and con- 
sultant to Secretary of Agriculture in 1945. 

Active in community, State and National affairs through- 
continued on Page 14) 




North Carolina's 

Governor 

Luther T. Hodges 

and 

Mrs. Hodges 



Pkiliffi 

jiaa 
Unices 



me 



• • • 




The S. S. San Vinccnte, which recently called at 
Wilmington's State Docks, is the first ship flying the 
Philippine flag to use North Carolina State Ports fa- 
cilities. 

Built in 1919 at Long Beach, Calif., the freighter 
is owned by Victorias Milling Co., Manila, and is cur- 
rently operated by J. H. Winchester & Co. Wilmington 
Shipping Co. served as agent. 

Captain Benjamin Gepilano is master of the 5,590- 
ton vessel and keeps it in a painted up and polished 
condition which belies its age. The Captain, himself, is 
a six-footer of Spanish ancestry who boasts a long rec- 
ord of service with Victorias. 

World War II found him caught in the islands and 
kept on the beach, he said. On the morning that Manila 
received its surprise bombing, he added, he as chief 
mate had entered the examining hall to stand his ex- 



! 




^ 



'W\ 



Captain 
Benjamin 
Gepilano 



animation as master in the merchant marine. The first 
explosions brought to a halt any further proceedings 
in this connection, and it was several years later before 
he could find time to resume and gain his certificate. 

The San Vincente loaded 4,000 tons of surplus pow- 
dered milk during its Wilmington call, a cargo supplied 
by UNICEF, the United Nations' agency for children's 
relief. India was designated as destination of the ship- 
ment. 









M. S. STOCKHOLM to sail on JLuxutu Cruises 



Offering the ultimate in luxurious travel is a simple 
routine for the spotlessly sleek M. S. Stockholm, one of 
the crack transatlantic liners of the postwar period, 
and Carolinians know it and are taking advantage of it 
in droves, as reservations for the Tar Heel Cruises 
pile in. 

Already sold out is the Caribbean sailing of Novem- 
ber 23, but there still remains some choice space on the 
three Bermuda cruises earlier that month, according 
to latest word. 

The luxury liner is being pulled off its Atlantic 
schedule and will arrive at the State Docks in Wilming- 
ton in time for the first of the Bermuda trips Novem- 
ber 4. Additional sailings for Bermuda are scheduled 
from the State Docks for November 10 and Novem- 
ber 17. 

North Carolinians had their first opportunity to sail 
from one of their State Ports aboard the Swedish- 



American liner last fall when Allen Travel Service of 
New York ran a series of cruises departing from the 
State Port Terminal in Morehead City. That these 
proved a success may be judged from the enthusiasm 
of the hundreds of passengers who had nothing but 
praise for the ship's accommodations, food, entertain- 
ment, and service, while Bermuda, Nassau, and Cuba 
were described as island paradises and for shoppers 
veritable treasure chests of bargains. 

Passengers are served six repasts a day, the sixth be- 
ing an enormous midnight smorgasbord. Along with 
the usual shipboard concerts, horse races, and shuffle- 
board are provided trap shooting, two swimming pools, 
and Swedish massage. 

The Allen Travel concern is again organizing the 
cruises which this year depart from Wilmington and 
is handling reservations. Wilmington Chamber of Com- 
merce also provides information on the cruises. 




Anyone 

for 

Smorgasbord? 

This is 

a la 

M. S. Stockholm 



Captain 

Sjunne Olson 

at wheel of 

M. S. Stockholm 




hload'ma lobacco 

. . . NEW 

GERMAN 
FREIGHTER 



One of the newest ships to visit State Ocean Term- 
inals at Morehead City is the North German Lloyd's 
M. S. Baerenstein, built in 1953, which recently made 
a one-day call to load a cargo of tobacco at the State 
Port's docks. 

The ship, which was launched at Bremen, is named 
for a castle on the Rhine and is one of the line's "stein" 
fleet which is generally used to serve the South Amer- 
ican west coast. Other "stein" freighters are the Brand- 
enstein and Bieberstein. 

In addition to the latest in freighter facilities, the 
Baerenstein has stateroom space for six passengers. The 
possibility thus arises of booking transatlantic passage 
from North Carolina ports on occasional cargo ships. 
Advance information would have to be obtained from 
the shipping agent and arrangements made with the 
line operating the vessel. 

Master of the German vessel, a ship of 5,547 gross 
tons, is Capt. Karl Timmermann. He pointed out that 
the price of his passenger accommodations is in the 
same range as Second Class and Tourist Class tickets 
on the great ocean liners. "Our passengers seem very 
happy here," he said, mentioning the good food and 
spacious quarters. 

He served coffee. It was good. 

He unlocked a stateroom door and pointed around. 
It was spacious. In one room was sofa, chairs, and a 
table to form a living area which adjoined a bedroom 
complete with two three-quarter beds. 

During the call at this port, tobacco weighing ap- 
proximately 850,000 pounds was loaded. The cargo 
was supplied by an Eastern Carolina shipper and will 
be unloaded at Hamburg, consigned to one of Ger- 
many's largest tobacco dealers. 




PHOTO BY JERRY 9CHUMACHER 




^ <u 



CAPTAIN KARL TIMMERMANN 




At Morehcad City 




VISITORS ]lom the Orient . . . 



Two official visitors from the Orient have been in- 
specting the facilities and administration of the State 
Ports Authority with a view toward incorporating some 
of the modern methods and equipment in their home 
ports. 

They are Mr. Chang Shao Chow, deputy director of 
the port of Keelung, Formosa, and Mr. Antonio F. 
Villacorta port engineer of the Philippine port of 
Manila. 

Having previously inspected the great eastern ports 
of New York, Boston, and Philadelphia, both described 
those areas as so vast and impressive that they had dif- 
ficulty in visualizing the operations there transplanted 
to their home areas. With true Oriental courtesy, they 
noted that they expected to find no where the adminis- 
tration and facilities more up-to-date than at the North 
Carolina State Ports. And since the size of the ports did 
not stagger their imaginations they believed very great 
benefit would come of their inspection. They also 
found it very valuable to view facilities which were 
built with the idea of future expansion expressly incor- 
porated in their plans. 

While the size and importance of the port of Manila 
are well-known to Americans, it is not so widely realiz- 
ed that Keelung is one of the busiest ports of the Far 
East. Mr. Chang pointed out that over 90 per cent of 




all imports coming to Formosa — and this includes mili- 
tary equipment for the armies of Chiang Kai-Shek — 
move through Keelung. Mr. Chang made it clear that 
the ideas he would carry back would benefit not only 
his Formosan port but also the ports of mainland China, 
when Chiang's forces could land and take over, which 
he firmly believes will come about soon and by internal 
uprising. 

As an engineer, Mr. Villacorta is particularly in- 
terested in the construction and maintenance procedure 
he inspects. The port of Manila has two current prob- 
lems, he explained. It is still cluttered with sunken 
ships left from World War II, and the busy southern 
part of the port suffers from overcrowding. It will be 
his job to recommend new and improved facilities for 
the northern section of his harbor, and he is conse- 
quently looking into the most modern methods of con- 
struction and the most efficiently performing installa- 
tions. 

The two Oriental gentlemen spent a week on their 
visit to North Carolina. They centered their attention 
on S.P.A. headquarters and thoroughly inspected the 
State Docks and the State Terminals. In addition they 
made inspection trips to the mothball fleet and as 
guests of Col. William A. McAleer, to the Sunny Point 
Army Ammunition Loading Terminal. 



At Sunny Point 




ji'id ^kibmetxt ok textile Hlackivie\\i 

UTILIZES S. P. A. . . . 




The first movement of textile machinery through 
the State Ports, which was observed recently, marks the 
agency's entry into a field that is expected to grow into 
one of major importance. 

The modern port facilities near the heart of the 
textile business are believed bound to attract continu- 
ing and increasing shipments of similar cargoes. In 
fact, more shipments of textile equipment are tentative- 
ly scheduled for later this fall. 

On hand for the inaugural shipment were two 
Charlotte business executives instrumental in moving 
the machinery through the State Ports, W. A. Thoma- 
son, Jr. and W. Pat Hall. 

Mr. Thomason is president of Thomason Textile 
Service, Inc., which assembled the order for foreign 
purchasers, and Mr. Hall is president of Hall's Textile 
Machinery Co., which manufactured and hauled the 
cargo to Wilmington. 



The machinery was loaded aboard the S. S. Crete 
Avon to be landed in Rotterdam, with Enschede, The 
Netherlands, as destination. Consignee is J. F. Scholten 
& Zonen, N. V., which is setting up the first cotton 
mill in Europe to be completely equipped with Ameri- 
can machinery. Mr. Thomason's company is engineer- 
ing the job. 

Mr. Hall was most complimentary about the handl- 
ing of the shipment at State Docks. "It certainly is a 
pleasure," he said, "to deal with a port organization 
that unloads your trucks in such a short time. This 
means a great deal to us in our effort to keep our equip- 
ment rolling." 

Mr. Thomason, too, praised the handling at the State 
Docks and said he expected to schedule his next ship- 
ment through State facilities, later this year. 



Plant Taciiitie* 
to oe installed 
at 
Ttlcrlehead Gitxi 



Decision has been reached to install a 
40,000 square foot transit shed and a to- 
bacco fumigation plant at State Terminals 
in Morehead City. 

The fumigation equipment will be put in 
operation as an added inducement to ship- 
pers contemplating moving their cargoes 
through the State facilities. 

There has been a growing demand for 
fumigation service from tobaccomen in the 
large tobacco-growing areas behind More- 
head City, and the location here of such a 
plant will attract much additional commer- 
cial tonnage through this port. 

Detailed planning and the drawing up of 
specifications are under way. A single- 
chamber structure, equipped for hydrocy- 
anic and methyl bromide gases, is envision- 
ed, and loads of some 7,000 cubic feet caa 
be accommodated in a single operation. 

The contract for the dockside transit shed 
has been let to Steel Erectors Co. of Char- 
lotte and work has already been begun on 
footings and foundation. The structure will 
be of pre-fabricated steel, manufactured by 
Luria Engineering Co. of New York City. 
It will be supported by a single row of 
columns, and a canopy will be built to pro- 
tect cargoes being moved in the area be- 
tween the new building and the railroad 
tracks. 

The transit shed is expected to be finish- 
ed this fall. 




IMPORT COTTON— This cargo of cotton from India is being f umigaH 
ed immediately upon arrival at State Docks. This operation, required 
by law, is supervised by Department of Agriculture officers to se 



TOB 




fjj^i&0£\ 






EXPORT TOBACCO — Domestic tobacco moves out of railway cars st 
onto the dock of the waterside transit shed, into the shed, and finalll om 
out the other side and aboard ship. A hogshead of tobacco weigh! 05 
about 1,000 pounds and 38 are carried in a freight car. Unloading a en 



ON 








■a**. • $L 



their procedure is followed. Indian cotton has a staple that is rel- 
ely short and thick. It is used with other cottons to give feel and 
ilk to such items as blankets and rugs. 



DCO 




live Hew 
CtanfaieA 
GutkolUed iol 
Wilvnincton 
Pat 



Plans to buy and install two new gantry 
cranes for the State Docks at Wilmington 
have been announced, and specifications for 
them have already been drawn up. 

The North Carolina Division of Purchase 
and Contract is expected to ask for bids in 
the very near future. 

Progress at the State Port has required 
the installation of this equipment. Addition- 
al business is being offered, and in order to 
handle it the cranes have become a pressing 
necessity. 

With these additional installations, the 
schedule of development has run ahead of 
the original expansion plans, since it was 
formerly believed that one gantry might be 
required to operate alone for about a year 
before the second crane would become re- 
quired equipment. 

Gantries perform the heaviest lifts. As 
the volume of business expands at the State 
Docks, it is noted that in some instances a 
cargo offered for handling may contain one 
or two items beyond the lifting power of 
present equipment. Since the alternatives 
are to handle the whole shipment or to de- 
cline the business, the need to install the 
new equipment has become increasingly ap- 
parent. 

An even greater increase in tonnage pass- 
ing through the State Docks will result .li- 
ter the cranes begin operation, it is confi- 
dently expected. 



ir is a precision operation taking some 20 or 30 minutes, or something 
onsiderably less than one minute per hogshead. Photo showing tobac- 
a swinging aboard ship was made at Morehead City's N. C. Ocean 
terminals. 



. . . . Uolonel lYiaVis Statement . . . . 



INCREASE COMING 
FOR MOREHEAD CITY 

Ocean Terminals at Morehead City move an impres- 
sive half a million tons annually and are well on their 
way for 1955 with over 269 thousand tons shown for 
the first half of this year. 

Traffic at the State Terminals in the greatest part 
consists of bulk cargoes from tankers and includes gaso- 
line, oil, and oil products such as lube and asphalt. 
Over 151 thousand tons handled the first six months 
of 1955 were of this category. 

Another great part of the traffic is composed of mili- 
tary equipment, usually for the Marine encampments 
at Cherry Point and Camp Lejeune. These shipments 
for 1955 through June totaled over 114 thousand 
tons. 

It is in the commercial general cargo field that the 
great opportunity for increase of traffic at State Termi- 
nals lies. In 1954 over six thousand tons of this cate- 
gory were handled, and prospects are excellent for in- 
creasing the figure in 1955. The first half of this year 
saw more than 3.8 thousand tons pass through the 
State facilities here, and cargoes already scheduled to 
move during the rest of the year are encouragingly 
high. 

Tobacco is the product which forms the bulk of 
general cargoes shipped through the State Terminals 
and is the item to which the facilities especially cater. 
To make the Terminals even more attractive to tobacco 
shippers, the State Ports Authority has authorized the 
construction of a tobacco fumigation plant, specifica- 
tions for which are being drawn up. It is expected this 
plant will go into operation in the late winter or early 
spring, and afterward tobacco shipments will increase 
to an even greater level. 



SPURT IN TONNAGE 
AT WILMINGTON 

Wilmington's State Docks has recently moved ton- 
nage at a figure dramatically greater than amounts pre- 
viously handled, and the increased level of business 
is expected to be maintained throughout the year to 
make another record, according to present indications. 

In 1956, the two gantry cranes which are being 
placed on order will go into operation, and another 
spurt in tonnage is confidently expected. 

During the first half of 1955, State Docks moved 
117,605 tons of cargo. This amounts to more than 
five times the tonnage moved in the comparable period, 
1954. 

It is also noteworthy that the amount handled in the 
first half of this year is greater than the total for 1954, 
which was 104,837. 

This high rate of increase will probably not continue, 
but there is every indication that the same high level 
of business seems most likely for the rest of 1955, to 
result in another record year. The tonnages already 
scheduled are ample to justify this estimate. 

The variety of items that move through the State 
Docks has also increased greatly, records show, and 
the cargoes already scheduled show that the State facil- 
ities will continue to move cargoes of items in the new 
fields which have been entered. 

North Carolinians are realizing in increasing num- 
bers that the State facilities are highly valuable to 
them, as business executives of the area increasingly 
utilize the State Ports to effect speed and economy. 



12 



Statement- showing com- 
parison of class rates from 
Wilmington, N. C, Balti- 
more, Md. and New York, 
N. Y. to representative 
Carolina and Midwestern 
points. 




FROM 







WILMINGTON, 

N. C. 


BALTIMORE, 
MD. 


NEW YORK, 
N. Y. 


TO 




1 


Classes 
2 


3 


1 


Classes 
2 


3 


1 


Classes 
2 


3 


Asheville, N. C. 




1.90 


1.62 


1.33 


2.36 


2.01 


1.65 


2.85 


2.42 


2.00 


Charlotte, N. C. 




1.46 


1.24 


1.02 


2.16 


1.84 


1.51 


2.60 


2.21 


1.82 


Chicago, 111. 


A 
B 


2.76 
2.66 


2.34 

2.24 


1.94 
1.85 


2.76 


2.34 


1.94 


2.84 


2.42 


1.97 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


A 
B 


2.52 
2.42 


2.15 

2.05 


1.77 
1.68 


2.52 


2.15 


1.77 


2.60 


2.23 


1.80 


Louisville, Ky. 


A 
B 


2.29 
2.19 


1.95 
1.85 


1.62 
1.53 


2.59 


2.20 


1.83 


2.67 


2.28 


1.86 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


A 
B 


2.87 
2.87 


2.44 
2.44 


2.01 
2.01 


2.87 


2.44 


2.01 


2.95 


2.52 


2.04 


St. Louis, Mo. 


A 
B 


2.76 
2.66 


2.34 

2.24 


1.94 

1.85 


3.00 


2.56 


2.11 


3.08 


2.64 


2.14 


Springfield, 111. 


A 
B 


2.76 
2.66 


2.34 
2.24 


1.94 
1.85 


2.92 


2.49 


2.05 


3.00 


2.57 


2.08 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 




1.53 


1.30 


1.07 


1.96 


1.67 


1.37 


2.41 


2.05 


1.69 



A — Applicable only on traffic imported from countries not located in Europe or Africa. 
B — Applicable only on traffic imported from Europe and Africa. 




TAR HEEL CRUISES . . . 

x.ekt pom ulcAzkeab Hast Octooel 




Tugboat Manie maneuvers the cruise ship alongside Ocean 
Terminals dock 



THE STORY OF 
LUTHER T. HODGES 

(Continued from Page 4) 

out career; organized one of first vocational schools in the 
state; taught 10 years in night school. 

He has served as lay leader and steward of Leaksville Meth- 
odist Church. A Mason, he has been associated with the Boy 
Scouts, and is a former commander of his local American Le- 
gion post. 

Organized and first Secretary of the Leaksville-Spray Rotary 
Club, and later Governor of North Carolina Rotary Clubs; 
President New York City Rotary Club; International Director 
Rotary, 1953-54. 

Served as world-wide campaign chairman of the American 
Leprosy Society. Served as state chairman for the North Caro- 
lina Society for Crippled Children campaign, and the state 
Cancer campaign and the state United Fund campaign. 

Has been a member of the Y.M.C.A. since 1910; served as 
member of the board of Southern Y.M.C.A. Industrial confer- 
ence, also Silver Bay conference and Metropolitan Y.M.C.A., 
New York City. 

Elected Lieutenant-Governor of North Carolina in Novem- 
ber, 1952, and succeeded to governorship in November, 1954. 

Married Miss Martha Blakeney of Union County in 1922. 
Two daughters, Betsy (Mrs. D. M. Bernard, Jr.) of Anacortes, 
Washington; Nancy (Mrs. John C. Finlay) of New Delhi, 
India, and one son, Luther, Jr., a sophomore at the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. 



PHOTOS BY CLIFTON GUTHRIE 

Tar Heel cruisers clamber up the gangway 
Airing the bunting lends note of gaiety 

PHOTO BY RAY CONNER 



~7* V 






I'- 



* \ 



' 



-'4 



*•** ^ m 

^VtfC K HOI 

ff & tt T d B Off 




\\ 



Don't UNDERESTIMATE 

the Pdt Construction i\oa^am . . . 



By ROGER H. GILMAN, Director of Port Development, The Port of New York Authority 
(Reprinted from WORLD PORTS June 1955 Issue) 



For many years prior to World War II, only a modest 
amount of construction of piers and wharves was un- 
dertaken in the United States. There has therefore 
been a tendency to be critical of the port industry at 
large. "Woefully inadequate" and "Fifty years behind 
the times" are phrases still used today. Such catch 
phrases of papers presented five and ten years ago, are 
today misleading. A noteworthy building program has 
been underway in the last few years. 

At the Port of New York Authority, we have follow- 
ed these programs closely, with constant research from 
published sources on what is actually being built in the 
nation's harbors, not the dream plans for future proj- 
ects. Our figures are necessarily on the conservative 
side since many improvements, especially private and 
industrial construction, are not adequately publicized. 

We carry on this research in order to obtain a rela- 
tive measure of what has been accomplished in the 
New York-New Jersey Harbor, where $90,000,000 has 
been spent on waterfront improvements since the end 
of the World War II. We are quite proud of the many 
new and modernized facilities that the Port of New 
York has to offer. 

Our research discloses that in the ten years since 
World War II, a total of some $485,000,000 has been 
spent on piers, wharves, and docks alone in the United 
States for the handling of bulk and general cargoes. 
This total figure was expended jFor waterside facilities 
only. It does not include many other construction proj- 
ects in the broad field of port development which have 
also been built at these harbors, such as bridges, tun- 
nels, expressways, airports, railroad yards and other 
transportation facilities. 

These expenditures for waterside facilities include 
both public and private construction, that is, funds ex- 
pended by public port agencies, as well as funds ex- 
pended by private industry for marine terminal con- 
struction where these are known. The expenditures in- 
clude the cost of structure only, not the cost of cargo 



handling equipment, such as cranes, lift trucks and the 
like. 

The total nation-wide expenditure of $485,000,000 
is made up of $183,000,000 spent on construction of 
new general cargo facilities with 147 ship berths; 
$114,000,000 for the modernization and rehabilita- 
tion of existing general cargo facilities; and $188,000,- 
000 for specialized facilities such as ore and other bulk 
commodity terminals. 

The great bulk of this money was spent by state, bi- 
state, city or county agencies responsible for port de- 
velopment. These public projects were financed in 
some cases by revenue bonds and in others by tax-sup- 
ported bond issues, without Federal participation. Thus 
the local citizenry, through its financial support, has 
endorsed the development of the various port areas. 

In the foreseeable future, we find no sign that this 
nationwide port building and modernization program 
will diminish in tempo. In fact, there is every indica- 
tion that it will increase. Impressive long-range build- 
ing plans continue to be projected at seaboard ports. 
The obvious impact of the St. Lawrence Seaway on 
Great Lakes port construction, plus the less dramatic 
but very real new terminal program taking place on the 
nation's inland waterways may well swell the total for 
the next ten years far beyond the already impressive 
figure for the last ten years. 

The function that a -port facility such as a general 
cargo pier performs in the transportation system makes 
it an indispensable clement in oar overall economx. A 
GFNERAL CARGO PIER, BY ITS VERY NATURE. 
IS A GENERATOR OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY. A 
relatively small investment in pier facilities pays hand- 
some dividends by increasing all commercial activiti 
and enhancing the prosperity of tlie community. 

As creditable as the achievement in port develop- 
ment has been in the last ten years, our port industry 
must continue to develop and expand if the transporta- 
tion needs of our dynamic economy are to be fulfilled. 



15 





. 






»"V.4L p^( 




Wilminctcn 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN, Terminal Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It is cap- 
able of berthing three 500-foot vessels simultaneous- 
ly, with depth of 32 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 
square feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

OPEN STORAGE : Three acres of paved open storage, 
easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron; also depressed tracks at 
rear of transit sheds and warehouse, entire length. 
Storage yard on property for 240 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two Diesel switching locomo- 
tives. 

One 35-ton locomotive crane and one 25-ton loco- 
motive crane. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of va- 
rious sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. 

Light and heavy tractors and trailers and straddle 
trucks. Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck docks 
for loading and unloading at the transit sheds and 
warehouse; ramps for easy access into sheds and 
warehouse; portable side and end loading ramps for 
rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumiga- 
tion plant with two chambers of 7,225 cubic feet 
each; equipped for HCN and methyl bromide. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally-ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. 

Export crating service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Sea- 
board Air Line Railroad Companies and numerous 
highway motor transportation companies. 

Office space available for freight forwarders, steam- 
ship agents, and other commercial personnel. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



16 



xes 




uloH.eM.zab G(fu 

J. D. HOLT, Terminal Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 2,5 50 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is cap- 
able of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one 
petroleum tanker, with a depth of 30 feet at mean 
low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60,000 square 
feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinklers. 

One transit shed, 32,000 square feet, constructed 
of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 

A third transit shed, the newest, is of pre-fabricated 
steel construction with sprinklers and has capacity 
of 40,000 square feet. 

WAREHOUSES: Two storage warehouses, totaling 
88,000 square feet,. with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: A paved open storage area is avail- 
able. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. At- 
lantic and East Carolina Railway freight car stor- 
age yard adjacent to Port property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cot- 
ton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletiza- 
tion of cargoes. 

Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Equipment for the loading of 
grain in ships or barges available. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easy access into transit shells and 
warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Proposed for later date. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. 

Served by Atlantic and East Carolina Railway Co. 

One interstate truck line on propcrtv. and served bv 
numerous highway motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on dutv at all times. 



17 



You 

See 

This 

Space 

Many 

Others 

Do 




AMERICAN HARDWARE 
& EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALERS 
HARDWARE, AGRICULTURAL 
IMPLEMENTS AND BUILDING 
SUPPLIES • SERVING THE 
CAROLINAS SINCE 1913 • 



Charlotte, N. C. • Wilmington, N. C. • Greenville, S. C. 
Home Office: Charlotte, N. C. 



It 

Can Help 

You 

Sell 

Your 
Services 

or 
Products 



Isthmian Steamship Company 

71 Broadway New York 6. N. Y. 

India, Pakistan, Ceylon 
Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq 
Thailand, Burma 
Hawaiian Islands 

Malaya, Philippines, Hong Kong 
Indonesia, Indo-China, Viet Nam 
Alexandria, Lebanon, Red Sea 
North Atlantic & Gulf Intercoastal 

Wilmington Agents 
C. D. Maffitt Company Tel. Wilmington 6824 



PROVISIONS. DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 

International Paint 

Socony- Vacuum Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone 4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



CAPE FEAR 
TOWING COMPANY 

TUG SERVICE 
MARINE CONSTRUCTION 

Office Phone 2-3073 — Night 2-2762 

WILMINGTON. NORTH CAROLINA 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of 

Steamship Piers. Railroad Trestles and Bridges and 

Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK. N. Y. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE — WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 

GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and to 

abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, dolphins, 

rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in nse at the N. C. State docks 
at both Wilmington and Morehead City. N. C. 



Complete Banking Services . 

Serving .... 

Eastern North Carolina For 
Over Half A Century .... 

We offer you Import and Export Letters of 
Credit . . . 

Foreign Exchange, Draft or Cable . . . 

Travelers Cheques and Letters of Credit. 



Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

Member Federal Reserve System 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

TELEPHONE 6-4652 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 



Peter B. Ruffin 

President 

W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 



William T. Davies 

Manager 



W. D. Williams 

Secretary 

J. P. Wilson 

Treasurer 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder Registration No. 376 



HEIDE AND CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



FORWARDING AGENTS 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 
STEVEDORES 



WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 




Cable Address 

"HEIDE" WILMINGTON-CAROLINA 

Telephone 3-5161 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 223 



READY TO SERVE . . . 

Your Port Of Wilmington Needs 

In every phase of the agricultural and 
industrial development of North Caro- 
lina, this bank has been an important 
factor. 

It has consistently cooperated with the 
grower, the manufacturer, the shipper 
and the merchant, helping to make 
North Carolina the prosperous, progres- 
sive State that it is. 

THE 

WILMINGTON SAVINGS AND 

TRUST COMPANY 

"NORTH CAROLINA'S PORT BANK" 

COMMERCIAL • TRUST • SAVINGS 

Established 1888 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Member Federal Reserve System 



19 



POSTMASTER: If not delivered in 10 days, re- 
turn to Box 1619. State Ports Authority. 
Wilmington, N. C. Return Postaee Guaranteed. 






Sec. 34.66. P. 


L. & R. 


U. S. Postage 


PAID 




Wilmington, 


N.C. 


Permit No. 


225 



SHIP LAUNDRY 


One Day Service 

• 


IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 


CLEANERS, INC. 


FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE 6651 


WILMINGTON, N. C. 


"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



Cummins Diesel Sales 
Corporation 

TELEPHONES 6987-3702 

JOHN FAUNCE, Manager 

P. O. Box 1586 N. Main St. Extension 

HIGH POINT. N. C. 

LACIE BUIE, Sales Representative 




The Stamp of Approval 
is on 

MCLEAN SERVICE! 



TERMINALS IN 11 STATES 
EQUIPPED TO SERVE YOU 



M-LEAN 



^W 



General Offices • Winston-Salem, N. C. 



"WE PULL FOR INDUSTRY' 



CONNECTICUT 

Bridgeport 

Hartford 

Norwich 

GEORGIA 

• Atlanta 
Augusta 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 

Springfield 

Worcester 

NEW JERSEY 

Hawthorne 
Jersey City 
New Brunswick 

NEW YORK 

Albany 

Brooklyn 

New York City 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Asheville 
Burlington 



Charlotte 

Durham 

Fayetteville 

Greensboro 

Hickory 

Kinston 

Rocky Mount 

Salisbury 

Shelby 

Winston-Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Philadelphia 

RHODE ISLAND 

Providence 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Anderson 

Charleston 

Columbia 

Greenville 

Hartsville 

Spartanburg 

VIRGINIA 

Danville 

Lynchburg 

Richmond 



1 



WINTEP 

1956 



Morth Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 







HEIDE & CO., INC. 

STE^MShlP AGENTS AND, 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 



v> oY SL^O 



Cable Address 

"HEIDE" MOREHEADCITY-CAROLINA 

P. O. Box 322 

Telephone 6-3652 

R. L. HICKS, Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY. NORTH CAROLINA 




PETER B. RUFFIN, President 
W. D. WILLIAMS, Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON, Vice-President 
J. P. WILSON, Treasurer 



Wilmington Shipping Company 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 270 
Telephone 2-3381 



Cable Address 
WILSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT 

INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



PAVING CONTRACTORS 

Any Size Job Anywhere 

E. B. TOWLES 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

DIAL 2-0359 
Market Street Road 



\sr^^^^^tE^n^ 





ASPHALT 
CONCRETE 

AND 
BITUMINOUS 

SURFACE 
TREATMENT 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 



WiviKii, 1956 



Voi.l we I. No. 8 



Bryan Cai.dwkll, Editor 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

EDWIN PATE 
Chairman 

RAYMOND A. BRYAN 

Vice-Chairman 

W. AVERY THOMPSON 

Secretary-Treasurer 

J. HARRY WHITE 

Member 

HARVEY W. MOORE 

Member 

HAROLD F. COFFEY 

Metnber 

HENRY A. LINEBERGER 

Member 



EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
RICHARD S. MARR 

TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT 

STEPHEN S. KOSZEVVSKI 
E. E. LEE, JR. 



WIEMINGTON OFFICE 

P. O. Box 1619— Telephone 3-1622 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN 

Operations Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

P. O. Box 14 5— Telephone 6-3159 

J. D. HOLT 

Operations Manager 

WALTER H. FRIEDERICHS 

Assistant 



SELL YOUR STATE PORTS 

This magazine is intended to be read by at least ten people. Please pass it 
on when you are through. 



Ucntents 



Cotton Sampling Taught by Experts 4 

Spanish Dance and Song 5 

Two Nations Meet at the State Docks 6, 7 

Visitors from Latin America 8 

Tobacco at Morehead City 8 

Maidens 9 

Wilmington Fumigation 9 

U. S. Marines 10, 11 

Animals from India Turn Docks into Zoo ._ 12, 13 

Tar Heel Cruises Depart from State Docks 14 

Colonel Marr's Statement 1 5 

Port Facilities, Wilmington 16 

Port Facilities, Morehead City 17 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

39 Broadway, Wing 618 
New York 6, N. Y. 

WILLIAM S. CHILDRESS 

New York Representative 



COVER 

Boiler parts being loaded for Spain arc sliown at cercmom marking first 
utilization of the port by one of Wilmington's newest industrial plants. 
Babcoek & Wilcox. 

(PHOTO BY CALHOUN) 



S. J. Bennett, southeastern 
states manager for Robert- 
son & Son, who demonstrat- 
ed the sampling techniques. 



Uottcn ^y amp Una 
TAUGHT BY EXPERTS 




Experts Teach Cotton Sampling To Warehousing Staff 



To the world's cotton trade, Edward T. Robertson 
& Son stands in relatively the same position as Tiffany 
to the jewelry business. It is virtually a household word. 
After that has been said it becomes unnecessary to de- 
scribe their organization and services on which stand 
a reputation that has taken generations to build. 




Consequently it was to Robertson & Son that the 
N. C. State Docks hrst turned when it became appar- 
ent that import cotton would be a continuing and 
growing cargo for this installation. Among the serv- 
ices which consignees rightfully expect is the careful 
sampling of imported cotton on its arrival, and in this 
activity there are techniques and procedures which the 
State Docks management felt it necessary to carry out 
quickly and efficiently. 

When informed recently that a large shipment of 
India cotton would again be unloaded here, the Docks 
management made arrangements with Robertson & 
Son, and these international cotton controllers sent 
their manager in the southeastern states, S. J. Bennett, 
to be on hand. 

By practical demonstration and otherwise, he show- 
ed the correct method of sampling and of efficiently se- 
curing the bale after samples had been taken. Mem- 
bers of the warehousing staff practiced under Mr. 
Bennett's eye until they convinced him of their under- 
standing and skill. 

(Please turn to Page 18) 



Left top — Expert advice on securing the hale properly after 
sampling helps warehousing staff master the procedure. 
Left bottom — Inspecting a bale that has been sampled and 
secured are Port Manager Sullivan, Mr. Bennett and ware- 
houseman. 

Beloiv — Cotton samples from various sections of a bale are 
looked over before being divided and sent to consignees and 
other parties interested in the shipment. 

(PHOTOS BY OOBSON) 




(ypanim Ut 



i^/ance aw 

LEND TO CEREMON 



2 ^OHG 



SPA was celebrating: the first cargo was moving 
from the Wilmington plant of Babcock & Wilcox over 
the State Docks. B. & W. was celebrating: the first 
cargo of boiler components ordered by Westinghouse 
International was being delivered. And Westinghouse 



was celebrating: the movement of this cargo meant the 
start of building a multi-million dollar plant in north- 
ern Spain. So there was a gala ceremony complete with 
dancing, speeches, and feasting. 




. . . two nations THeet at the Qtate 



Editorial Reprinted from The Wilmington Star 



The meaning of world trade was brought home 
dramatically to Wilmingtonians who attended the well- 
arranged ceremonies, on the docks of the State Ports 
Authority's terminals, marking the loading of 400 tons 
of boiler components aboard the Spanish freighter, SS 
Motomar, yesterday. 

This equipment will become part of the multi-mil- 
lion dollar Central de Lada power plant in northern 
Spain. 

When this plant goes into operation, it will be com- 
parable in size and output to the recently completed 
project of the Carolina Power and Light Company at 
nearby Mt. Misery. Its supply of electricity it going to 
mean a better life for untold thousands of Spaniards. 

Already, it has meant a richer life for many Wil- 
mingtonians. 

Here is where the boiler components were made by 
Babcock and Wilcox Company and sold to Westing- 
house International. But this would not have been en- 
couraged locally without the deep-water shipping fa- 
cilities of the State Port. The terminals were one of 
the reasons B. & W. selected Wilmington as the site 
of the new plant. 



Thus the value of the State Ports in terms of local 
employment was emphasized anew. 

But that wasn't all. 

The ceremonies yesterday were marked by a warm 
spirit of international goodwill. Here were the people 
of one country doing something for another with the 
result that the living standards of both will be raised. 
Nations cannot fight when that spirit prevails. As one 
speaker pointed out, this was a sincere effort for "ever- 
lasting peace." The keystone was the docks upon which 
those words were spoken. 

To those present who have worked for unlimited 
realization of the State Ports dream, the significance 
was thrilling. Here, with the ship at the wharf and 
the cargo swinging aboard, was the State Ports story 
in action. All the promises of a better economy for 
North Carolina were being fulfilled. But, above and be- 
yond past dreams, the factor of trade for peace was 
being activated. 

The scene was one in which thoughtful North 
Carolinians could not escape a feeling of abundant 
pride. In those comparatively few minutes, Wilmington 
was tied closely with Spain in a bond which we be- 
lieve and hope will be strengthened as both work for 
the best interests of the other. 



John H. Jacobs, special representative of Westinghouse Inter- Another key went to W. D. Sullivan, Vice-President of Bab- 

national, received a key to the city from Wilmington's Mayor cock & Wilcox. B. &- W. located its North Carolina plant in 

Dan D. Cameron. Wilmington in order to have access to deep water facilities for 

overseas shipments. 




Jock 



Chief speaker was Edwin Gill, State treasurer, 
shown at right, with Colonel Marr, center, 
handing presents of North Carolina origin to 
the ship's captain for delivery to the mayor of 
Gijon, northern Spanish port where the cargo 
will be discharged. Mr. Gill said that with the 
joining of industry and transportation, as witnessed 
by the day's event, North Carolina can grow to take 
its place as leader among the 48 states. 




The captain's luncheon for three dozen business leaders and local and state officials topped off the ceremony with a menu of 
rare Spanish delicacies. The captain introduced officials of Garcia & Diaz of New York, who operated the vessel on this voy- 
age, and of Wilmington Shipping Co., local agents. (Insert^) The serious business of loading continued through the cere- 
monies and afterward. The boiler parts are not particularly heavy but are big and require considerable care in handling. 





Visitors 



FROM LATIN AMERICA 

Three Guatemalans, visiting this country under the 
Government's Point Four program, studied procedures 
at the North Carolina State Ports before returning 
home to manage their brand new facilities at Puerto 
Santo Tomas. 

They are Mamerto Marroquin, Francisco Menendez, 
and Miguel Angel Quintana and were selected by the 
Guatemalan government because of their experience 
and background to observe operations at a number of 
United States ports. Their purpose was to master the 
most modern techniques of port management in order 
to transplant them to their Latin-American installation. 

The three interviewed officials at Wilmington's 
State Docks and at Morehead City's Ocean Terminals, 
and talked at some length to officers of Wilmington 
Shipping Co. and Heide & Co. 

Their visit to the State Ports finished their period of 
study, which had taken them to a wide variety of 
Southern ports along the Gulf and in South Atlantic 
states. The dedication of the Santo Tomas facilities is 
scheduled soon after their- return home, early this 
vear. 




(PHOTO BY 8CHUMACHER) 



The Gloria and the Aki Maru, along 
with the Tuebingen shown on oppo- 
site page, are three recent ships to 
call at Morehead City Terminals for 
tobacco. 



Signing ship's papers takes attention 
of Aki's skipper, Capt. T. Hoshi, 
whose severely furnished cabin is 
livened by picture of dancing girl. 




x>««»«ofey^^S^iP 



7*fc 



acco 



AT MOREHEAD CITY 

Tobacco shipments out of Morehead City's Ocean 
Terminals brought calls from 1 ships during the year 
and a tonnage movement amounting to almost nine 
million pounds. This is a gain of more than one mil- 
lion two hundred thousand pounds over the tobacco 
tonnage exported the previous year, when this business 
brought four ships to the State Terminals. 

In 1955 the tobacco total amounted to 8,998,000 
pounds and in 1954 to 7,756,000 pounds. 
(Please turn to Page 18) 



Guatemalans inspect facilities at Morehead City with opera- 
tions manager. (photo by Schumacher) 



Tobacco warehousing at Ocean Terminals is new service in- 
augurated recently and expected to quardruple this year. 



r*. 



IE D0W-.HEM 
jtLMINCTON 
• DEL 





A Hamburg-American Line freighter, the Tuehingcn, arrives 
at State Terminals on the fourteenth day of its maiden voyage. 
Its master, Capt. Wenk, is shown center. 



(PHOTO BY SCHUMACHER) 




called at the two 
display their trim, 



g^- 
inc 

additions 



to shipping 



Ships on their maiden v» 
State Ports to pick up oargoe 
glistening forma the ncwe 
lines of long tradition. 

It was the MS Tuebink-n ipf the Hamburg-America 
line that'trcd ub at MorehcarJ City's Ocean Terminals 
and loaded tobacco. Another *fir«" \tas observed at 
this event, the (first! movement of tobacco from More- 
head City to Holland. Paijt of thp load was to be dis- 
charged at Rptjteraain. Often teforey tobacco cargoes 
had been solicited kpV the Dutch: tracty-, but this was 
the beginning for. s^cli rnovepj^nt and thus proved 
something of A milestone in the progress^of the port. 

To the Tuebingen's skipper" there was nothing new 
(Please turn to Page 18) 




%N3 



Y i 



VsflSi , 




Tugs maneuver the Rita Maersk alongside the State Docks, it is tied up, the gangway comes down, and the master, ). C. Lindberg, goes ashore. 




minaicn 



■h 



'S 



umiaauoH 



ih 




Sometimes it is cotton imported from Egypt or 
India, and sometimes it is export tobacco, that is load- 
ed on the trailer trains at N. C. State Docks for fumi- 
gation. But the procedure remains the same. Assistant 
Warehouse Supervisor Al Smith backs through the 
fumigation chamber and directs the driver. The doors 
are closed and dogged down. Then the gas, hydro- 
cyanic in this case, is turned on. Watching every step 
of the process to check time and pressure is a represen- 
tative of the U. S. Department of Agriculture's Plant 
Quarantine branch. The officer shown below is Q. L. 
Chapman of New York City. 



U. S. MARINES 



tan 



e coel . . . 



The Second Marine Division poured personnel and 
equipment through Morehead City's N. C. Ocean 
Terminals day after day as it embarked to participate 
in Lantphibex, the season's major amphibious exercise, 
which was climaxed in storming ashore a little farther 
down the coast at Onslow Beach. 

Before embarkation was completed, 7,000 Marines 
and their trucks, tanks, cranes, and other material 
loaded on 39 ships. 

Motor convoys poured into the area from Camp 
Lejeune and took over a staging area of some two 




million square feet at the Terminals. From there the 
loading proceeded at the Terminals' live berths and 
three LST ramps. 

The State Docks at Wilmington participated in the 
operation to a smaller extent, as four ships connected 
with Lantphibex tied up there for loading. 

Top officers of the Second Marine Division em- 
barked at the Ocean Terminals — the commanding gen- 
eral, Gen. Reginald H. Ridglcy, Jr., aboard the USS 
Taconic, and assistant division commander, Gen. Wal- 
lace M. Greene, aboard the USS Cambria. 



/. At mid-loading point, SS Siher Manner, chartered for mili- 
tary duty, tics up in, tli r direction of L SS Cambria, shown 

how on, while tanfs in lu.c I'/roifid ,ircai,t from Staging 
area toward LST'docRi to 'ocil ai >ard qmvhihioui 'trjift. . 

2. Mobile cranes, probabty the most awkward vehicles to. Be 

handled, move smoothly cjboard the LSI S. ; ' • 
i. The Marines' tanks line Up' ml Staging' arfa,'ticjnre being 
loaded on hoard a variety of vessels. 

4. The military movement engulfs Wilmington's State Docks 
to a lesser degree, as vehicles swing aboard the Capricornus, 
there, where four transports loaded. 

5. Gen. Greene, assistant division commander, is piped on 
board the Cambria at the Terminals docks. 

6. Gen. Ridglcy, commanding the Second Marine Division, 
(standing) boards the USS Taconic at State Terminals and 
immediately begins going over battle plans. 

7. Trucks and trailers move on board an LCU and LST. 

8. And there's always the ammo. Net after net carries Marine 
mortar ammunition onto the Navy transports. 





fam INDIA 

TURN DOCKS M ZOO 



When the Isthmian freighter Steel Surveyor tied 
up recently at the State Docks, arrangements had been 
made to unload a rhinoceros of an unusual yellowish 
color named "Golden Boy." 

At the last minute, it was decided to move ashore 
all the wild animals from India that the ship was 
carrying; so 11 baby elephants and crates full of 
snakes, birds, monkeys were lifted over the side and 
onto the wharf. 

Visitors who had come to admire the rhino were 
treated to a view of a practically full-blown zoo. 

On hand for the unloading was F. J. Zeehandelaar, 
who heads the animal department of the North At- 
lantic Fertilizer & Chemical Co., Inc., of New York. 
It was his company which had contracted for the ship- 
ment. His letter recalling the event came to the SPA 
executive director a short time later. It is reprinted, as 
follows : 

Dear Col. Marr: 

Only today I find the time to write you a letter in 
reference to the recent unloading of live stock at the 
port of Wilmington, North Carolina, ex the S/S "Steel 
Surveyor." I have been very much tied up both with 
the livestock from this shipment and with the annual 



PASSENGERS TOO ARRIVE ON ANIMAL SHIP 

One of the most interesting passengers to land is young Miss 
Gurdip Singh of New Delhi. She is an exchange student and 
is spending the winter at school in Atlanta as guest of the 
Atlanta Rotary Club. Shown above she is being greeted by her 
Wilmington host, Graham Walton, who as president of Wil- 
mington Rotary arranged her transportation to Atlanta. 




convention of the American Institute of Park Execu- 
tives which was held shortly thereafter in Louisville, 
Ky. 

I wish to express my highest appreciation for the 
most efficient and helpful way in which this matter 
was handled, particularly under the unusual, difficult 
circumstances which do not have to be recalled at this 
time. 

You are familiar with the problems that came up 
only a few hours before docking of that steamer and 
with the many problems that arose in addition during 
the unloading of the steamer. Furthermore, the unload- 
ing of a cargo of wild animals is always a complicated 
matter; the unloading of such a cargo under the cir- 
cumstances at that time is more complicated than any- 
thing else. 

The North Carolina State Ports Authority, the offi- 
cers and employees, did a most wonderful job and 
many of them rendered assistance far beyond their 
duty and in some cases even without special remunera- 
tion as far as we are concerned. 

The whole procedure was in striking contrast to any 
other port in the East Coast of the United States where 
we have previously unloaded such cargoes. All laws 
and regulations that apply to all aspects of such an un- 
loading and particularly to such an unloading under 
such strange circumstances were applied with common 
sense and cooperation as I have never seen before. This, 
of course, also refers to the agencies and parties that 
are not under your control, such as immigration, cus- 
toms, Department of Agriculture, Coast Guard, steve- 
dores, custom brokers, ship chandlers, longshoremen, 
etc. 

I will appreciate if you will in some way find a pos- 
sibility to express my sincere gratitude to everyone con- 
cerned . . . 

If at all practical in the future and if steamers out 
of foreign countries are in line for our shipments and 
are touching Wilmington, we shall try and use your 
port facilities again. 

Sincerely yours, 

NORTH ATLANTIC FERTILIZER 
& CHEMICAL CO. 

/S/F. J. Zeehandelaar 



Y 9 ^fl 




4£? ■. 



h 



"Golden Boy," a brownish yelloiv rhinoceros weighing well over a ton, posed a problem. He and his sturdy 
cage had to be swung onto the dock and lifted into a covered truck. The beast kept still while his cage was in 
the air and the lifts were carried out with ease. Wilmington Shipping Co. was agent and stevedores. 



(PHOTO BY CALHOUN) 




Capt. G. E. Sundbcrg, master of Isthmian freighter Steel Surveyor, points out the baby elephants to his baby 
daughter. Crowds came aboard to gawk at the unusual cargo, and it was rainy and dusk when the Indian 
elephant boy got his charges ashore. 



(PHOTO BY CALHOUN) 



*m- 



' <\ A 




Flowers for the Governor's wife and a bontonniere for the 
Governor. Pinning the flower in place is Mrs. G. B. (Katherine 
Harriss) Bycrs, secretary to SPA Director, Colonel Marr. 



The Governor says goodbye to A. E. Jones, Chamber of Com- 
merce president, just before the ship prepares to sail. 



(PHOTO BY CALHOUN) 



lal Heel Gtuises 
DEPART FROM STATE DOCKS 



The Tar Heel Cruises were again scheduled through 
a State Ports facility when the Allen Travel Service 
chose Wilmington's State Docks as the point of em- 
barkation for the 1955 season. 

The luxury liner MV Stockholm put out on four 
voyages, and Wilmington's Chamber of Commerce 
held a celebration to mark the beginning of cruise 
season. 

Chief speaker at the event was State Ports Commis- 
sioner W. Avery Thompson. He pointed out that the 
Stockholm was the first cruise ship to leave the city in 
30 years and went on to show that through history the 
great cities of the world, with no more than a half- 
dozen exceptions, were ones with access to water- 
borne transportation, whether ocean, lake, or river. 

Gov. Luther H. Hodges and Mrs. Hodges made 
reservations for one of the trips to Bermuda. It im- 
mediately became known as "The Governor's Cruise" 
and a scramble for tickets ensued. The North Carolina 
Automotive Wholesalers Association booked passage 
for its membership in order to hold its seasonal conven- 
tion aboard, with the Governor giving the principal 
address. 

The Governor-General of Bermuda accorded honors 
to the North Carolina chief executive, and everything 
worked out fine except the weather. Because of a 
storm at sea, the Stockholm remained in its Bermuda 



harbor to let the high winds pass, and passengers re- 
turned to the State Docks somewhat behind schedule. 
But the ship reloaded and sailed on the final cruise of 
the series later the same day as called for in the original 
plans. 



Enthusiastic supporters 
of the cruise sailings are 
Wilmington's Mayor Dan 
D. Cameron and Oscar 
Breece of Fayetteville, 
shown left to right at 
Stockholm's gangway, as 
visitors leave ship just 
before its departure. 



Goodbyes to many well- 
wishers are said by Gov. 
and Mrs. Hodges as they 
start up the gangway. 




Uolcnel lYiaVis Statement 



at 






State ? ort5 *W r 
+ Yi Carol^ I. positive s tate. 



^tory 



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^ 4- v,ro 






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port- 



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bei^S e f 7 er ed at ^° tVv State r &nd 1> 



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be £ aT , endless / t and ^ an ds *™ increase 

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contract ^ ^ 



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be 



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the 



1 
end 



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:. Pod 




IV'dmiHctoit 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It is cap- 
able of berthing three 500-foot vessels simultaneous- 
ly, with depth of 32 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 
square feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry, with sprinkler and deluge- systems. 

OPEN STORAGE: Three acres of paved open storage, 
easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron; also depressed tracks at 
rear of transit sheds and warehouse, entire length. 
Storage yard on property for 240 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two Diesel switching loco- 
motives. 

One 35-ton locomotive crane and one 25-ton loco- 
motive crane. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of va- 
rious sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. 

Light and heavy tractors and trailers and straddle 
trucks. Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck docks 
for loading and unloading at the transit sheds and 
warehouse; ramps for easy access into sheds and 
warehouse; portable side and end loading ramps for 
rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumiga- 
tion plant with two chambers of 7,225 cubic feet 
each; equipped for HCN and methyl bromide. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally-ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. 

Export crating service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Sea- 
board Air Line Railroad Companies and numerous 
highway motor transportation companies. 

Office space available for freight forwarders, steam- 
ship agents, and other commercial personnel. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



16 




TrLcielteab Cc'fu 

J. D. HOLT, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is cap- 
able of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one 
petroleum tanker, with a depth of 30 feet at mean 
low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60,000 square 
feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinklers. 

One transit shed, 32,000 square feet, constructed 
of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 

A third transit shed, the newest, is of pre-fabricated 
steel construction with sprinklers and has capacity 
of 40,000 square feet. 

WAREHOUSES: Two storage warehouses, totaling 
88,000 square feet, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: A large open storage area is avail- 
able. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. At- 
lantic and East Carolina Railway freight car stor- 
age yard adjacent to Port property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cot- 
ton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletiza- 
tion of cargoes. 

Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Equipment for the loading of 
grain in ships or barges available. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easy access into transit sheds and 
warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Tobacco Fumigation Plant planned 
and expected to start operation in late summer. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. 

Served by Atlantic and East Carolina Railway Co. 

One interstate truck line on property, and served bv 
numerous highway motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



17 



COTTON SAMPLING . . . 

(Continued from Page 4) 

The assistance given by the Robertson organization 
was of incalculable value, and Robertson again set the 
pattern for this special service. 

The State Ports, as it always expects to do when- 
ever it finds that the need has arisen to perform any 
particular service in the best way, sought expert guid- 
ance and received it. 

There is no question that the policy has paid off. 
Following subsequent shipments of India and Egyptian 
cotton, letters which were unsolicited and unexpected 
have come from the cotton trade saying many pleasant 
things. Their theme is this: "Never have we received 
more excellent treatment from sampling through ship- 
ment; so we will use the State Docks at Wilmington 
whenever possible." 



TOBACCO AT MOREHEAD . . . 

(Continued from Page 8) 

The Morehead City Terminals are backed by a 
broad area of rich tobacco lands and are consequently 
making a strong bid for tobacco cargoes. 

In catering to the tobacco trade, the Terminals re- 
cently began a tobacco warehousing service when 
space for 10,000 hogsheads became available. More 
space will be made available this year, and the State 
installation will be able to store some 40,000 hogs- 
heads, it is expected. 

Another service which will be added, in order to at- 
tract tobacco shipments, is fumigation. Plans for a 
fumigation plant have been drawn up and the contracts 
will be let this spring, according to latest information. 



Isthmian Steamship Company 

71 Broadway New York 6. N. Y. 

India, Pakistan, Ceylon 
Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq 
Thailand, Burma 
Hawaiian Islands 

Malaya, Philippines, Hong Kong 
Indonesia, Indo-China, Viet Nam 
Alexandria, Lebanon, Red Sea 
North Atlantic & Gulf Intercoastal 



Wilmington Agents 

C. D. Maffitt Company 



Tel. Wilmington 6824 



The 1955 tobacco movement saw tobacco exported 
principally to Germany. However, a long-sought be- 
ginning of tobacco export to Holland began late last 
year, with a shipment to Rotterdam. 



MAIDENS . . . 

(Continued from Page 9) 

about maiden voyages: He, Capt. E. Valentine Wenk, 
had commanded four other ships on their maiden voy- 
ages. The fifth was getting to be routine. 

At Wilmington's State Docks, the Danish ship Rita 
Maersk called on its first trip to load powdered milk for 
the Far East. 

This sleek new vessel of the famous Maersk Line 
was beginning a run between the Atlantic coastal 
ports and the Orient and might never return to its 
native Copenhagen. At least there are no plans that 
it do so. After two years, officers and sailors go home 
on leave, but the ship remains on its run. 

The Rita is built for speed and cruises at 19 knots. 
Its power plant is of the most modern design with a 
diesel and diesel exhaust turbine construction. 




AMERICAN HARDWARE 
& EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALERS 
HARDWARE, AGRICULTURAL 
IMPLEMENTS AND BUILDING 
SUPPLIES • SERVING THE 
CAROLINAS SINCE 1913 • 



Charlotte, N. C. • Wilmington, N. C. • Greenville, S. C. 
Home Office: Charlotte, N. C. 



Complete Banking Services . 

Serving .... 

Eastern North Carolina For 
Over Half A Century .... 

We offer you Import and Export Letters of 
Credit . . . 

Foreign Exchange, Draft or Cable . . . 

Travelers Cheques and Letters of Credit. 



Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

Member Federal Reserve System 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

TELEPHONES 6-4652 & 6-3248 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 



Peter B. Ruffin 

President 

W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 



William T. Davies 

Manager 



W. D. Williams 

Secretary 

J. P. Wilson 

Treasurer 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder Registration No. 376 



HEIDE AND CO., INC 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



FORWARDING AGENTS 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 
STEVEDORES 



vOY 0'S AGE^ 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Cable Address 

"HEIDE" WILMINGTON-CAROLINA 

Telephone 3-5161 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 223 



READY TO SERVE . . . 

Your Port Of Wilmington Needs 

In every phase of the agricultural and 
industrial development of North Caro- 
lina, this bank has been an important 
factor. 

It has consistently cooperated with the 
grower, the manufacturer, the shipper 
and the merchant, helping to make 
North Carolina the prosperous, progres- 
sive State that it is. 

THE 

WILMINGTON SAVINGS AND 

TRUST COMPANY 

"NORTH CAROLINA'S PORT BANK" 

COMMERCIAL • TRUST • SAVINGS 

Established 1888 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Member Federal Reserve System 



19 



POSTMASTER: If not delivered in 10 days, re- 
turn to Box 1619. State Ports Authority. 
Wilmington, N. C. Return Postage Guaranteed. 



Sec. 34.66. P. L. & R. 


U. S. Postage 


PAID 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Permit No. 225 



RALEIGH* H.C. 






SHIP LAUNDRY 


One Day Service 

• 


IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 


CLEANERS, INC. 


FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE 6651 


WILMINGTON. N. C. 


"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



CUMMINS 




Cummins Diesel 
Sales Corporation 

P. O. Box 1586 N. Main St. Extension 

HIGH POINT. N. C. 

JOHN FAUNCE. Mgr. Telephone 2-4136 



GREENHEART 

Piling. Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of 

Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and Bridges and 

Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK, N. Y. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE — WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 

GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and to 

abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, dolphins, 

rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State docks 
at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 



PROVISIONS. DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative oi 

Columbia Rope 

International Paint 

Socony- Vacuum Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington. N. C. 

Telephone 4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



»■/' 



O oC ' 




SPRING 
1956 



NortK Carolina State Libc»< ; 
Raleigh 




north 
Carolina 



German ireighters continue to call lor tobacco 
at State Terminals. Morehead City. N. C. 




Wilmington 



HI I 

Ill 1ILJ11 



morehead city 



HEIDE & CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 



p ytfS AGe^ c ^ 



Cable Address 

'HEIDE" MOREHEADCITY-CAROLINA 

P. O. Box 322 

Telephone 6-3652 

R. L. HICKS, Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 




PETER B. RUFFIN, President W. P. EMERSON, Vice-Presidenl 

W. D. WILLIAMS, Secretary f. P. WILSON, Treasurer 

Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 1809 
Telephone 2-3381 



Cable Address 
WILSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT 

INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



PAVING CONTRACTORS 

ANY SIZE JOB ANYWHERE 

E. B. TOWLES 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

DIAL 2-0359 
Market Street Road 





ASPHALT 

CONCRETE 

AND 

BITUMINOUS 

SURFACE 
TREATMENT 




General Offices 
P. 0. Box 1619, Wilmington 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

EDWIN PATE, Chairman 

RAYMOND A. BRYAN 
Vice-Chairman 

W. AVERY THOMPSON 
Secretary-Treasurer 

J. HARRY WHITE, Member 

HARVEY W. MOORE, Member 

HAROLD F. COFFEY, Member 

HENRY A. LINEBERGER 
Member 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

RICHARD S. MARR 

TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT 

STEPHEN S. KOSZEWSKI 
Director of Commerce 

E. E. LEE, JR.. Traffic Manager 

ACCOUNTING DEPT. 

R. A. DeVANE 
A ssistant Treasurer 

WILMINGTON OFFICE 

N. C. State Docks 

V. (). Box 1619— Telephone 3-1022 
TWX: WM 77 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN 
Operations Manager 

MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

.V. ('. Ocean Terminals 

P. 0. Box 145 — Telephone 6-3159 
TWX: Morehcad City, N. C. 8782 

■1 . I'. HOLT, Operations Manager 

\\ ALTER II. FRIEDERICHS 
Assistant 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

39 Broadway, Wing- 618 
New York (>, N. Y. 

Bowling- Green 9-8389 
TWX: NY 1-1111 

WILLIAM S. CHILDRESS 
New York Representative 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N ( . S. I*. A. 



Spring, L956 



Vol. i -.H. II. No. 1 



Bryan Caldwell, E<iit<>, 



SELL VOIR STATE PORTS 



This magazine is intended to be read by at least ten people. Pleat < pa 
it on when you are through. 



(contents 



Collapsible Cases Replace Familiar Tobacco Hogshead 4 
Azalea Festival Crowds Pay Visit to State Docks 

Marine Battalion Sails 6, 7 

Schoolchildren Watch Shipping 8 

Grain is Stored at State Terminals > 

Surplus Tobacco Loads for Korea 

Deepening Cape Fear 10, 11 

Frequent Tobacco Cargoes Load at Ocean Terminals 12. 13 

New Construction at Morehead Terminals 14 

Colonel Marr's Statement 15 

Port Facilities, Wilmington 1''. 

Port Facilities, Morehead Citv 17 



COVER 

Hamburg-America Line's MS Tubingen has called tw 
cently at X. C. Ocean Terminals. Hapag and North German 
Lloyd (tie sending vessels often ami with increasing 
larity to load tobacco here. St, pages twelvi and thirteen. 

(PHOTO BY SCHUMACHERl 



V 






71 

V 


ri 


V 

5 ^ it. i 



(sollabsible Uases Replace Familiar Tobacco Hogshead 



The familiar hogshead of tobacco will prob- 
ably be with us for years to come, but a new 
form of packaging which has many promising 
features has appeared and the State Ports 
handled their first shipment of leaf in the 
new shape. 

The shipment was made via the British 
freighter SS Torr Head. Its master, Capt. S. 
J. Stark, who entertained at luncheon while 
in port, is shown in photo at right with his 
guests, representatives of Gallaher and Gen- 
eral Box and Docks Manager P. L. Sullivan. 

Below left is Etheridge Powers of Durham, 
representing General Box, with one of the new 
cases closed. 

Below right are William Carter and M. G. 
Hardy of Goldsboro, representing Gallaher, 
with open case. 

(Continued on Page Eighteen) 




Gzalea 'festival Crowds 
Pay Visit to State Docks 

Wilmington's Azalea Festival activities lapped over to some 
extent onto the N. C. State Docks. 

Two visiting- Navy destroyers tied up here and held open 
house during the festival weekend. The State Docks consequently 
were thrown open to visitors, and many made a tour of the 
property after inspecting the naval vessels. 

While the ships tied up abreast their crews were welcomed 
by the enormous uniformed band from New Hanover Junior 
High, playing- a program of march music as a dozen majorettes 
danced and twirled and swung their batons. 

Record-breaking crowds of festival visitors poured on 
board the vessels during the hours they were open for inspection. 
Two gangways became necessary to handle the traffic, which 
one naval officer estimated at 3,000 visitors for one afternoon 
and almost that many the next. 

Another Festival activity that took place at the Docks was 
the construction of parade floats on the property. The location 
of this effort changed from place to place as loading operations 
called for commodities to move between the transit sheds and 
warehouse. But by shifting around to accommodate the move- 
ment of cargoes, the parade officials were able to assemble a 
half-dozen here. 



'if 'if 'if if if 




MUSICAL WELCOME— The USS New and the USS Holder tied up at the 
State Docks during Wilmington's Azalea Festival to hold open house. 
The welcome was brassy and musical, and creating much interest were 
the uniformed majorettes who danced to march tunes played by a 
school band. 





•if if if 'if if 



RECORD-BREAKING CROWDS — The public turned out to inspect 
the Navy's destroyers during visiting hours. An estimated 3,000 
boarded the ships the first day they were open and caused such 
a traffic jam that a second gangway was found necessary to 
accommodate the stream of interested visitors. Below are shown 
some of the parade floats that were assembled at the State Docks. 
When this photo was made these were not completed and one 
was not yet proofread. 




MARINE BATTALION SAILS 

Itom <gtate letminaU ft* MEDITERRANEAN 



Sr -^%£^ 




COMPLETELY EQUIPPED — The reinforced battalion loaded everything it would need, 
as a Marine spokesman put it, "from bolts to nuts." Using a large part of the 
Terminals' open storage space as their staging area. Marines poured in equipment. 
With the arrival oi the first naval vessel, loading started and continued through the 
night. It was a co-operative effort: Marines worked on the docks while sailors man- 
ned the winches and performed the lifts. In less than two days it was all over. 
At right, the USS Rockbridge noses out into the channel, with the Monrovia to follow 
in a matter of minutes. 






Aom 



Retain l> 

C A 



R I B B E AN 




FULL BATTLE DRESS — Personnel 
numbering about 1.800 comprised the 
battalion of battle-equipped Marines 
who boarded at the North Carolina 
Ocean Terminals at Morehead City. 
Buses and "cattle cars" (shown 
above) brought the leathernecks 
from Camp Lejeune and they march- 
ed on board the Navy transports to 
the accompaniment of marital music 
played by a military band. Although 
the Mediterranean area seethed 
with unrest, the Marines seemed less 
grim than happy to be heading to- 
ward the playgrounds of the Inter- 
national Set. although at best they 
face a program of practice amphibi- 
ous landings and maneuvers with 
the U. S. Navy's Sixth Fleet, with 
little time scheduled for idling on 
fabulous beaches and in gaudy ca- 
sinos. 



4> 



AND WELCOME BACK— Sun-bronz- 
ed Marines by the thousands and 
their equipment returned from war 
games in Puerto Rico when Navy 
troop ships tied up at the State Ter- 
minals. At right is shown a cargo 
net of duffel bags coming off the USS 
Chilton. 




School Children 
Watch Shipping 

Frequently groups of pupils from North Caro- 
lina schools visit the State Ports facilities to 
watch the movement of cargoes and learn about 
deep water transportation. 

Such groups are made welcome at each State 
installation and are given every opportunity to 
see the activity. Occasionally, when stevedoring 
stops at lunchtime and there is no danger to them, 
they will be permitted up close to the visiting 
freighters and sometimes on board. 

At top is shown a school group from Kenans- 
ville on the bridge of the Borgholt, with the chief 
mate answering questions about his ship. 

The school children at right are from Stone- 
wall and are inspecting the machinery used to load 
a scrap ship, while the noon break is going on. 




Grain Goes into Storage at State Terminals 




VACUUM SWEEPER empties truck load of oats grown in Carolinas. 



Oats grown in the Carolinas has been moved 
by the truckload into a warehouse of the Ocean 
Terminals, which is leased by Cargill, Inc., na- 
tionally-known grain brokers. 

The grain has been ticketed as government 
surplus and is expected to remain on hand until 
sold abroad, when it will move overseas on gov- 
ernment contract. 

Trailer-trucks — sometimes as many as 30 a 
day — brought the oats, which was moved by va- 
cuum equipment from the carrier into the ware- 
house. The operation continued for some three 
weeks. 

When the grain is shipped it will be the first 
such movement here in over a year. 

The State Ports Authority is well aware of the 
value of surplus (CCC) commodity movements. 
Such traffic is bringing a growing number of 
ships to the State Docks in Wilmington, and the 
Ocean Terminals at Morehead City has partici- 
pated in this traffic to some extent. 



North Carolina State Library 



£"*/>' 



US 



Raleigh 

tobacco 



South Korea was the destination for two shipments 
of tobacco through the State Docks, a movement that 
solidified after long negotiation and one that resulted 
in calls by two freighters of the Iverans Lines. 

A total of some 3,000 hogsheads were loaded on 
the ships that called about 10 days apart. The leaf 
required fumigation, and since truckloads of the kegs 
began arriving only a few days before the first ship- 
ment, fumigation facilities worked around the clock. 

The MV Ivaran, on its maiden voyage, picked up 
the first part of the Korean shipment. The remainder 
went on board the Borgholt, which was visited during 
its call here by a group of schoolchildren. (See oppo- 
site page.) 

The tobacco moved as a government surplus com- 
modity. 

The ports of Norfolk and Charleston participated in 
this movement to a lesser extent, one partial load going 
through each. 



CALLS BY TWO VESSELS — More than half the surplus tobacco being 
shipped to Korea moved through the State Docks at Wilmington and 
required calls by two vessels. The first to pick up some of these 
hogsheads was the MV Ivaran, on its maiden voyage (top). The re- 
mainder oi the 3.000 hogsheads was loaded some 10 days later on the 
Borgholt. It was a busy day for the State Docks when the Borgholt put 
in. It occupied the third berth and gave the installation a full house. 
(Photo below by Calhoun.) 



Loads for Korea 




V 



■ - \?,J 




B °»G H 





S **■ !l ' X- 



* 4 ttrr 

ikffi id 

- 




CORPS OF ENGINEERS 



U.S. ARMY 



*RIGHT3VILLE 
BEACH r 




42 



Slight HOUSE 
CAPE FEAR 



WILMINGTON HARBOR, N.C. 



SCALE OF MILES 
I 2 3 



CORPS OF ENGINEERS 



MAP REVISED JUNE 1955 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 



Work On Deepening 

Uabe feai Ultavinei 

Ready to Commence 

Wilmington Harbor's six-year-old channel improvement proj- 
ect is scheduled to get underway shortly, according to plans re- 
pealed by Col. R. L. Hill, District Engineer of the Wilmington 
District, Corps of Engineers. 

Plans call for the existing channel, 32 feet deep and 400 feet 
wide, to be deepened to 34 feet without any change in the width, 
[n the bar channel immediately south of Raldhead Island the 
iepth will be 35 feet. 

Work on the bar was completed in April by the Government 
lopper dredge Gerig. Remainder of the dredging will be by con- 
tact, it is presently planned. 

The project was approved in 1950 but funds have been with- 
held because of more pressing military requirements. 

The job involves some 6,000,000 cubic yards of soil and stone 
;o be deposited in diked areas in some instances and along the 
listant shore in others. The contractor, specifications say, must 
lome up with a minimum of 400,000 cubic yards a month. 

Shipping interests say the improved waterway will offer 
special advantages to petroleum carriers whose larger ships will 
)e able to navigate the channel under full load at mean low water. 

The additional depth will be a welcome safety measure to 
Yeighter captains. 

The appropriation has powerful Federal backing and is clear- 
ng through Congress rapidly. The work on the river channel 
seems ready to start almost any week now. 




EARLY EXAMPLE — The Cape Fear is an early version ol hopper 
iredges. In background are gas plant smokestacks in Wilmington. 
Date of picture is unknown but place, despite debris, is Engineer Yard. 
Pi. converted freighter, she was fitted out about 1895 and was among 
he first to effect improvements on the Wilmington Harbor bar channel 
off Baldhead Island. She had a capacity ol 300 cubic yards. 

,EHIGH — Dredge Lehigh is shown below at work on 30-foot channel 

jroject at Morehead City. Picture was made in 1936. Any day now 

his scene will be duplicated many times over as powerful dredges 

begin Wilmington Harbor 34-foot project. 





HOPPER DREDGE GERIG— The Gerig. shown in Cape Fear River a 1 

Wilmington, is 351 feet long, draws 21.4 feet light and 24.4 -loaded, has 

3,000 cu. yd. capacity, crew of 70 and is turbo-electric powered. The 

master is Caot. Jarvis S. Midgett, native of Hatteras. N. C. 

ARM DESCENDING — First phase of increasing depth of Wilmington Har 

bor from 32 to 34 feet began with hopper dredging in the bar channel 

below Southport with the Corps of Engineers Dredge Gerig. above. 

lowering dragarm preparatory to loading activities. 

THE CHIEF — Lieut. Gen. Samuel D. Sturgis. Jr.. Chief of Engineers, U. S. 

Army, Major General at the time, goes over District activities with 

Colonel Hill (right) in office during recent visit. 





\fr vt> vfr 



Frequent Tobacco Cargoes 
Load At Ocean Terminals 




Tobacco is proving the most important dry commercial 
commodity being handled at the State Terminals, Morehead 
City, and sleek, new German freighters are arriving often 
to pick up a load of the leaf. 

Both Hamburg-America and North German Lloyd are 
sending vessels here for this cargo, eight such calls having 
been made this year. 



MSs BREITENSTEIN and Moselstein are examples of the trim new 
vessels that North German Lloyd is sending to pick up tobacco. The 
cover photo shows one of the sleek Hamburg-America freighters. 
These fast ships take a dozen passengers and call at Dutch and 
German ports. 



Last year, tobacco cargoes numbered 10, and this was 
record-breaking for the young North Carolina state port. 
But the figure will likely be bettered in 1956. Tobacco ship- 
ments have always increased in tobacco season, which comes 
in late summer. Also, the State Terminals have allotted more 
space for tobacco storage than previously and consequently 
is storing more hogsheads. Experience shows that having a 
quantity of tobacco on hand tends to increase the size of 
shipments. 

The tobacco fumigation chamber which is now under con- 
struction will be finished during the coming tobacco season 
and is expected to prove a great attraction for additional 
tobacco shipments. 

In general, the leaf passing through these facilities has 
been North Carolina flue-cured, but some of its has been 
Kentucky burley. The German freighters have discharged the 
bulk of their loads at German ports, either Hamburg or Bre- 
men, but the beginning of a movement to Holland has been 
seen here and hailed as an encouraging note. 

Also encouraging is the movement of smaller shipments 
of diversified commodities through the State Terminals, ship- 
ments that follow along when the ship has been attracted in 
for tobacco. Recent ships here have also taken on fish oil, 
oranges, and frozen poultry — in quantities too small, no doubt, 
to attract a call but nevertheless providing a heartening sign 
of growth. 




WHEN THE GOTTINGEN called at State Terminals, officials of the 
U. S. Navigation Co. and Hapag's traffic department came along to 
inspect the installation. Left to right are Peter B. Ruffin, president 
of Morehead City Shipping Co., local agent; H. M. Lampe. general 
manager of U. S. Navigation, general agent; Capt. Richard Cammann. 
master; Albert Berg, representing Hamburg-America traffic depart- 
ment; and J. D. Holt, SPA's Terminals manager. 




SOME OF THE SKIPPERS— Shown in their ships are Capt. H. Wechtel 
of the Breitenstein and Capt. Hermann Jacobs of the Erlangen, both 
masters with many years service in the German Merchant Marine. 
To Capt. Jacobs it seems like only yesterday that his freighter was 
torpedoed and sunk off Spain during World War II. 



SOME OF THE VISITORS— When W. O. Smith & Co. is named freight 
forwarder for a shipment through the State installation, its Vice 
President Herbert A. Byrne of New York is almost always on hand 
to supervise the movement. He is shown at left when the Moselstein 
called. At right is John C. Broderick. editor and publisher of the 
magazine The Mariner. He visited the facilities to watch the 
Gottingen load. 



A COUPLE OF 'HOGS' MOVE ON BOARD— The camera catches two 
hogsheads of tobacco rising from the docks moving over the hatch 
and down into the hold. Stevedoring is done by Morehead City Ship- 
ping Co. The German sailor (right) is typical of the teen-age appren- 



tice seamen the German lines are training on board their vessel:; to 

supply much-needed manpower. Some freighters carry as many as 

20 trainees, and this one. like many youths everywhere, is fascinated 

by a camera. 





UNDERPINNINGS PLACED— The fumigation plant which will be con- 
structed at the N. C. Ocean Terminals will rest on the pilings (shown 
above) that have been driven deep in the site. First part to be com- 
pleted will be the machinery room, and the chamber will arrive 
later for assembly. 



New Construction 
at Morehead Terminals 

Two new facilities at the N. C. Ocean Terminals, More- 
head City, are expected to go into operation shortly. They 
are the tobacco fumigation plant and the new transit shed. 

The transit shed, now almost ready, provides 40,000 square 
feet of additional space. It is the third shed at this installa- 
tion. 

The installation of the sprinkler system is now in pro- 
gress and the system will undergo various checks and tests 
before occupancy. 

The fumigation plant is being manufactured in the main 
off the property. Visible now are the skeleton of machinery 
room and the underpinnings for the gas chamber. 

The chamber will arrive in sections which will be fitted 
together in a quick operation. The fumigation facility is a 
single chamber unit, but oversize machinery capable of op- 
erating two chambers is being installed. This will allow the 
addition of a second chamber, when demand makes it neces- 
sary, without having to replace pumps and other mechanisms. 

Indications are that the transit shed will be put to use in 
midsummer, while the operation of the fumigation plant is 
scheduled to begin in August. 




SHED GOING UP — Erection of the Terminals' new transit shed, which 
is of pre-fab construction, has continued over the last few months. 
The building is now almost completed, only the checking and testing 



of the sprinkler system still to go. Above photos show steps in its 
assembly, which went ahead rapidly. 



Linoleum is New Cargo at Docks 



The recent arrival at State Docks, Wilmington, of hand- 
made linoleum from Holland was the first time this com- 
modity has been imported through the State facilities. 

Distributors, Inc., of Charlotte brought in the cargo via 
the South Atlantic freighter Southport and the operation 
proved such a success similar cargoes are continuing to 
arrive. 

For the first movement Distributors' official Al E. Money- 
han was on hand to watch the operation, along with several 



of his customers who will distribute the product through 
their North Carolina stores. 

Photos below show the unloading and the inspection. Mr. 
Moneyhan, the importer, is seen left with Mr. J. W. Smith, 
department head of Wilmington's Belk-Berry store. 

The importing firm is using the State Docks as distribution 
point for supplying their customers for this commodity 
throughout the state. 




lone 



I DlaVi s Statement 



HE STATE PORTS have reached a stage of development five years ahead of original ex- 
pectations. 

SPA Chairman Pate revealed this when he heard our recent report that both State instal- 
lations operated at a profit for the first time during the past fiscal year. 

He recalled he was serving in the State Legislature some years ago when the bill to cre- 
ate the North Carolina State Ports Authority was presented. "We believed," he said, "it 
would take eight to 10 years for the State Ports to start operating in the black. Now, we 
see, it has been done in four years." 

Channel deepening at both ports will prove beneficial. The Cape Fear project is now 
under way, and the Morehead-Beaufort deepening and widening project has won approval by 
Congress. In a measure this shows national recognition of SPA achievements and thus is 
something of a tribute to our growth. 

Growth has taken place at our facilities to such an extent they are somewhat hard press- 
ed. We have turned down thousands of hogsheads of tobacco at Morehead City because we 
lack space. We have turned away ships and thousands of tons of cargo, including much to- 
bacco, at Wilmington because we lack space. We have reached the point at both ports where 
care must be exercised in order to retain the flexibility of our facilities. 

Reflecting this is the increase of 400 percent in the value of cargo handled through our 
installations in the past year. 

To meet the demands of growing business we must have additional equipment. Out of 
our own funds we have spent a half-million dollars and added a gantry crane at the State 
Docks and a transit shed and fumigation chamber at the Terminals. It takes a considerable 
period of time to accumulate cash for expanding in this manner. And such expansion is slow 
at a time when demands on us are quickening. 

Consequently, we have requested funds of the State Budget Bureau. The sum is $4.3 
million and would go for permanent improvements. For the Docks at Wilmington, the follow- 
ing: a 1,100 ft. extension of the wharf for berthing two more ships, an additional transit shed, 
additional warehousing space of 162,500 sq. ft., and a second gantry crane. For the Terminals, 
Morehead City: construction of warehouses adding 200,000 sq. ft. 

With these facilities we can immensely increase our services to the state. 




Wdminaton 



N. C. STATE DOCKS 
PHILIP L. SULLIVAN, Operations Manager 



WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. 
It is capable of berthing three 500-ft. vessels 
simultaneously, with depth of 32 feet at mean 
low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS : Two transit sheds of 79,000 
square feet each, constructed of steel, concrete 
and masonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE : One storage warehouse of 86,- 
100 square feet, constructed of steel, concrete 
and masonry, with sprinkler and deluge sys- 
tems. 

OPEN STORAGE : Three acres of paved open 
storage, easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES : One complete weighing station, hand- 
ling both trucks and rail cars. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with 
crossovers, full length of wharf apron; also 
depressed tracks at rear of transit sheds and 
warehouse, entire length. Storage yard on 
property for 240 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two Diesel switching 
locomotives. 

One 35-ton locomotive crane and one 25-ton 
locomotive crane. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT : Fork lifts 
of various sizes with accessories such as cotton 
clamps, etc. Light and heavy tractors and 
trailers and straddle trucks. 

Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at the transit 
sheds and warehouse ; ramps for easy access 
into sheds and warehouse; portable side and 
end loading ramps for rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fu- 
migation plant with two chambers of 7,225 cu- 
bic feet each; equipped for HCN and methyl 
bromide. 

SERVICES : Telephone, electricity and Federal- 
ly approved potable water supply at shipside. 
Export crating service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and 
Seaboard Air Line Railroad Companies and 
numerous highway motor transportation com- 
panies. 

Office space available for freight forwarders, 
steamship agents, and other commercial person- 
nel. 

SECURITY : Security force on duty at all times. 



j*VXr- 



*A' 



ffiicMieS 







lYloKekeab City 

N. C. OCEAN TERMINALS 
J. D. HOLT, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. 
It is capable of berthing four 500-foot cargo 
ships and one petroleum tanker, with a deptli 
of 30 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS : One transit shed of 60,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry with sprinklers. 

One transit shed, 32,000 square feet, construct- 
ed of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 

A third transit shed, the newest, is of pre-fab- 
ricated steel construction with sprinklers and 
has capacity of 40,000 square feet. 

WAREHOUSES: Two storage warehouses, to- 
taling 88,000 square feet, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: A large open storage area 
is available. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks wit] 
crossover, full length of wharf. Single depress- 
ed track full length of rear of transit sheds 
and warehouses. Atlantic and East Carolina 
Railway freight car storage yard adjacent to 
Port property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT : Fork lifts 

with detachable accessories such as barrel 

clamps, cotton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities 
for full palletization of cargoes. 

Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Equipment for the loading 
of grain in ships or barges available. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks 
for loading and unloading at transit sheds and 
warehouses; ramps for easy access into transit 
sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Chamber being installed 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federal- 
ly-approved potable water supply at shipside 
Served by Atlantic and East Carolina Kail- 
way Co. One interstate truck line on property, 
and served by numerous highway motor trans- 
portation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



IT CAN HAPPEN HERE 
(And Maybe It's About To) 

Excerpts from The Port Manager's Page, 
The Houston Port Book 

Warren D. Lamport writing' in The Houston (Tex.) Port 
Book says in part: 

The greatest centers of population and industry are concen- 
trated in areas which have water transportation facilities avail- 
able. Evidence is world-wide, with few exceptions. 

Many industries have located in Harris County because 
of the availability of water transportation facilities. No com- 
plete record is obtainable. However, the industrial plants which 
are located on either bank of the Channel (for) a distance of 
24 miles have a valuation exceeding one billion dollars, em- 
ployed 31,000 people last year, with an annual payroll estimated 
at $155 million. 

Thus income of those dependent for their livelihood upon 
the activities of the Ship Channel, expenditures which take 
place in handling tonnages, expenditures for ships' husbandry, 
and payroll of industries which have sought locations here pri- 
marily because of the availability of water transportation fa- 
cilities are important factors in determining the economic 
meaning of the Port of Houston . . . The sum total of these 
factors produced in 1954 an amount in excess of $340 million . . . 

This vast sum is purchasing power — purchasing power 
. . . which would not exist had not someone had the courage 
and the vision to provide facilities for water transportation. 



Collapsible Cases Replace 
Familiar Tobacco Hogshead 

(Continued from Page Four) 

Gallaher, Ltd., moved several thousand cases through the 
N. C. State Docks at Wilmington to be discharged in nor-thern 
England and Ireland. Gallaher is a widely-known British firm 
of tobacco importers and manufacturers. 

A case contains some 500 pounds of tobacco and is solidly 
constructed of plywood and hinged. This permits the case to fold 
flat when its contents are removed. Thus it can be used again 
and again, occupying a minimum of space on its return trip. 
Its manufacturer, General Box, estimates it is good for at 
least eight shipments before wearing out. 



ISTHMIAN LINES. Inc. 

71 Broadway New York 6, N. Y. 

India, Pakistan, Ceylon 
Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq 
Thailand, Burma 
Hawaiian Islands 
Malaya, Philippines 

Indonesia, Cambodia, Laos, Viet Nam 
Alexandria, Lebanon, Red Sea 
Near and Middle East 

Wilmington Agents 

Wilmington Shipping Co. Tei. Wilmington 2 -338 1 




The Stamp of Approval 
is on 

MCLEAN SERVICE! 



M-LEAN 

v v. W\> ' 



^W 



General Offices • Winston-Salem, N. C. 



•WE PULL FOR INDUSTRY 



TERMINALS IN 11 STATES 



EQUIPPED 

CONNECTICUT 

Bridgeport 

Hartford 

Norwich 

GEORGIA 

Atlanta 
Augusta 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 

Springfield 

Worcester 

NEW JERSEY 

Hawthorne 
Jersey City 
New Brunswick 

NEW YORK 

Albany 

Brooklyn 

New York City 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Asheville 
Burlington 



TO SERVE YOU 

Charlotte 

Durham 

Fayetteville 

Greensboro 

Hickory 

Kinston 

Rocky Mount 

Salisbury 

Shelby 

Winston-Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Philadelphia 
RHODE ISLAND 

Providence 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Anderson 

Charleston 

Columbia 

Greenville 

Hartsville 

Spartanburg 

VIRGINIA 

Danville 

Lynchburg 

Richmond 




SOUTH ATLANTIC LINE 

Regular Service Between North Carolina Ports and 

Ireland 

United Kingdom 
and North 
Continental 
Europe 

Wilmington Aqent 

Wilmington 
Shipping Co. 

Wilmington 2-3381 

AMERICAN PIONEER LINE 

South Atlantic Ports Direct to 

Honolulu - Yokohama - Manila - Keelung - Kobe 
and other Far East Ports 

Will Call at Baltic and Scandinavian Ports 
When Sufficient Cargo Is Offered. 

UNITED STATES LINES CO. 

Wilmington Agents: Heide & Co. 

Charleston Agents: Carolina Shipping Co. 

New York 4. N. Y. DIgby 4-5800 



HEIDE & CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



FORWARDING AGENTS 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 
STEVEDORES 



pVtfS AGET/v^ 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Cable Address 

"HEIDE" WILMINGTON-CAROLINA 
Telephone 3-5161 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 223 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

TELEPHONES 6-4652 & 6-3248 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 



Peter B. Ruifin 

President 



W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 



William T. Davies 

Manager 



W. D. Williams 

Secretary 



J. P. Wilson 

Treasurer 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder Registration No. 376 



READY TO SERVE . . . 
Your Port Of Wilmington Needs 

In every phase of the agricultural and 
industrial development of North Caro- 
lina, this bank has been an important 
factor. 

It has consistently cooperated with the 
grower, the manufacturer, the shipper 
and the merchant, helping to make 
North Carolina the prosperous, progres- 
sive State that it is. 

THE 
WILMINGTON SAVINGS 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

"NORTH CAROLINA'S PORT BANK" 

COMMERCIAL • TRUST • SAVINGS 

Established 1888 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Member Federal Reserve System 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

P. O. Box 1619 

WILMINGTON. N. C. 



BULK RATE 

U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Permit No. 225 






Form 3547 Requested 



SHIP LAUNDRY 

ONE DAY SERVICE 

IDEAL LAUNDRY AND 
DRY CLEANERS, INC. 

FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE 6651 

WILMINGTON. N. C. 

"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of 

Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and Bridges and 

Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK. N. Y. 



AREA REPRESENTATIVE 



WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 



GREENHEART is hightly resistant to marine borers, to fire and to 

abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, dolphins, 

rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fende' systems are in use at the N. C. State docks 
at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 



CUMMINS 



Cummins Diesel 
Sales Corporation 



P. O. Box 1586 N. Main St. Extension 

HIGH POINT. N. C. 

JOHN FAUNCE, Mgr. Telephone 2-4136 

MARINE — AUTOMOTIVE — CONSTRUCTION — INDUSTRIAL 



PROVISIONS, 


DECK AND 


ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 


O. 


E. 


D 


uRANT 






SHIP 


CHANDLER 




Representative of 










Columbia Rope 




Wilmington, 


N. C. 


International Paint 




Telephone 


4232 


Socony-Vacuum Oil Co 


., Inc 


Wa-er & Market Sts. 



HI 






DECEMBER 




North Carofina State Library 



1956 








Arrivals from India Are Rita and Her Cats. 



north Carolina 




■J 



Wilmington 



morehead city 



DE & 



G. 



STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 



yO's age: Vc> 



Cable Address 

"HEIDE" MOREHEADCITY-CAROLINA 

P. O. Box 322 

Telephone 6-3S52 

R. L. HICKS, Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY. NORTH CAROLINA 




PETER B. RUFFIN, President W. P. EMERSON, Vice-President 

W. D. WILLIAMS, Secretary f. P. WILSON, Treasurer 

Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 1809 
Telephone 2-3381 



Cable Address 
WILSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT 

INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



PAVING CONTRACTORS 



ANY SIZE JOB ANYWHERE 



E. B. TOWLES 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

DIAL 2-0359 
Market Street Road 





ASPHALT 

CONCRETE 

AND 

BITUMINOUS 

SURFACE 
TREATMENT 




General Offices 
P. O. Box 1619, Wilmington 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 
EDWIN PATE, Chairman 

RAYMOND A. BRYAN 

V ice-Chairman 

W. AVERY THOMPSON 

Secretary-Treasurer 

J. HARRY WHITE, Member 

HARVEY W. MOORE, Member 

HAROLD F. COFFEY, Member 

HENRY A. LINEBERGER, Member 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

RICHARD S. MARR 

TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT 

E. E. LEE, JR., Traffic Manager 
and Director of Solicitations 

NEW YORK OFFICE 

39 Broadway, Wing 618 
New York 6, N. Y. 

Bowling Green 9-8389 

TWX: NY 1-4414 

WILLIAM S. CHILDRESS 

New York Representative 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

N. C. State Docks 

P. O. Box 1619— Telephone 3-1622 
TWX: WM 77 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN 

Operations Manager 

MOREHEADCITY OFFICE 

N. C. Ocean Terminah 

P. O. Box 145 Telephone 6-3159 
TWX: Morehead City, N. C. 8782 

J. D. HOLT. Operations Manager 

WALTER H. FRIEDERICHS 
Assistant 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 



December, 1956 



Volum.- II, No. II 



BRYAN CALDWELL. Editor 



SELL YOUR STATE PORTS 

This magazine is intended to be read by at least ten people. 
Please pass it on when you are through. 



(contents 



Third Stockholm Cruise 4 

Fumigation at Both Ports "> 

Families Afloat b 

Tapicoa Flour Arrives from Rio 

Grain is New Commodity 8-9 

Exotic Cargo of Wild Animals 1M-11 

Ports Statistics 

Riprap for N. C. Outer Banks 1 2 

New Service Begins 

SPA's Prettiest Visitor 

Record Tobacco Cargoes 

Colonel Marr's Statement 15 

Port Facilities, Wilmington . 16 

Port Facilities. Morehead City 



COVER 

The ilncr leopard < ubs are pai i o\ mi < \<>tn < argo o\ wild animals 
—including snakes, birds, elephants, and other jungle creatures 
■which were landed at state /')<>< ks. Their keeper u Rita Remy, 
a pretty Swiss girl who left tier job guiding tourists through the U. 
N. building m New York to help trap game in the Indian jungles. 

Star-News Photo > 



gPG facilities Used for THIRD CRUISE SEASON 

For the third season o[ Tar Heel cruises, the MV cruises was last year's trip to Bermuda with the Tar Heel 
Stockholm called at a Ports Authority installation, this governor on board. Gov. and Mrs. Luther H. Hodges are shown 
time the N. C. State Docks at Wilmington. Directly in photo below as they mounted the gangway on this occasion. 
out of drydock and alter test runs in New York harbor, ,_____ B __ M __ m ____ mi _______ i __^^ 

the ship arrived displaying its new million-dollar bow 
replacing the one crushed in the tragic collision with 
the Andrea Doria. 

The Stockholm's arrival for the most recent cruise 
series is shown in bottom photo. The newly installed 
bow begins roughly where the letter K appears in the 
name Stockholm, for the original one had been smash- 
ed back almost that far. 

Remaining shots show the Stockholm on previous 
visits to State facilities. At right is shown the ship call- , , 
ing at Morehead City for the 1954 cruises and, beneath, 
coming up the Cape Fear river for the 1955 season. 

Most publicized of the vessel's various Tar Heel 



ii 




UNDER CONSTRUCTION— The most up-to-date fumi- 
gation plant on the Atlantic seaboard has been built at the 
State Terminals, Morehead City. Above photos show various 
stages of construction from early foundation work to completion. 
First operation was to drive piling deep into ground to provide 
support for heavy machinery. The machine house is erected, 
and beside it is laid concrete foundation for vacuum chamber. 
The assembly and placing of vacuum chamber completes the 



series. Location was set beside warehouses and across from 

transit sheds so operation can be performed with minimum it- 
handling and consequently minimum expense. In background 
of photo series can also be seen a variety of port activities. The 
grain loader is shown in Nos. 2 and 4, while No. 3 shows crane 
loading riprap from rail cars. This went aboanl bat ■ and was 
moved to Outer Banks for storm construction. In photo No. 4 
behind grain loader can be seen tanker discharging petroleum. 



PLANT AT TERMINALS NOW IN OPERATION 



Fumigation Service Offered at Both Ports 



FINAL APPROVAL — Federal and State inspectors gather- 
ed to give the new facility exhaustive tests over a two-day 
period and the installation passed with flying colors. Represen- 
tatives of the U. S. Department of Agriculture are shown 



below. They are James N. Smith of Charleston and Herbert 
Roth of Hoboken. One of the pneumatic doors is shown rising 
and a view of the oversize pump is shown in the interior of 
the machinery room. 




fanuli 



Gfleat 



When Mrs. Noah bundled up the children 
and led them on board the Ark to go floating 
around for 40 days and 40 nights, she might have 
started something, for Mrs. Gratsos has been 
floating around with her husband for 30 years 
and has raised two husky sons . . . and she's loved 
every bit of it. 

The Gratsos family is shown upper right. 
Capt. Spyricon L. Gratsos is master of SS Theo- 
dore N. Vlassopulos, which called at the State 
Docks to load scrap metal. His wife Rita is listed 
as ship's nurse. Their two sons hire out to their 
father during summer vacation as seamen but 
in the winter go to school, Eddie to Marine En- 
gineering school in Glasgow and George in his 
native Greece. 

Capt. and Mrs. S. Saridis, central couple 
in photo at right, have sailed together through 
many years, also, and she has a companions, on 
this one voyage of the SS Zosianne, the wives of 
five other officers. The ship's chief engineer 
and wife are shown here. 





At left is Capt. Heinrich L. Willenbrock and 
his Spanish wife, on board the Seefahrer, which 
on several occasions has brought sugar from 
Cuba and taken back woodpulp. The Willen- 
brocks have two children in Buenos Aires, and 
the skipper's wife accompanies him only occa- 
sionally when she feels she can be spared at home. 
The captain is a much decorated former subma- 
rine ace of German Navy. 





ANOTHER NOTABLE FIRST' 

(Editorial reprinted from The Wilmington News) 

labioca flout tltoioes horn Ki 



Promotion and perseverance are paying off for the 
Wilmington port, as evidenced by another "first" at the 
State Ports Authority's Docks. 

Arrival of the first cargo of tapioca flour further 
illustrates the diversity of goods coming into the port, 
but even more significantly it represents the result of 
long planning and effort to induce industrial plants in 
various parts of North Carolina to use the Wilmington 
port for imports as well as exports. 





Mil ♦ • Wjk • 



The tapioca flour shipment is headed for a large 
paper manufacturing company in Western North Caro- 
lina and came through this port from an originating 
point in South America. 

We hope that Wilmington may continue to serve 
as liaison between these two points, and it is quite pos- 
sible that this first shipment may lead to a flourishing 
trade in the movement of this cargo. 

Now that the "ice has been broken" it seems reason- 
able that if all goes well with this first effort regarding 
tapioca flour the trend may spread to other state indus- 
trial and manufacturing plants that heretofore have 
not been shipping through Tar Heel ports. 

The SPA has been engaged in extensive work in seek- 
ing wider diversity of cargoes, incoming and outgoing. 
Various "firsts" have demonstrated the success of such 
efforts in recent years. Excluding stub old standbys as 
petroleum products, tobacco, and scrap metal, yester- 
day's "first" is probably the most notable from a state- 
wide standpoint. 

Such cargoes as that show the importance of Tar 1 feel 
ports to people and places at inland points who would 
customarily not connect themselves with ocean ports. 
In addition, it brings direct benefits to numerous other 
businesses and communities in the state. 



iN 





NEW COMMODITY 



Bulk Grain M 



oves 



The movement overseas of bulk grain through the State 
Terminals at Morehead City started recently and is develop- 
ing into a valuable tonnage producer. The American flag, 
which has been absent from these berths except on U. S. 
Navy vessels, is now being seen regularly on the string of 
freighters calling to pick up this commodity. 

Some 2,000 or more tons of grain - soya pellets and 
linseed expeller pellets - have been going on board each 
of the grain ships for discharge in Scandinavian ports. 
The grain will be used there for cattle feed. 
(Continued on Page Eighteen) 





Animal Importer B 




The careful handling which cargoes receive at State 
Ports installations brings dividends. This was emphatical- 
ly driven home when F. J. Zeehandelaar imported a second 
cargo of wild animals from the jungles of India through 
State Docks, Wilmington. 

After watching his first load come off, the importer 
remarked that when opportunity offered he would cer- 
tainly use these facilities again. 

And not months later he did. 

Mr. Zeehandelaar is president of North Atlantic Ferti- 
lizer & Chemical Co. of New York, one of the top animal 
importing firms of the country. 

This second shipment of wild animals was consider- 
ably larger, consisting of 16 baby elephants, numerous 
jungle cats, and crates and cases of exotic birds and slither- 
ing tropical snakes. 

Buyers, to whom the animals would be delivered, ar- 
rived to select their elephants from a cage inside the State 
Docks warehouse. The animals had been walked from 



ships 

D 

elepr 

Suzy-. 

H 

to bl I; 
( ircu I 
seaso 

L 
out a 
the Jl 
used 
them| 

A 
tion. 
when 
ming 
grate 




gs In Exotic Cargo 



>ng a passageway built of pallets. 
i Hastie of Charleston, shown at left holding 
trunk, was one of the purchasers. He chose 
m advertising gimmick for a television station. 
Vonderheid, circus owner, was also on hand 

is shown on board ship at top left. Since his 
ed Marion, S. C, for winter quarters a few 
, he is well known in this area, 
ing and removal of the animals proceeded with- 
. A small, strongly-built cage arrived on board 
:1 Surveyor, the Isthmian freighter. This was 
ound easier on the pachyderms than heaving 
id on bellybands, it was explained. 

end Mr. Zeehandelaar entertained at a recep- 
rything worked most perfectly," he said, "and 
possible I will bring my cargoes through Wil- 
jYou can count on it. 1 cannot express how 
im." 









TOTAL IMPORT AND EXPORT CARGO TONNAGE 
N. C. STATE DOCKS, WILMINGTON. N. C. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Total First 6 Months. 
Total Last 6 Months 



1952 



21.236.755 
1,535.966 

373.740 



351,575 

22.772.721 
725.315 

23,498.036 



1953 

1,290.625 

8,838.540 

12,999.099 

27,839.277 

11,533.688 

3,829.080 

1,421.513 

10,022.600 

12,542.810 

4,241.480 

103.000 

1.491.520 

66,330.309 
29,822.923 



1954 

1,808.010 

7,856.130 

7,047.304 

3,985.387 

1.223.570 

1,402.720 

3,822.320 

1,917.661 

11.714.365 

15,572.088 

30,569.697 

17,917.782 

23,323.121 
81,513.913 



1955 
5,477.612 
12,354.866 
27,332.255 
21,451.520 
23.597.007 
27,391.699 
5,946.413 
14,894.280 
29,848.082 
29.590.467 
19,714.932 
33,194.475 

117,604.959 
133,188.649 



TOTAL FOR YEAR 23,498.036 96,153.232 104,837.034 250,793.608 

Total Tonnage— Port of Wilmington 3,426,564.000 3,781,702.000 

Taken from: Waterborne Commerce of the United States, Department of Engineers Publication. 



1956 
23,280.876 
28,330.250 
22,768.831 
18,499.715 
24,222.040 
12,079.865 
14,647.255 
23,069.432 
39,378.471 
35,579.602 
14,793.227 
21,934.569 

129,180.577 
149.402.556 

278,583.133 



1957 



MOREHEAD CITY STATISTICS 
NUMBER OF SHIPS. STATE TERMINALS 



Commercial 



1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 



Dry 

Cargo 
.... 1 
....12 
...12 
...37 



Liquid 
Cargo 
44 
50 
39 
41 



Total 



51 
62 
51 
78 



Military 



162 

173 

151 

61 



Grand 
Total 

213 
235 
202 
139 



MOREHEAD CITY STATE TERMINALS & PORT STATISTICS 



Commercial Tonnage State Terminals Total 

1953 29,415 407,736 437.151 

1954 6,177 351,866 358,043 

1955 6,800 292,370 299,170 

1956 41,305 276,094 317,399 



Minitary Tonnage 

State Terminals 

87,438 

210,851 

187,143 

93,622 



Total 
524,590 
568,895 
486,000 
411,022 



^Commercial Tonnage 
Port of Morehead City 
536,685 
504,203 
446,655 



■'Taken from: Waterborne Commerce of the United States, Department of Engineers Publication (Does not include military cargo). 

I5a>ices lUcOe Out Galloads ok Kiblab 

for Construction Work on N. C. Outer Banks 




Construction work on North Carolina's 
Outer Banks has called for a continuing 
supply of riprap, the irregular stones to be 
clumped without order to make a founda- 
tion or a sea wall. 

Dozens of carloads of the stone have ar- 
rived at the State Terminals, and the rip- 
rap has been moved to barges and towed 
up the Inland Waterway and across the 
sounds to the construction sites. 

Some 14 thousand tons of the stone 
have moved through the State facility in 
connection with this construction work. 

Photo below shows a view of a railcar, 
and the other gives a view from the dock. 




U. S. LINKS SCHEDULES 



New Service Bringing Cargoes From British Isles 



State Docks Linked with 
Manchester, Liverpool 

Regular scheduled services are the founda- 
tion blocks upon which ports build up greater 
business. It was therefore a most welcome an- 
nouncement that U. S. Lines is beginning a 
new service bringing to Wilmington cargoes 
loaded at Manchester, Liverpool, and, as freight 
is offered, Glasgow and Dublin. 

The British connection is made even more 
attractive in thai Wilmington is listed as first 
port of call in this service. 

Peter B. Ruffin, president of Wilmington 
Shipping Co., recently made the announcement 
and said that ships of the U. S. Lines' South 
Atlantic division will call at the State Docks 
on this monthly schedule. 

Chemicals, machinery, and manufactured 
steel are among the first shipments arriving, 
and in time larger and more diversified cargoes 
are expected as the connection is more fully 
exploited. 




SS SOUTIISTAR, shown loading woodpulp on its most recent call at X. ('. 
Docks, is one of the ships which will operate in the new service. 



V 



MAID OE COTTON 

SPA's Prettiest Visitor 

The prettiest visitor to appear at the State Docks 
in many a moon is Pat Cowden, who is the 1956 Maid 
of Cotton and deserves it. 

In big photo she is shown with her ( hapcroiK . Mis- 
Hannah Block ol Wilmington, on board the American 
freighter Flying Cloud, where she called on the < aptain 
and exclaimed it was the first ship on which she had 
ever been. 

Alter inspecting some Egyptian cotton which was 
being warehoused at the- time she had lunch with 
Wilmington's Mayor Dan I). Cameron. 





tobacco G< 



iacco ^alcoes 

Attract Record 
Number of Vessels 



The Ports Authority's State Terminals at Morehead 
City have set a new high in tobacco cargoes: More ships 
have been attracted into port to load leaf than in any 
previous year. 

Photos on this page show the eleventh and record- 
setting call, which was made by MS Goettingen. The 
freighters putting in to pick up tobacco cargoes will more 
than double the previous record by year's end, according to 
present indications. 

When the German ship tied up at N. C. Ocean Termi- 
nals a variety of activities began. Top photos show steve- 
doring, with hogsheads of tobacco moving into the ship's 
hold and being stowed there. 

At right Captain Richard Cammann is being inter- 
viewed by reporter from an Eastern Carolina television 
station, while below, members of the crew engage in routine 
seamanship: Sailors paint the overhead behind loading op- 
eration and, at bottom right, secure booms after the hold 
is loaded and hatch is covered. 






Colonel Man's Statement. 



■ 



HE one outstanding development at the ports authority's installation in 

rcceni months has been ihc growing diversity ol cargoes. A widei and widei 
variety of commodities arc moving across the docks, and this trend is producing 

the most satislac tor) results. 

At the State I)o( ks, Wilmington, one result has been the addition ol .1 new 
scheduled service which brings cargoes monthly from the British Kirs, while ai 
the State Terminals, More-head City, a movement ol grain to Scandinavia is cur- 
rently bringing in one or two vessels each month and some 75 i<> loo railcars 
to deliver each load. 

Arriving on the new British Isles service will he commodities such as ma- 
chinery, manufactured steel, and chemicals. The ports authority solicitation has 
been instrumental in pushing sufficient quantities of these items through the Stale 
Docks to warrant a continuing schedule, and now that this step is taken the 
exploitation of this service can be expected to produce even greater tonnage and 
more diverse cargoes. 

It is particularly attractive to shippers that this is direct service which will 
bring in cargoes to Wilmington as first port of call. This direct shipment means 
a saving in time which aside from the convenience of receiving the cargo cjuic kl\ 
also gives economy in reduced insurance charges. 

Shipments will be taken on board at Manchester, Liverpool, Glasgow, and 
Dublin. Vessels of the South Atlantic service of U. S. Lines will make the run, 
these being ships which are calling already on the North Continent schedule: 
Southport, Southstar, and Southwind. 

Diversity is apparent too at State Terminals, Morehead Cit\. Ships calling 
here for tobacco have also picked up a variety of commodities to accompam the 
hogsheads. In the last year such items have been barrel staves, oranges, frozen 
poultry, and fish oil, as well as a quantity of deer tongue, an Eastern Carolina 
herb which Germans regard highly as a tobacco flavoring agent. 

The first transoceanic movement of grain here took place in [ate summer. 
and the ports authority's grain loader was used for the liist time to load into a 
ship's hold. The Inter-Oceanic Commodity Corp. brings in midwestern so\a 
pellets for bulk loading for Scandinavian ports on an average ol once a month. 
Moore-McCormack and U. S. Lines have supplied the vessels. 

It seems apparent that the state ports will continue their growth. Dry 
cargo moving through the State Terminals at Morehead City amounts to some 
40,000 tons, which is about five times the volume previously handled here. I he 
recently finished fumigation plant has serviced some of the last six tobacco cargoes 
moving OUl I torn here and should prove a strong alt 1 ac (ion to tobacco shippers in 
the new year. The movement ol bulk liquids and military supplies, forming the 
major tonnage al this installation, can be expected to continue at their 1 uncut 
levels. At St. tie Docks. Wilmington, the new service and the two new gantry 
c taues (an be counted on to attract additional cargoes. Indeed, the limited 
berthing space and warehousing lacilities will likely call for .1 more intensified 
campaign here to avoid congestion. 




Wilmincton 



N. C. STATE DOCKS 
PHILIP L. SULLIVAN, Operations Manager 



WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. 
It is capable of berthing three 500-ft. vessels 
simultaneously, with depth of 32 feet at mean 
low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS : Two transit sheds of 79,000 
square feet each, constructed of steel, concrete 
and masonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE : One storage warehouse of 86,- 
100 square feet, constructed of steel, concrete 
and masonry, with sprinkler and deluge sys- 
tems. 

OPEN STORAGE: Three acres of paved open 
storage, easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES : One complete weighing station, hand- 
ling both trucks and rail cars. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with 
crossovers, full length of wharf apron ; also 
depressed tracks at rear of transit sheds and 
warehouse, entire length. Storage yard on 
property for 240 freight cars. 



HEAVY EQUIPMENT : 

now in operation. 



One 45-ton gantry crane 



One 35-ton locomotive crane and one 25-ton 
locomotive crane. 

Two Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT : Fork lifts 
of various sizes with accessories such as cotton 
clamps, etc. Light and heavy tractors and 
trailers and straddle trucks. Facilities for full 
palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING : Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at the transit 
sheds and warehouse; ramps for easy access 
into sheds and warehouse ; portable side and 
end loading ramps for rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fu- 
migation plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES : Telephone, electricity and Federal- 
ly approved potable water supply at shipside. 
Export crating service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and 
Seaboard Air Line Railroad Companies and 
numerous highway motor transportation com- 
panies. 

SECURITY : Security force on duty at all times. 



Ulclelteaa C((u 

N. C. OCEAN TERMINALS 
J. D. HOLT, Operations Manager 



;^ 



WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. 
It is capable of berthing four 500-foot cargo 
ships and one petroleum tanker, with a depth 
of 30 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS : One transit shed of 60,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry with sprinklers. 

One transit shed, 32,000 square feet, construct- 
ed of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 

A third transit shed, the newest, is of pre-fab- 
ricated steel construction with sprinklers and 
has capacity of 40,000 square feet. 

WAREHOUSES: Two storage warehouses, to- 
taling 88,000 square feet, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: A large open storage area 
is available. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with 
crossover, full length of wharf. Single depress- 
ed track full length of rear of transit sheds 
and warehouses. Atlantic and East Carolina 
Railway freight car storage yard adjacent to 
Port property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 
with detachable accessories such as barrel 
clamps, cotton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities 
for full palletization of cargoes. 
Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Equipment for the loading 
of grain in ships or barges available. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks 
for loading and unloading at transit sheds and 
warehouses; ramps for easy access into transit 
sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Up-to-date fumigation plant of 
most modern concrete and steel construction is 
now in operation. Large single chamber is of 
latest design. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federal- 
ly-approved potable water supply at shipside 
Served by Atlantic and East Carolina Rail- 
way Co. One interstate truck line on property, 
and served by numerous highway motor trans- 
portation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



INSTALLED AT DOCKS 



Gantry Crane 



The first of two gantry cranes being installed at State 
Docks, Wilmington, is going into operation and will add 
speed in loading cargoes already moving across the wharf. 

The second gantry, when completed in late spring or 
early summer, will operate in tandem with the first and 
the two together will perform very heavy lifts and attract 
cargoes that heretofore have had to be refused. 

Each crane will lift 45 tons. By working them together, 
lifts approaching 90 tons can be effected. 

Each is being fitted with magnets to facilitate loading 
of scrap metal. These magnets, one of which is shown on 
rail car before being installed, measure 80 inches in dia- 
meter and weigh 9i/ 2 tons. With each lift, the magnet 
will move something over two tons of scrap. Their efficien- 
cy is expected to cut loading time of a scrap ship by about 
two-thirds. 



CRANE ASSEMBLY — The heaviest lift in connection with assembling 
the new 45-ton crane is shown below as two floating cranes start hoist- 
ing the gantry's cab before sliding the legs underneath. Cab weighs 
some 32 tons. Fitting the cab exactly on the circular track on which it 
swings proved the most tedious part of the operation. 



Grain in Bulk 

(Continued from Page Eight) 

Inter-Oceanic Commodity Corp. is shipper, and scores 
of rail cars arrive from the Midwest to deliver each cargo. 
Since the movement began, at least one ship has called 
every month to take on grain. 

Moore-McCormack Lines have supplied most of the 
freighters. The first to call was SS Mormacisle, whose 
skipper, Capt. R. H. Day, is shown on page nine. A U. S. 
Lines ship, SS Benjamin Chew, a converted Liberty, ar- 
rived with a native North Carolinian as master, Capt. 
William C. Hurley, formerly of Newton. He is shown on 
same page, in uniform. 



| 5THM!AN) LliNiEISi 



India, Pakistan, Ceylon 
Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq 
Thailand, Burma 
Hawaiian Islands 
Malaya, Philippines 

Indonesia, Cambodia, Laos, Viet Nam 
Alexandria, Lebanon, Red Sea 
Near and Middle East 

Wilmington Agents 

Wilmington Shipping Co. Tei. Wilmington 2-338 1 





SOUTH ATLANTIC LINE 

Regular Service Between North Carolina Ports and 

Ireland 

United Kingdom 
and North 
Continental 
Europe 

Wilmington Agent 

Wilmington 
Shipping Co. 

Wilmington 2-3381 

AMERICAN PIONEER LINE 

South Atlantic Ports Direct to 

Honolulu - Yokohama - Manila - Keelung - Kobe 
and other Far East Ports 

Will Call at Baltic and Scandinavian Ports 
When Sufficient Cargo Is Offered. 

UNITED STATES LINES CO. 

Wilmington Agents: Heide & Co. 

Charleston Agents: Carolina Shipping Co. 

New York 4. N. Y. DIgby 4-5800 



HEIDE & CO., INC. 


STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 


LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 


FORWARDING AGENTS 


SAMPLERS 


SWORN WEIGHERS 


STEVEDORES 


vo3^ c WILMINGTON 
* #ffiih * NORTH CAROLINA 


jS0Yi Cable Address 


?0J3ilM' "HEIDE" WILMINGTON-CAROLINA 


Telephone 3-5161 


Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 


Registration No. 223 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

TELEPHONES 6-4652 & 6-3248 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 



Peter B. Ruffin 

President 



W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 



William T. Davies 

Manager 

W. D. Williams 

Secretary 

I. P. Wilson 

Treasurer 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder Registration No. 376 



READY TO SERVE . . . 
Your Port Of Wilmington Needs 

In every phase of the agricultural and 
industrial development of North Caro- 
lina, this bank has been an important 
factor. 

It has consistently cooperated with the 
grower, the manufacturer, the shipper 
and the merchant, helping to make 
North Carolina the prosperous, progres- 
sive State that it is. 

THE 
WILMINGTON SAVINGS 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

"NORTH CAROLINA'S PORT BANK" 

COMMERCIAL • TRUST • SAVINGS 

Established 1888 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Cc:; 
Member Federal Reserve Sv 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

P. O. Box 1619 

WILMINGTON. N. C. 



BULK RATE 

U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Permit No. 225 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE LIBRARY 
RALEIGH, N.C. 



FORM 3547 REQUESTED 



SHIP LAUNDRY 

ONE DAY SERVICE 

IDEAL LAUNDRY AND 
DRY CLEANERS. INC. 

FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE 6651 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



CUMMINS 



Cummins Diesel 
Sales Corporation 



P. O. Box 1586 N. Main St. Extension 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 

JOHN FAUNCE. Mgr. Telephone 2-4136 

MARINE — AUTOMOTIVE — CONSTRUCTION — INDUSTRIAL 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of 

Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and Bridges and 

Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK, N. Y. 



AREA REPRESENTATIVE 



WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 



GREENHEART is hightly resistant to marine borers, to fire and to 

abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, dolphins, 

rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State docks 
at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 



PROVISIONS, 


DECK AND 


ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 


o. 


E. 


D 


uRANT 






SHIP 


CHANDLER 




Representative of 










Columbia Rope 




Wilmington, 


N. C. 


International Paint 




Telephone 


4232 


Socony-Vacuum Oil Co 


., Inc 


Water & Market Sts. 






/ferth Care' , State Library 
.kaleigh 




WOODPULP OUTLOADINC A TOP EXPORT COMM> 




STATE PORT 



JUNE. 1957 



HEIDE & CO., INC 

Steamship Agents and 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 



OYO'S AGC/v 



Cable Address 

"KEIDE" M0REHEADCITY-CAR0LINA 

P. O. Box 322 

Telephone 6-3652 

R. L HICKS, Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 




PETER B. RUFFIN, President W. P. EMERSON, Vice-President 

W. D. WILLIAMS, Secretary ). P. WILSON, Treasurer 

Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

Licensed Customhouse Brokers 
Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 1809 
Telephone 2-3381 



Cable Address 
WILSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT 

INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



PAVING CONTRACTORS 

ANY SIZE JOB ANYWHERE 

E. B. TOWLES 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

DIAL 2-0359 
Market Street Road 





ASPHALT 

CONCRETE 

AND 

BITUMINOUS 

SURFACE 
TREATMENT 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C S P. A. 



General Offices 
P. (). Box 1619, Wilmington 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

EDWIN PATE, Chairman 

RAYMOND A. BRYAN 

Vice-Chairman 

W. AVERY THOMPSON 

Secretary -Treasurer 

|. HARRY WHITE, Member 

HARVEY W. MOORE, Member 

HAROLD F. COFFEY, Member 

HENRY A. LINEBERGER, Member 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
RICHARD S. MARR 

TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT 

E. E. LEE, JR., Director 
of Commerce and Traffic 

NEW YORK OFFICE 

39 Broadway, Wing 618 
New York 6, N. Y. 

Bowling Green 9-8389 
TWX: NY 1-4414 

WILLIAM S. CHILDRESS 

New York Representative 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

N. C State Docks 

P. O. Box 1619-Telephone 3-1622 
TWX: WM 77 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN 

Operations Manager 

MOREFIEAD CITY OFFICE 

N. C. Ocean Terminals 

P. O. Box 145-Telephone 6-3159 
TWX: Morehead City, N. C. 8782 

J. D. HOLT, Operations Manager 

WALTER H. FRIEDER1CHS 

Assistant 



June 1957 



Vol. Ill, No. 1 



SELL YOUR STATE PORTS 

This magazine is intended to be read by at least ten people. 
Please pass it on when you are through 



CONTENTS 

Borden's, Inc., Machinery 2 

Potato Cargo 3 

Riegel Carolina 4 

Marine Corps Maneuvers 6 

Superrreighter Evokes Attention 8 

Visiting Ships 10 

SPA Gets Muscle 12 

far Heel Fish Oil 13 

Port Facilities, Wilmington 14 

Port Facilities, Morehead Cit\ IS 

New Ship Service 16 

Supplies tor LI. S. Bases 16 



COVER — WOODPULP 

The greatest single shipment of woodpulp left the State Docks this 
spring in tJte amount of nearly 3,000 tons. This eijuals something 
like a week's production for the nearby Riegel Carolina plant which 
made the shipment. 1 he growing importance of woodpulp as a lead 

ing export commodity is explained on pages six and seven. 




Borden's, Incorporated, 

Machinery Arrives to 

Start New Plant 

NEW industry for Fayetteville, North Carolina, 
moved through the State Docks in the form of a 
German process formaldehyde plant imported bv 
the Borden Company, ex SS Southland. A total of 
100 tons of equipment was brought in for the plant. 
The completed plant produces 36,000,000 pounds 
of formaldehyde annually and will produce as a 
by-product resins for woodworking. Fractionating 
columns and other equipment for manufacturing 
formalin from methanol were imported. 




Captain E. T. Engebretsen— MS SEAGULL 

POTATO CARGO 
AT MOREHEAD 

The trim, yacht-like little MS Seagull is shown 
unloading seed potatoes, a recent cargo ol 18,337 
hags landing at State Terminals, Morehead City, 
while trucks wait to haul them Inland. 1 he ship- 
ment will go to North Carolina Farmers in time For 
spring planting. Grown on Prince Edward Island, 
the Canadian spuds were hauled in heated boxcars 
to Halifax, N. S., where the Norwegian Freighter 
took them on in healed holds. I he 100 lb. bags 
were insulated with straw to avoid Freezing, but 
the straw could not come ashore, h had to be 
dumped at sea when the vessel sailed. 









MODERN WOODPULP PLANT— LOCATED AT ACME, NORTH CAROLINA 



RIEGEL CAROLINA, SHIPPER 



Wood arrives by rail car and truck. Plant's output is 
500 tons of finished pulp each day. 




i 



WOODPULP RANKS AMONG 
TOP EXPORTS 



After only a few hours of loading, transit shed remains packed with 
cargo. As loading end approaches, small stacks of cargo are dotted 
around shed. State Docks has experienced years of practice in loading 
the 500 lb. packages of woodpulp. As loading goes, woodpulp handles 
easily. 



w< 



OOUPULP, which is the base from which paper is manu- 
factured, has recently established itself as a leading export handled 
at North Carolina ports; whether it will eventually overtake 
scrap metal and tobacco as the commodity providing the top 
tonnage remains to be seen. Chances seem good that it could. 

So far, all woodpulp moving overseas from Tar Heel ports 
comes from Riegel Paper Corporation's plant at Acme, 20 miles 
from the N. C. State Docks at Wilmington. 

The movement has been recognized as one of the outstanding 
examples of a North Carolina industry profitably utilizing a state 
port. Col. Richard S. Marr, Executive Director of the State Ports 
Authority, is enthusiastic about this type of commerce. 

"This state," he points out, "generates many million tons of 
cargo every year that move through out-of-state ports. Much 
of this material can conveniently and economically use North 
Carolina ports. It's the Ports Authority's job," he adds, "to 
bring home this fact to Tar I Ieel industry." 

The Acme pant is known as the Carolina Division of the Riegel 
Paper Corporation, and it is no accident that it finds itself close- 
to deep water transportation. The location was given thoughtful 
consideration by company officials before they decided where to 
establish their multimillion dollar installation, and they will say 
that near-by ocean transportation played a strong part in their 
final vote. 

The current rate of production is a little over 500 tons of 
woodpulp daily. Of this voluminous output, the bulk is ear- 
marked for American consumption. A large amount, however, 
is sold abroad, and the State Docks handle shipments destined 
for north continental and United Kingdom ports. Stacked in 
the SPA warehouses and transit sheds are frequently found bays 
full ot the product marked for Belgium, Holland, Germany, and 
England. 

Inside the wrapping paper, pulpwood resembles uniform, white 
sheets of very hard and thick blotting paper. The packages them- 
selves are of similar size, each weighing 500 pounds. Slings from 
a ship's boom usually carry six packages into the hold at a time. 
As cargo goes, the packages move handily into the ship's below 
decks storage areas. 

Dr. C. E. Hartford, Vice-President, explained that the Caro- 
lina Mill has increased its production steadily since going into 
operation. The original mill, representing an investment of ap- 
proximately 21 million dollars, started operations in December 
1951. It was designed to turn out a daily volume of 200-250 
tons of woodpulp. Through the expenditure of approximately 
10 million dollars, the capacity of the plant has been increased 
to the present level of 500 tons per day. 

Shipments over the State Docks have shown steady growth, 
as the pulp plant has expanded. In the first quarter of this year, 
shipments were at about six times the 1954 rate. 

A new bleaching process enables Riegel to produce a high 
brightness pulp with excellent strength properties. This pulp is 
finding wide acceptance, and apparently sales are booming 
on the Continent. 

To back this up, Ports Authority records show that throe 
woodpulp shipments moved out of Wilmington the second week 
of March. One was the largest such shipment ever to move out 
of Wilmington. The 3.000 tons went on board the SS Southpoit 
destined for the United Kingdom. 

. Reigel takes no chance that the area's timber supplv will be 
exhausted. A replanting program is one of the major undertakings 
of the Acme plant. Dr. 1 lartford said the planting season extends 
from November into March. "We set a new record this vear," he- 
added. "We set out 8 and one-quarter million seedlings on about 
nine thousand acres." In connection with this project, Riegel co- 
operates with nearby suppliers in tree farming and protection 
against forest fire; so that in addition to replanting and rebuilding 
its own acreage, the company is busy helping maintain the 
adjacent territory which supplies lumber. 





Back From Maneuvers 



Marine Corps equipment used in spring war games 
at Vieques is shown going ashore at State Terminals, 
Morehead City, from one of two landing ships. An am- 



phibious landing craft loaded with a tractor and bulldozer 
was moved to one of the State Port's ramps to land the 
equipment. 




Spectators and families welcome 
home the Marines 




Marine MP directing heavy vehic- 
ular traffic at Morehead City Ocean 
Terminals. 




SUPERFREICHTER— This huge 525- 
foot superfreighter is the Marine 
Fiddler of the Military Sea Trans- 
port Service. It loaded 500 tons 
of military vehicles at State Ports 
Docks recently — but the 500 tons 
caused hardly a change in the 
draft of the vessel. The Marine 
Fiddler at one time during the 
Korean War carried 36 locomotives 
and 10 hospital cars, each 80 feet 
long, from San Francisco to Korea. 
The vessel cruises at 17)^ knots 
and has a cruising range of 8,000 
miles. 




SUPERFREIGHTER 

EVOKES 

ATTENTION 



M. 



One of the most unusual freighters plying the high sea; 
docked at the North Carolina State Docks in Wilmingtor 
recently to load vehicles for northern European and Medil 
terranean ports. 

The Marine Fiddler, a Military Sea Transport Service vesf 
sel, designed to carry some of the heaviest waterbome freight 
in the world, loaded some 500 tons of military vehicles all 
the port. The over-all length of the freighter is 525 feet. 

The cargo-carrying capacity of the Marine Fiddler is so vasW 
that 500 tons of vehicles scarcely changed the draft of the 
big vessel. 

"We are a heavy lift ship," Capt. Elmer W. Malanot exHj 
plained, "our deadweight cargo capacity is over 13,000 tons.' 

The Marine Fiddler is to the average freighter what the supei 
tanker is to the regular tanker. She is designed to carry heavier 
cargo farther and faster than other freighters. At present there 
are two of her type in operation. The SS Marine Fiddler oni 
the Atlantic, and the SS Brostrom on the Pacific. 



!■ 




S. MARINE FIDDLER 



The vessel is actually a converted C-4, but the conversion 
/as a vast one that changed her from a seven hatch ship to 
five hatch ship. 

Undoubtedly the most striking feature of the vessel is her 
argo handling equipment. 

Two jumbo cargo booms with a rated lifting capacity of 
50 tons each are capable of lifting some of the largest and 
leaviest pieces of equipment that may be shipped aboard the 
•essel. The jumbo booms are actually tested to lift 180 tons 
rom docks and lower it into the giant holds of the ship. 

Looking into the hold is like looking down into an audi- 
orium the size of an athletic auditorium. Their capacity 
natches the lifting power of the huge booms. 

"The ship originally cost about six to seven million dollars," 
fJapt. Malanot explained, "and the conversion from a C-4 
nto a heavy lift ship cost about $4,000,000 more, but the 
■hip has more than paid for itself since its conversion." 

What use has the federal government made of the Marine 
"•iddler? During the Korean War, for instance, a load of 36 



locomotives weighing 140 tons each, and ten hospital cars, 
each 80 feet long, were loaded aboard the ship at San Fran- 
cisco and carried to Korea. 

The vessel carried atomic weapons to overseas garrisons and 
much of the equipment to the bomb tests at Eniwetok and 
Bikini. 

The Marine Fiddler's holds are 100 feet by 70 feet, capable 
of carrying both bulk and weight. Her deck load capacity 
is also impressive. Her hatches are covered bv pontoons capable 
ol carrying 80 ton loads on each pontoon. In recent years she 
has loaded tugboats onto her deck and carried them o\ crsca*. 

The huge jumbo booms will list the ship about 12 degrees 
when they are swung out. ship officers reported. 

And with all her vast cargo carrying capacity the Marine 
liddler has speed to match. She cruises at 1 _1 : knots and has 
a cruising range ol 8. (XXI miles. 

Alter leaving Wilmington the Marine I iddler scheduled 
calls to at leas! two other ports to pick up more cargo lor her 
trip to Europe and the Mediterranean. 




In addition to their function as North Caro- 
lina's principal commercial ports, the State 
ports' installations at Wilmington and More- 
head City frequently make their facilities 
available to men-of-war and military ships on 
training missions, defense operations, and sur- 
vey cruises. These units illustrate the role 
that the North Carolina State Docks and the 
Ocean Terminals could play in the national 
defense picture. 



USS Parle, USS Nimble, USS Coates 







U. S. Coast & Geodetic Survey vessels, the Stimi, the Bowen, and the Parker; 
U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Mendota, background 





USS New, USS Holder 



In recent months the State Ports Authority 
docks in Wilmington and Morehead City have 
been made available to U. S. Navy units on 
both regular operations and reserve cruises, 
U. S. Coast Guard Cutters, Coast and Geo- 
detic Service craft, British Naval units, and 
other military craft that have visited North 
Carolina. 



All at State Docks, Wilmington 




U. S. Navy Minesweeper, USS Reed Bird 
H.M.S. Bigbury Bay 



U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Chilula. Morehead City Ocean Terminals 
Corps of Engineers dredge Henry Bacon 







I 



* "it ' 




New Gantry Cranes at State Docks, Wilmington 



SPA Gets Muscle For 90-Ton Lifts 



During June the North Carolina State Docks at Wil- 
mington saw the installation of a second gantry crane 
that wall enable this facility to load cargoes that were 
previously too heavy for dockside equipment. 

The new piece of equipment, a 45-ton capacity crane, 
will permit dockside lifts of up to 90 tons when made 
in tandem with the gantry unit that has been in use 
for the past several months. 

The unit will not only increase the lift capacity of the 
Wilmington installation, but will also provide for a more 
flexible operation at the docks and will permit more 
rapid handling of bulk cargoes at the dock. 



The addition of the new gantry will bring Wilmington 
into line with the most modern South Atlantic ports and 
will make this port capable of handling a variety of car- 
goes that were previously not feasible at North Carolina 
ports. 

The gantry was brought to Wilmington from Savannah 
by barge via the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. Tech- 
nicians and workmen assembled the units after lifting 
them from the barge. After tests and adjustments the 
new crane will swing into operation loading Tar Heel 
cargoes into world commerce. 




Fish Oil Is Loaded At Morehead City Aboard Pioneer Wave 




Tar Heel Fish Oi 
For Germany 

The largest cargo oi fish oil to be outloadcd 
from the North Carolina Ocean Icrminal al 
Morehead City in the histon oi that installa 
tion was loaded aboard the SS Pioneer \\ ave 
during April. 

A record catch of menhaden in the More 
head Cit\ area provided over 2.000 tons ol the 
fish oil for the Pioneer Wave. 

1 he oil was not onl\ obtained from Fish 
taken oil the North Carolina coast but was 
also localb processed. 1 he shipment marked 
the first movement ol this product through a 
North Carolina port in volume. Previously the 
oil had been transported to other, out ol siau 
ports In land transportation before being 
shipped overseas. 

I he cargo was discharged al Hamburg, 
Germany, for manufacture into margarine. \ 
total ol five lish oil shipments nave moved 
through Morehead CitJ during the earb pan 
ol the year. 

I he Pioneer Wave is a converted escort 
carrier now operating as a United States Lines 
freighter. 1 he Morehead Cit\ Shipping Com 
pany was cargo agent and Cargill. Inc.. was 
cargo ow ner. 




WILMINGTON 

N. C. STATE DOCKS 
PHILIP L. SULLIVAN, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing three 500-ft. vessels simultaneously, with 
depth of 32 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 square 
feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry, 
with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry, 
with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

OPEN STORAGE: Three acres of paved open storage, 
easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling both 
trucks and rail cars. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron; also depressed tracks at 
rear of transit sheds and warehouse, entire length. 
Storage yard on property for 240 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes 
now in operation. 



One 35-ton locomotive crane and one 25-ton locomotive 

crane. 

Two Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of 
various sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. Light and heavy tractors and trailers and straddle 
trucks. Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck docks 
for loading and unloading at the transit sheds and 
warehouse; ramps for easy access into sheds and ware- 
houses; portable side and end loading ramps for rail 
cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumigation 
plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. Export crat- 
ing service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Seaboard 
Air Line Railroad Companies and numerous highway 
motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 




MOREHEAD CITY 



N. C. OCEAN TERMINALS 
J. I). HOLT, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petro- 
leum tanker, with a depth of 30 feet at mean low 
water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60.000 square 
feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry with 
sprinklers. 

One transit shed, 32,000 square leet, constructed ol 
galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 

A third transit shed, the newest, is ol prc-labricatcd 
steel construction with sprinklers and has capacity 
of 40,000 square feet. 

WAREHOUSES: Two storage warehouses, totaling 
(S8.000 square feet, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: A large open storage area is avail 

able. 

IRACKACE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track lull length 
ol rear ol transit sheds and warehouses. Atlantic and 
East Carolina Railway freight car storage yard adjacent 
to Port property . 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork hits with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 

clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities lor lull palletization "I 
cargoes. 
I factors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Equipment for the loading -I 

grain in ships or barges available. 

LOADING AM) UNLOADING: Truck docks for 

loading and unloading at transit sheds .\m.\ warehouses. 

ramps for eas} access into transit sheds and warehouses. 

FLLMIGA I ION : Up-to-date fumigation plant o[ most 
modern concrete -\ni\ steel construction is now in 

operation. Large single chamber is ol latest design. 

SERVICES: I elephone. electricity mi^ Federally ap 
proved potable water supply .it shipside. Served b\ 
Atlantic ,wn\ last Carolina Railway Co. One inter 
state truck line on property, and served b\ numerous 

highway motor transportation companies. 
SI C UPd IV Secuim force on dut\ at all tunes. 



New Ship Service Established 



The establishment of a regular steamship service from 
Wilmington to Caribbean and northern South American 
ports was announced in early June. 

1 he fortnighth service bv the Royal Netherlands 
Steamship Company was announced jointly by Peter B. 
Ruffin, president of the Wilmington Shipping Company, 
and Richard S. Marr, Executive Director of the North 
Carolina State Ports Authority. 

Service is expected to begin June 24 with the sailing 
of the SS Schie from the State Docks in Wilmington. 
This sailing will be followed every two weeks by other 
Roval Netherlands' vessels. 



The Royal Netherlands' steamships will connect Wil- 
mington with Port-au-Prince, Haiti; Ciudad Trujillo, 
Dominican Republic; La Guaira, Venezuela; Puerto Ca- 
bello, Venezuela; Curacao, British West Indies; and Port 
of Spain, Trinidad. 

The new service will place North Carolina producers 
in contact with the Caribbean markets at a saving to the 
producers and the shippers. It also means that North 
Carolina will be served by a third major steamship line 
and a fourth major steamship route. At present, the 
United States Lines have regular service into Wilming- 
ton on two routes, one to United Kingdom ports and an- 
other to North Sea ports. The Isthmian Steamship Line 
serves Wilmington from India and Pakistan. 




Military Vehicles Swing Aboard SS Habana, Lifted by Gantry Crane 



Supplies For U. S. Overseas Bases 



Among the important new cargoes developed at North 
Carolina's State port installations during recent months 
have been military shipments of vehicles and equipment. 

At the North Carolina State Docks in Wilmington at 
least two major shipments of military vehicles have been 
outloaded during the early part of the year. 

In mid-March the Spanish freighter, SS Habana, 
loaded a total of 36 five-ton tractor trucks for U. S. Air 
Force bases in Spain. In April the Military Sea Transport 
Service vessel Marine Fiddler loaded 500 tons of military 
vehicles for transportation to a number of European ports 
on the Atlantic and the Mediterranean. 



The shipments have been made possible bv the instal- 
lation of gantry cranes at the North Carolina State Docks. 
The new cranes have a lifting capacity that facilitates the 
handling of heavy military cargoes. 

Both the shipments were made with the supervision 
of Transportation Corps officials. The Wilmington docks, 
located only a short distance upriver from the vast Trans- 
portation Corps installation at Sunny Point, permit a 
close relationship between the two installations. 

Maj. Gen. Evan M. Houseman of the Transportation 
Corps was recently a guest at the North Carolina State 
Docks and expressed interest in the Wilmington port 
facility's role in defense shipments. 



Wilmington: Office 2-3327 — Res. 3-2893 


QlMMYsmODUCF 


FROZEN FOOD CO. S 


WHOLESALE 


Ship Chandlery Division 


Provisions — Deck and Engine Supplies 


JIMMY BATUYIOS 


P.O. Box 1676 121 Hanover St. 


WILMINGTON, N. C. 


Serving Wilmington and Morehead City 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

Telephones 6-4652 & 6-3248 



CABLE ADDRESS 


William T. Davies 


MORESHIPCO 


Manager 


Peter B. Ruffin 


W. D. Williams 


President 


Secretary 


W. P. Emerson 


J. P. Wilson 


Vice-President 


Treasurer 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder Registration No. 376 



HEIDE & CO., INC 

Steamship Agents and 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 
STEVEDORES 



v o*°' s AG ^ C 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Cable Address 

HEIDE" WILMINGTON-CAROLINA 
Telephone 3-5161 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 223 



READY TO SERVE . . . 
Your Port Of Wilmington Needs 

In every phase of the agricultural and industrial 
development of North Carolina, this bank has been 
an important factor. 

It has consistently cooperated with the grower, the 
manufacturer, the shipper and the merchant, help- 
ing to make North Carolina the prosperous, pro- 
gressive State that it is. 

THE 
W I LMI NGTON SAVI NGS 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

"North Carolina's Port Bank" 
COMMERCIAL • TRUST • SAVINGS 

Established 1888 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Member Federal Reserve System 



C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 1619 
WILMINGTON. N. C. 



NORTH CAROXINA UBRAHJ COMMISSION 
RAISIGH, JUJ* 



BULK RATE 

U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Permit No. 225 



FORM 3547 REQUESTED 



CUMMINS 



Cummins Diesel 
Sales Corporation 



P. 0. Box 1586 N. Main St. Extension 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 

PHIL L. SMITH, Mgr. J. LACIE BUIE, Sales Engineer 

Telephone 2-4136 
MARINE — AUTOMOTIVE — CONSTRUCTION — INDUSTRIAL 



SHIP LAUNDRY 

ONE DAY SERVICE 

• 

IDEAL LAUNDRY AND 
DRY CLEANERS, INC. 

Front and Orange Streets — Phone 6651 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 

"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of 

Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and Bridges and 

Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE— NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Area Representative — Wilmington Shipping Co. 

CREENHART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and to 

abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, dolphins, 

rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State docks 
at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 



Provisions, 


Deck 


and 


Engineer's 


Supplies 





. E. 


D 


uRANT 






SHIP 


CHANDLER 




Representative of 






Wilmi 


ngton, N. C. 


Columbia Rope 






Tel 


ephone 4232 


International Pa 


int 




Water 


& Market Sts. 


Socony-Vacuum 


Oil Co. 


, Inc 








North Carolina truck taxes pay 43% 
per cent of the State's entire bill for 
construction, upkeep and administra- 
tion of the highway system. More than 
1,800 North Carolina communities are 
served only by truck transportation. 

N. C. MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN., Inc. 
Raleigh, N. C. 




*m. 



fti 





s 



,\ regular caller at \\ ilmington's Sititc Docks 



WILMINGTON 




MOREHEAD CITY 



FALL 1957 



HEIDE & CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 



OYO'S AGe*^ 



Cable Address 

'HEIDE" MOREHEADCITY-CAROLINA 

P. O. Box 300 

Telephone 6-3652 

R. L. HICKS, Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 




PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 

W. D. WILLIAMS 

Secretary 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Assistant Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Vice-President 

J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 

LEMUEL L. DOSS. JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Company 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 1809 
Telephone RO 2-3381 



Cable Address 
W1LSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT 

INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



SOUTH ATLANTIC LINE 

Regular service between North Carolina Ports and Ireland, United 
Kingdom, and North Continental Europe will call at Baltic and 
Scandinavian ports when sufficient cargo offers. 




AMERICAN PIONEER LINE 

South Atlantic Ports direct to Honolulu, Yokahoma, Manila, Keev- 
ing, Kobe and other Far East Ports. 

SOUTH ATLANTIC LINE 

Wilmington Agent — Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Phone RO 2-3381 

AMERICAN PIONEER LINE 

Wilmington Agent— Heide & Co. — Phone RO 3-5161 

UNITED STATES LINES CO. 

NEW YORK 4, N. Y. DIGBY 4-5800 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF V ( . S P. A 



General Offices 
P. O. Box 1619, Wilmington 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

EDWIN PATE, Chairman 

RAYMOND A. BRYAN, 

V ice-Chairman 

W. AVERY THOMPSON, 

Secretary-Treasurer 

J. HARRY WHITE, Member 

HARVEY W. MOORE, Member 

HAROLD F. COFFEY, Member 

HENRY A. LINEBERGER, Member 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

RICHARD S. MARR 

TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT 

E. E. LEE, JR. Director 
of Commerce and Traffic 

NEW YORK OFFICE 

39 Broadway, Wing 618 
New York 6, N. Y. 

Bowling Green 9-8389 
TWX: NY 1-4414 

WILLIAM S. CHILDRESS 

New York Representative 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

N. C. State Docks 

P. O. Box 1619 — Telephone 

ROger 3-1622 

TWX: WM 77 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN 

Operations Manager 



Fall, 1957 



\<>i . III. No. 1 



SELL YOUR STATE PORTS 

This magazine is intended to be read by at least ten people. 
Please pass it on when you arc through. 



CONTENTS 

Wilmington's Industrial Expansion 2 

Executive Director's Statement 4 

Morehead City Centennial 5 

Harbor Projects 6 

Dow Facilities Expanded 

Manchester Service 7 

Phosphate Explorations 7 

Holland-America Line 8 

Dairy Products 10 

Gantry Cranes 10 

Tandem Operation 1 1 

Ports Plan Expansion 12 

Port Facilities — Wilmington 14 

Port Facilities — Morehead City 1 5 

Stockholm Returns 16 

More Cruises Set . 16 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

N. C. Ocean Terminals 
P. O. Box 145— Telephone 6-3159 
TWX: Morehead City, N. C. 8782 

J. D. HOLT, Operations Manager 

WALTER H. FRIEDFRICHS 

Assistant 



com n 

The S. S. Southport is just one of the United States Lines vessels making 
regular stops at Wilmington. The new service for the State Docks is less 
than a year old and connects North Carolina with the British hies and tin 
Antwerp-Hamburg range of Continental ports. 



Wilmington's Industrial Expansion 



WILMINGTON SELECTED AS 
NEW PLANT SITE 



Mr. Raymond Largent, vice-president and project 
manager of the Allied-Kennecott Titanium Corpora- 
tion, has announced that Wilmington has been select- 
ed as the site for their multi-million dollar titanium 
sponge plant. The plant will produce titanium billets 
and torgings, and will contain a complete laboratory to 
carry on a program of research and development. 

The plant site is located south of Wilmington on 
the Cape Fear River, and covers approximately 1,500 
acres. This location offers low cost water transportation, 
water for cooling purposes, with a plentiful supply of 
labor in the immediate area. About 500 people will be 
employed at the new plant, some of which will be 
technicians. Plant erection and capital investment will 
amount to approximately $40,000,000. 

Water tests have been made on the site of the plant 
recently. The purpose of the water tests is to determine 
whether the plant will use water obtained from wells 
or from the Cape Fear River. The tests will also reveal 
how much water can be withdrawn from the well and 
how wells, if used, are to be spaced. 

The 138-foet well was dug by the Heater-Wells 
Company of Raleigh, contractor. The chemical quali- 
ties of the water will also be analysed. Up to 700 gal- 
lons per minute have been withdrawn from the well. 

Allied-Kennecott plans soon to clear land, prepara- 
tory to excavation for laying the foundations of the 
plant building. 

Titanium is a very important metal found principal- 
ly in ilmenite and rutile ore, and always with other 
elements. It may be found in several localities, includ- 
ing North Carolina. 

This new wonder metal is stronger than aluminum, 
lighter than steel, and corrosion-resistant. It is used in 
jet engines, guided missiles, chemical equipment, elec- 
tronics and other new and modern ways. 

Allied-Kennecott Titanium Corporation was form- 
ed earlier in the year by Allied Chemical and Dye Cor- 
poration and Kennecott Copper Corporation in order to 
utilize the resources and experiences of each in chem- 
ical processing and metal fabricating. 

The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company was 
instrumental in assisting the corporation to find the 
most logical site for their new plant. 

Wilmington and New Hanover County are indeed 
fortunate to have Allied-Kennecott locate here, and 
the state as a whole will benefit economically from 
the operation. 



m 



NEW MILL WILL EXPAND 



Wilmington's new hosiery mill will soon employ 
close to 500 people. Mr. Samuel Rosenblum, president 
of Hanover Mills, Inc., has announced that a new 
building will be erected on their Carolina Beach Road 
site. The building is now under construction by Indus- 
trial Properties, Inc., a local building corporation. 

Until the completion of the new structure, it is ex- 
pected that the mill will continue operations on a lim- 
ited basis. 



A ASPHALT COMPANY ALSO 
SELECTS SITE 

The American Bituminous and Asphalt Company 
has selected Wilmington as the site for its new 
asphalt terminal. 

Initial contact was made with firm approximately 
five years ago. The announcement was made in Wil- 
mington during the summer. 

The new terminal is expected to be ready for spring 
delivery and will provide improved service in meeting 
current demands for asphalts of all kinds in the Wil- 
mington area and in accommodating anticipated in- 
creases in asphalt requirements for the region. 

The plant is expected to have an overall value of sev- 
eral hundred thousand dollars, and when full produc- 
tion is reached will bring three or four ships per month 
into Wilmingtop harbor with raw asphalt for the plant. 

The company plans to construct its own docks, with 
a one-ship berth. Approximately 40 persons will be 
employed when the plant goes into full production. 
Truckload shipments from the terminal will be handl- 
ed by skilled personnel to insure on-job deliveries at 
proper temperatures. 

The terminal will supply a full line of products for 
streets, road and highway maintenance and construc- 
tion, including asphalt cements, emulsified asphalt 
and asphalt cutbacks. 

The location of the plant is north of the N. C. State 
Docks on the Cape Fear River. The company is a sub- 
sidiary of Standard Oil Company of California. 

♦ SUGAR REFINING COM- 
PANY SELECTS SITE 

The Savannah Sugar Refining Company of Savan- 
nah, Georgia, has announced plans to erect storage 
tanks, an office building, and docks on a site located in 
north Wilmington. 

W. W. Sprague, Jr., Manager of the Liquid Sugar 
Department, made the announcement, and said his 
firm would establish a terminal to handle liquid sugar, 
which is carried via the inland waterway by barge. 

The company will bring in about 1 ,000 tons of liquid 
sugar at a time. It is estimated that the local plant will 
handle 50 million pounds of the sugar per year. 

The product is used in the soft-drink industry and by 
bakeries, and there are many large consumers in North 
Carolina. Savannah Sugar Refining Company pioneer- 
ed liquid sugar in the South, finding it less expensive 
to handle as a liquid than in the crystal form. 

Since much of the work is semi-automatic there will 
not be too many additional jobs created, but some local 
help will be needed. The firm expects to begin its Wil- 
mington activities around the first of the year. Equip- 
ment has already been ordered. 

The liquid sugar will be moved from the Wilmington 
terminal by tanker trucks and railway cars to consum- 
ers in the Carolinas. 



L 



EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S STATEMENT 



The fiscal year just ended showed sound growth and development of our State 
Docks, both at Wilmington and Morehead City. 

Morehead City's dry commercial cargo rose from 19,000 tons in 1955-56 to 
over 40,000 tons in 1956-57. Tobacco cargoes increased from fourteen to 
twenty-four, with a total of 23,400,000 pounds shipped through this port. Liquid 
tonnages remained about the same at Morehead City with a slight decrease in 
petroleum but an increase was shown in glycol and fish oil. Total commercial 
cargoes handled at this port amounted to 311,531 tons. In addition to this, 
82,431 tons of military cargo, in the form of Marine Corps troop movements, 
passed over the docks. 

The State Docks at Wilmington continued their steady growth of past years 
with a total of 314,951 tons of commercial dry cargo handled. Increases were 
shown in almost every major commodity and many new items were handled for 
the first time. 

At Morehead City additions were made to our plant in the way of a fumiga- 
tion chamber and a 40,000 square foot transit shed. 

At Wilmington two gantry cranes — capable of handling, in tandem, 90-tons 
— were added, giving this port sorelv needed heavy lifting equipment. 

A scheduled service was announced by the Holland-America Line for the 
Morehead City port, giving this state an additional service to the continental ports 
of Europe. 

Two new services were announced for the Wilmington port. The first was 
made by Manchester Lines with services to Liverpool, Glasgow, Manchester and 
Dublin, and the second was made by the Royal Netherlands Steamship Line with 
services to the West Indies and Venezuela. 

Our ports should show additional growth during the fiscal year we are just 
entering, for it is felt that the people of North Carolina are now realizing the great 
value of these facilities to them. 




Looking east toward the State Port Terminal, Morehead City's 
9-streets wide and 38-streets long peninsula can be seen stretch- 
ing toward Beaufort. Bogue Sound can be seen on the right 
while the waters of Calico Creek, Newport River and Core 
Creek are on the left. The inland waterway fronts the south 
and east sides of the Port Terminal in the background. 



MOREHEAD CITY 

CELEBRATES 

100TH BIRTHDAY 



Morehead City's gala celebration of its one hund- 
redth birthday was an event long to be talked about and 
remembered by participants and observers from all over 
this section of the country. The big birthday party was 
staged in August and lasted from the fourth through 
the tenth, including events and activities of interest to 
everyone. 

Emphasis was placed on the use that can be made of 
new installations at Morehead, such as riding stables, 
an excellent licet of party boats for fishing enthusiasts, 
pleasure craft accommodations, Fort Macon Park and 
Beach, a new golf course, the new Morehead Biltmore 
Hotel, new developments for summer residents and all- 
year citizens, and a new swimming pool. 



Some of the special events carried on during the Cen- 
tennial were band concerts, a PGA-sanctioned Pro- \m 
Golf Tourney, boat races, and Little Tbcatre presenta- 
tions. An Antique Car Show was held, as well as a large, 
colorful parade, a Water Pageant with a huge fireworks 
display, and many beach activities. 

John Motley Morehead's dream has come true: 
where there was no development to ^pc.ik of a hundred 
vears ago, there is now .1 thriving resort, fishing center 
— both pleasure and commercial — agricultural center. 
and port, with mam new industries developing. These 
facets of Morehead City life are well-known to most 
North Carolinians, and all have contributed to a new 
economy for the state as a whole. 







SURPLUS 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 

MOREHEAD CITY 



Morehead City's Ocean Terminals saw its first move- 
ment of surplus dairy products over the docks in late 
June. 

The cargo, surplus cheese, was sent overseas under 
the CARE program. The new cargo at Morehead City 
was hailed as the first of a series of such shipments 
through the port. 

The three million pounds of cheese was outloaded 
on the Rock Springs Victory, bound for Yugoslavia. 

The Rock Springs Victory is an American vessel un- 
der the managership of the U. S. Department of Com- 
merce. Shipping agent was the Morehead City Ship- 
ping Company. 



The S. S. SOUTHPORT docked in Wilmington re- 
cently to take on a cargo of vehicles for U. S. Air Force 
bases overseas. Shown in the photo below is one of the 
new gantry cranes at North Carolina State Docks as 
it lifts a tank trailer to the ship. Each tanker weighed 
approximately 16,000 lbs. 

In addition to several tankers, the SOUTHPORT 
also loaded small tractors. 

This is just one of several vehicle shipments to leave 
from the State Docks at Wilmington. The frequency 
of such cargoes, particularly heavy lifts, is increasing 
steadily, due in large part to the new gantry cranes. 



NEW GANTRY 

CRANES AT 

STATE DOCKS 




* *SI Ks ^^liH 




Si 






A transformer weighing 47 tons is lifted from the 
hold of the M. S. THOMAS NELSON by two huge 
gantry eranes. Four transformers were unloaded by 
the eranes, setting a record for heavy lifts in the Wil- 
mington Harbor area. 

The THOMAS NELSON tied up at the State Docks 
in Wilmington in August to discharge the transformers, 
which were made in England. They are now at Sevier- 
ville, Tennessee, for use by the Tennessee Valley Au- 
thority. 



In the foreground of the photo the roof of one of the 
transit sheds is shown, with the transformer being low- 
ered to a rail car on the other side, between the shed 
and the ship. Dockside rail facilities on the 46-foot 
apron made it possible to move the heav\ lifts directlv 
from ship to rail car. 

The photo below shows the two ^antn cranes with 
a lift of over 65 tons. When operating in tandem, the 
cranes have a total capacitx of 90 tons. 




yr 


\\ 








\ 


v - 


V 


\ 


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i 


-•\. 


1 




TANDEM 

CRANE 

OPERATION 



^ii'iti imjiiiini i nm 




HOLLAND-AMERICA LI 

Holland-America Line begins scheduled freighter service 





m Morehead City 




For the convenience of North Carolina shippers and consignees, 
the Holland-America Line has included Morehead City in its schedule 
of regular freighter service between East Coast Ports and Northern Eu- 
rope. The service began with the sailing of the SS SCHIEDYK on 
August 10, with a cargo consisting mainly of tobacco. 

The announcement was made by James V. Gurge, Holland-Amer- 
ica's Freight Traffic Manager at New York, during a luncheon aboard 
the MV KINDERDYK prior to her sailing in the company's Red Star 
Line Service. 

It is planned to provide one sailing from Morehead City everv 4 
weeks, linking the port with Antwerp, Rotterdam, Hamburg and Bre- 
men. The present schedule includes the SLOTERDYK September 21, 
MV KLOOSTERDYK October 18, and the SCHIEDYK November 15. 

Among those attending the luncheon were Gov. Luther H. Hodges 
with a party of dignitaries, D. G. Bell, State Senator of Morehead City, 
and Jack Holt, Morehead City Port Manager. 



Left photo: The KINDERDYK taking on tobacco, 3 hogsheads at a time. 

Center photo: Hogsheads going "over the side". 

Right photo: Mr. Edwin Pate, left, looks on as Mr. lames V. Gurge, Freight 
Traffic Manager of Holland- America, shakes hands with Governor Hodges upon 
announcement of regular service between Morehead City and Continental ports. 




HARBOR 
PROJECTS WIN 
APPROVAL 



U. S. Corps of Engineers Dredge Henry Bacon 



Favorable actions on improvements to both major 
North Carolina harbors have been recorded during the 
past several weeks. 

The North Carolina delegation to the National Riv- 
ers and Harbors Congress in Washington, D. C. receiv- 
ed favorable action on projects for dredging at both 
Morehead City and Wilmington. 

Beaufort Inlet Channel and Morehead City harbor 
were given a top priority by the Congress, and a survey 
was endorsed to study the deepening of the Cape Fear 
River from the ocean to Wilmington to a 40-foot 
project depth. 

The Wilmington project was launched after local 



officials studied a natural trough in the river bed in the 
Southport area where the depth exceeds 40 feet. 

A survey of the trough and its possible use in connec- 
tion with commerce was endorsed by the Rivers and 
Harbors Congress. 

The delegation stressed, in relation to the Wilming- 
ton project, that the natural trough in the Cape Fear 
River was the southern-most natural deep-water harbor 
on the Atlantic Coast. It was pointed out that this nat- 
ural asset was expected to be of vast value in light of the 
development of both super-tankers and the jumbo-sized 
bulk load freighters that are today taking their place 
in the commerce of the world. 




«&0*W{mOw*> 



DOW ADDS 

FACILITIES AT 

MOREHEAD CITY 




Dow Chemical Company plans to erect an additional 
storage tank at its Morehead City facilities for handl- 
ing of glycol. Bids have been let and construction is to 
be started immediately by C. M. Hefelfinger and Reco 
Tanks, Inc., of Wilmington, North Carolina and Rich- 
mond, Virginia, respectively. 

Dow is alread\ r engaged in the shipment of glycol by 



tanker out of Morehead City to Freeport, Texas, and 
the new tank will enable the company to store 15,000 
additional barrels. The glycol, which is refined in Texas, 
is a by-product of the DuPont plant in Kinston, North 
Carolina, but is also received from points in New Jer- 
sey and Ohio, resulting in the need for the acldititni.il 
storage facilities mentioned above. 



MANCHESTER VESSELS CALL AT 
WILMINGTON 

One of the four steamship lines making regularly 
scheduled calls at the North Carolina State Docks in 
Wilmington is Manchester Liners, Ltd. Their vessels 
now call at Wilmington every two weeks, and connect 
the port with two of England's ports, Manchester and 
Liverpool. 

There are four ships in this service taking general 
cargo, a substantial amount of which is tobacco, to 
The United Kingdom. They return to Wilmington 
bearing general cargo for unloading at the State Docks. 

Advance schedules listed as the first ship the MAN- 
CHESTER SHIPPER, which called here in August 
and will return on October 1 8 and again on December 
12. The BRAZILIAN PRINCE, September 2 1 , is 
followed by the MANCHI STI R CITY on October 4 
and the MANCHESTER PROGRESS on November 8. 

The new service is expected to make importing and 
exporting much more economical for North Carolina 
firms now doing business abroad and tor those wishing 
to initiate such business. 



PHOSPHATE EXPLORATIONS 

The Bear Creek Mining Compam, a subsidiary of 
Kennecott Copper Company, and a member of the in- 
dustrial family which includes Allied-Kennecott Titan- 
ium Corporation, has requested a lease on 60,000 acres 
of state-owned submerged land in the Pamlico River 
and Pungo River area. Recently, the Mineral Resources 
Committee of the State Department of Conservation 
and Development approved this request, subject to the 
approval of the full board. 

If the explorations of the Hear C reek compam meet 
with success, and sufficient deposits of phosphate are 
discovered, there is c\er\ possibilitv lor the establish 
ment of a twenty-five million dollar industry for the 
area. The compam also plans to acquire some 250,000 
acres from private owners in the territory. 

Under the lease approved b\ the State committee, 
the Hear Creek Mining Compam would paj the State 
a minimum of SI 5,000 per \ear lor up to five years 
while explorations are in progress, \lter mining opera- 
tions begin the State would receive- a minimum of 
$100,000 per year with royalties ol 20 cents per ton 
on a sliding scale. 




One of the many 
shipments of tobacco 
being loaded for export 
from North Carolina 
ports. 



EXPANSIONS PLANNED BY BC 



Engineering contracts were recently signed by en- 
gineers and the State Ports Authority for expansion 
work at the State Docks in Wilmington and the Ocean 
Terminals at Morehead City. 

J. N. Pease & Company of Charlotte, N. C. was se- 
lected as engineer for the construction of the dock ex- 
tension planned for Wilmington and Henry M. von 
Oesen was selected as engineer for transit shed con- 
struction and railroad and road work planned for the 
State Docks. 

The dock extension is required by the increasing 
number of vessels calling at the Docks. Several times 
ships have been turned away for lack of space and many 
ships have been kept waiting, anchored in the river, 
because of inadequate space. The new extension work 

The new fumigation plant at Morehead City Ocean Ter- 
minals, completed during the last year, offers a vital service 
to tobacco shippers. 



will probably begin the end of 1957 and be completed 
by the end of 1958. 

The new transit shed structure is necessary be- 
cause of the limited space now available for cargo to 
be assembled prior to shipment. Railroad and road 
work is required by additional business using these fa- 
cilities, both for additions and betterments. 

Architect-Engineer for construction of a new ware- 
house at Morehead City Ocean Terminals is A. J. Max- 
well, of Goldsboro, North Carolina. The warehouse is 
expected to add approximately 100,000 square feet of 
additional storage space to the facilities at the port. 

Approximately $800,000 will be spent at the More- 
head City Ocean Terminal and in the neighborhood of 
$2,600,000 at the State Docks in Wilmington. 

This new steel transit shed gives the Morehead City port 
40,000 square feet of additional storage space for transit car- 
goes. Completed in 1956. 





Above left: The HOPEV1LLE prepares to take on tobacco. 
Above center: Tobacco hogsheads are hoisted onto the ship. 

Above right: One of the two new gantry cranes in operation 
at Wilmington State Docks. This one is loading scrap metal. 

At right: Woodpulp ready for shipment from Wilmington 
State Docks. 



m PORTS 



Cases of tea arrive at 

Wilmington via 

the STEEL MAKER 

from across the sea. 



ydL«£- 





WILMINGTON 



N. C. STATE DOCKS, Philip L. Sullivan, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing three 500-foot vessels simultaneously, 
with depth of 32 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 
square feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

OPEN STORAGE : Three acres of paved open storage, 
easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron; also depressed tracks at 
rear of transit sheds and warehouse, entire length. 
Storage yard on property for 240 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes 
now in operation. 



One 3 5-ton locomotive crane and one 25-ton loco- 
motive crane. 
Two Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of 
various sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 
straddle trucks. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck clocks 
for loading and unloading at the transit sheds and 
warehouse: ramps for easy access into sheds and 
warehouses; portable side and end loading ramps for 
rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumigation 
plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. Export crat- 
ing service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Seaboard 
Air Line Railroad Companies and numerous highway 
motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Securitv force on duty at all times. 



**T^&* 




MOREHEAD CITY 



N. C. OCEAN TERMINALS, J. D. Holt, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 2,5 50 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petro- 
leum tanker, with a depth of 30 feet at mean low 
water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60,000 square 
feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinklers. 

One transit shed, 32,000 square feet, constructed of 
galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 
A third transit shed, the newest, is of pre-fabricated 
steel construction with sprinklers and has capacity 
of 40,000 square feet. 

WAREHOUSES: Two storage warehouses, totaling 
88,000 square feet, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: A large open storage area is avail- 
able. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. At- 
lantic and East Carolina Railway freight car storage 
yard adjacent to Port property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 

detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for lull palletization of 
cargoes. 

Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Equipment For the loading ol 

grain in ships or barges available. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks for 

loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easj access into transit sheds and 
warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Up-to-date fumigation plant of most 
modem concrete and steel construction is now in 
operation. I arge single ( lumber is of latest design. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supph .it shipside. Served h\ 
Atlantic and East Carolina Railway Co. One inter- 
state true k line on property . and sen ed b\ numerous 
highwaj motor transportation companies. 

SI CI RITY: Security force on duh at all times. 



n 




STOCKHOLM RETURNS 
TO WILMINGTON 

Plans were announced during the summer for two 
medical seminar cruises to originate in Wilmington. 

The first cruise, under the sponsorship of Jefferson 
Medical College of Philadelphia, will begin November 
9th and last 1 3 days. Stops will be made at Havana, 
Cape Hatien, San Juan, Guadaloupe, Antigua, and St. 
Thomas. 

The second cruise, which starts November 30 and 
lasts for six days, will be sponsored by the University 
of Maryland Medical School. Stops will be made at Ha- 
vana and Nassau. 

Both cruises will be made on the Swedish Luxury 
liner, M. S. STOCKHOLM, which has been sailing 
from North Carolina ports since 1954. 



MORE CRUISES SET FOR WILMINGTON 



Governor Luther H. Hodges was notified in late July 
that the Port of Wilmington has been selected to bring 
the flag ship of the AROSA Line Fleet, the new M. V. 
AROSA SKY, for two 14-and 15-day-long cruises to the 
West Indies and South America. The notification was 
received from Mr. John E. Smith, Jr., of Washington, 
D. C, who is piesident of the Caribbean Cruise Lines, 
and who stated that Wilmington had been selected over 
Charleston, Savannah and Norfolk because of the in- 
terest shown in having these cruises originate from a 
North Carolina port. 

The AROSA SKY is a 20,000 ton luxury liner, 
manned by a Swiss crew and equipped with the finest 
passenger accomodations. This will be the first season 
for the vessel to be cruising from U. S. A. ports. 



Mr. Smith said, in his letter to Governor Hodges, 
"With the tremendous increase in population and 
wealth of your progressive State of North Carolina, we 
feel that we should bring in vessels to serve your state 
and through your ports the entire South, instead of hav- 
ing your citizens travel hundreds and hundreds of miles 
to distant ports to enjoy this most relaxing of all vaca- 
tions, a luxury liner cruise." 

Mr. Smith has extended an invitation for Governor 
and Mrs. Hodges to make the first cruise from Wilming- 
ton which departs on January 9 and covers 5,880 miles 
of cruising, visiting Havana, Panama Canal, Curacao, 
Trinidad, Martinque and other ports. The ship will re- 
turn to Wilmington on January 23. 

Reservations for the cruises will be handled through 
any travel agency. 



}j SITU! Mjl[ AMI lUlNJElSI 



India, Pakistan, Ceylon 
Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq 
Thailand, Burma 
Hawaiian Islands 
Malaya, Philippines 

Indonesia, Cambodia, Laos, Viet Nam 
Alexandria, Lebanon, Red Sea 
Near and Middle East 

Wilmington Agents 

Wilmington Shipping Co. 

TeL Wilmington RO 2-3381 



PROVISIONS, DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative oi 
Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Socony-Vacuum Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



WILMINGTON: OFFICE RO 2-3327 - RES. RO 3-2893 

niNM^RODUCF 

FROZEN FOOD CO. S 

WHOLESALE 

Ship Chandlery Division 
Provisions — Deck and Engine Supplies 

JIMMY BATUYIOS 

P. O. Box 1676 121 Hanover St. 

WILMINGTON. N. C. 

Serving Wilmington and Morehead City 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY. NORTH CAROLINA 

P. O. BOX 249 
TELEPHONES 6-4651 & 6-4652 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 

Peter B. Ruffin 

President 

W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 

Wade H. Pierce 

Assistant Secretary 



William T. Davies 

Manager 

W. D. Williams 

Secretary 

I. P. Wilson 

Treasurer 

Lemuel L. Doss, Jr. 

Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board freight Forwarder Registration No. 37G 



HEIDE AND CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 



yo's AGe- v 



WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Cable Address 

"HEIDE" WILMINGTON-CAROLINA 

Telephone RO 3-5161 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 223 




READY TO SERVE . . . 

Your Port Of Wilmington Needs 

In every phase of the agricultural and 
industrial development of North Caro- 
lina, this bank has been an important 
factor. 

It has consistently cooperated with the 
grower, the manufacturer, the shipper 
and the merchant, helping to make 
North Carolina the prosperous, progres- 
sive State that it is. 

THE 

WILMINGTON SAVINGS AND 

TRUST COMPANY 

"NORTH CAROLINA'S PORT BANK" 

COMMERCIAL • TRUST • SAVINGS 

Established 1888 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Cer; 
Member Federal Res 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

P. O. BOX 1619 

WILMINGTON. N. C. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE LIBRARY 
RALEIGH, N.C. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. Postage 

PAI D 

Wilmington, N. C. 
Permit No. 225 



FORM 3547 REQUESTED 



Hulls 


Cargoes 


Yachts 


P. O. BOX 897^^j 
RO 2-7721 ^^^ 


^Hnsurance v 


^J^, ESTABLISHED 
^^ 1878 


P> 

All Other 


otection & Indemnii 
Marine & Overseas 


y 

Coverages 



SHIP LAUNDRY 

AND DRY CLEANING 

One Day Service 

IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 
CLEANERS, INC. 

FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE RO 2-6651 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of 

Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and Bridges and 

Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART. (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK, N. Y. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE — WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 

(iRKKNHEAKT is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and to 

abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, dolphins, 

rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State docks 
at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 



DESIGNERS & 
BUILDERS 

FLOATING CRANES 

TUGS • BARGES 

DREDGES • FLOATING 

INDUSTRIAL PLANTS 




Ocean Steamship Terminals 



TRAVELING GANTRIES 
WHIRLY CRANES 



COMPANY. INC. 



P. O. Box 647, Savannah, Ga. 



FROM PORT TO PORTAL 
—BY TRUCK! 

CLEVELAND 486 MILES 
CHICAGO 735 AMIES • . PITTSBURGH 422 MILES 

NEW YORK 49 MILES 
LOUISVILLE 381 MILES 




ATLANTA 210 MILES 



JACKSONVILLE 400 MILES 

All of North Carolina — and the nation — is on the 
main line by truck. In 1800 North Carolina com- 
munities and 7 counties, trucks are the only freight 
transportation. Truck transportation places 80 mil- 
lion people and 7 of America's 12 largest cities within 
less than a day's haul of North Carolina borders. 

NORTH CAROLINA 
MOTOR CARRIERS ASSOCIATION, Inc. 

Trucking Industry Building, Raleigh, N. C. 



A ^H North C .xanr 




&b6£ CaAjotitao 



II ii 



SPRING 1958 




W> 



1 




•-.iff-' 




•"•T."" 



o*™4<, MOREHEAD CITY 




WILMINGTON *^?«SS* 









HEIDE & CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 



v oVO's ^s Ncy 




Cable Address 

'HEIDE" MOREHEADCITY-CAROLINA 

Telephone 
6-5080 or 6-3652 



R. L. HICKS, Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 

W. D. WILLIAMS 

Secretary 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Assistant Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Vice-President 

J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 

LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Company 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 1809 
Telephone RO 2-3381 



Cable Address 
WILSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT 

INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



SOUTH ATLANTIC LINE 

Regular service between North Carolina Ports and Ireland, United 
Kingdom, and North Continental Europe will call at Baltic and 
Scandinavian ports when sufficient cargo offers. 




AMERICAN PIONEER LINE 

South Atlantic Ports direct to Honolulu, Yokahoma, Manila, Keev- 
ing, Kobe and other Far East Ports. 

SOUTH ATLANTIC LINE 

Wilmington Agent — Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Phone RO 2-3381 

AMERICAN PIONEER LINE 

Wilmington Agent— Heide & Co. — Phone RO 3-5161 

UNITED STATES LINES CO. 

NEW YORK 4. N. Y. DIGBY 4-5800 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 



Spring, 19 58 



Vol. IV, No. 1 



General Offices 
Drawer 1619, Wilmington 

Executive Offices 

215-219 Education Building 

Raleigh, N. C. 

MEMBERS OE THE BOARD 

JOHN M. REEVES, Chairman 

WILLIAM G. CLARK, JR., 
Vice-Chairman 

COLLIER COBB, JR. 

KIRKWOOD F. ADAMS 

ROBERT L. EICHELBERGER 

CHARLES D. GRAY 

EARL N. PHILLIPS 

J. ED KIRK, Secretary-Treasurer 

E. E. LEE, JR., Acting Director 

II. C. JACKSON, Traffic Manager 

R. A. DeVANE, Assistant Treasurer 

W. W. WILLSON, Public Relations 
Director 

NEW YORK OFFICE 

39 Broadway, Wing 618 
New York 6, N. Y. 

BOwling Green 9-8389 
TWX: NY 1-4414 

WILLIAM S. CHILDRESS 

New York Representative 

WILMINGTON OFFICE 

N. C. State Docks 

P. O. Box 1619 — Telephone 

ROgcr 3-1622 

TWX: WM 77 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN 

Operations Manager 

MOREIIEAD CITY OFFICE 

N. C. Ocean Terminals 
P. O. Box 14 5— Telephone 6-3159 
TWX: Morehead City, N. C. 8782 

W. H. 1 1111 DFR1CHS 
Acting Operations Manager 



SELL YOUR STATE PORTS 

This magazine is intended to he read by at least ten people. 
Please pass it on when you are through. 



CONTENTS 



What They Say 2 



New Board Is Named 



Babcock and Wilcox . . . Shipper 



Tobacco Exports Increase Tremendously . 8 



Luxury Liners Use Port as Cruise Base 10 



Heaving A Line 12 



Southern Acquires A&EC 



1 J . 



Port Facilities — Wilmington 14 



Port Facilities — Morehead City 



Shipping Sets New Record in 195' 



15 



16 



COM R 

The MY Stockholm, luxury liner that has become a regular cruise ship 
from North Carolina, was caught in thi* striking photograph iu*t prior to 
one i»/ the three fall nips to the Caribbean from Y. C. Statt Docks in 
Wilmington in December. The Swedish-American vessel has .i/;<./.h /■< < pi 
booked for three cruises again next fall. 



WHAT THEY SAY 



■fresh Ofar^ &Mt C5tate J^orts 



One thing can be said for sure about the 
new State Ports Authority named Tuesday 
by Governor Hodges: It has a trying yet ex- 
tremely important job. 

The authority's difficulties stem mainly 
from the fact that it is charged with de- 
velopment and operation of two ports. Nat- 
urally there has been, is and will be rivalry 
and jealousy between Wilmington and More- 
head City, a competition not only for busi- 
ness but for state appropriations and sup- 
port. Distinct advantages would be gained 
from concentration upon one port. But over 
against these advantages is the reasonable 
conclusion that two ports can be expected to 
handle a greater volume of tonnage, between 
them, than one port could. 

Whatever may be said now, the state is 
committed to two ports, with a substantial 
investment in each of them. Thus the re- 
sponsibility of the SPA and its executive di- 
rector, admittedly caught in a squeeze, is 
to maintain a state-wide perspective and to 
make the most of potentialities at both More- 
head City and Wilmington. Both have made 
marked progress but their potential is far 
from attained. 

As in the case of the State Highway Com- 
mission, Governor Hodges came to the stud- 
ied conclusion that the ports situation was 
such that an entirely new authority was nec- 
essary for a fresh start and a different ap- 
proach. The Governor voiced particular con- 
cern over the SPA's public relations, which 
we take to include selling these facilities to 
the shipping lines and to Tar Heel business 
and industry. The personnel of the new au- 
thority indicates that particular attention was 
paid to selling ability in their selection. 
Members come not from the ports areas but 
from upstate communities where it is essen- 
tial that good will and greater utilization of 
both the Wilmington and Morehead City 
facilities be preached and attained. 

In development and operation of both 
ports, it must be recognized that Wilmington 
ties in with industrial development of the en- 
tire southeastern part of the state and the 
lower Cape Fear basin and that Morehead 
City, in turn, is likely to have greater usage 



by the military, in view of its proximity to 
Camp Lejeune, and benefits from direct rail 
connection with the populous Piedmont and 
even the mountain area through the South- 
ern Railway's recent acquisition of the A. 
and E. C. We have no doubt that reaction 
to the Buckley Report and events which have 
occurred since its revelation had large part 
in building up the problem. 

Indicated removal of SPA headquarters 
from Wilmington to Raleigh is obviously part 
of the effort to end interport rivalry and dis- 
solve the idea that either state port has ad- 
ministrative advantage over the other. From 
one angle it does appear that the Raleigh 
transfer would take the executive director's 
office quite far from the base of the opera- 
tions with which it is charged. But distance 
means less and less these days. Each port has 
its own manager, under the executive direc- 
tor and the policy-making authority; actual 
operating details will presumably be left to 
him, within prescribed policy confines; and 
the executive director, while entrusted with 
supervision and correlation, will be expected 
to concentrate upon developing business for 
both Morehead City and Wilmington and 
persuading shipping lines to make a North 
Carolina port of call. 

We entrust that everybody concerned will 
realize that primary responsibility is to de- 
velop the potentialities of the two ports and 
to envision the interest and advancement of 
the State of North Carolina rather than the 
narrower gains for any given community. 
The Governor faced a tough decision; he 
should be given credit for making that de- 
cision courageously and in a manner which 
he deemed necessary to remedy a bad situa- 
tion and assure richer dividends from funds 
which the state as a whole has poured into 
port developments. 

North Carolina has two well-developed 
ports; the challenge is to get more shippers 
to use them. This goal is not to be attained 
by Morehead City's and Wilmington's firing 
away at one another. 

Editorial Reprinted from The Greensboro 
Daily News, November 4, 1957. 




Supreme Court Justice William Rodman gives oath of office to the 
new State Ports Authority in ceremonies at Raleigh, November 12. 



...TOURS STATE FACILITIES 



Governor Luther Hodges appointed a new State 
Ports Authority on Nov. 5, 1957, and attended the 
swearing-in ceremonies in the Hall of the House a 
week later. At the organizational meeting of the new 
Board, John Mercer Reeves of Pinehurst was selected 
chairman and William Grimes Clark, Jr., of Tarboro 
was picked as vice-chairman. Collier Cobb, Jr., Chapel 
Hill, was named as the third member of the executive 
committee inasmuch as Edgar Kirk, assistant director 
of the Department of Conservation and Development 
was appointed secretary-treasurer of the new Authority. 

Governor Hodges outlined a five-point program for 
the new Board: objectivity, public relations, end of 
inter-port squabbles, increased tonnages, and a long- 
range program. 

Immediately after their initial meeting, the mem- 
bers decided to visit Southport, Wilmington and More- 
head City to inspect the facilities at the three natural 
harbors under their jurisdiction. Although there are 



not yet any State-owned docks at Southport, the law 
establishing the SPA authorized the Board to develop 
that coastal town's dock facilities if and when there 
was recognized need. 

The Board was greeted at each port by a delegation 
of civic leaders and businessmen interested in the de- 
velopment of their respective communities. The visits 
included both formal and informal dinners, tours, re- 
ceptions and, of course, inspection of State-owned 
docks in Wilmington and Morchead City. 

At the second Board meeting, held in Pinehurst Dec. 
3, the SPA ordered that the offices of the executive di- 
rector and those of the solicitation ami public relations 
departments be moved to Raleigh. It also named II. 
Lee, Jr., director of commerce and traffic, acting director 
until a new director could be named, and moved Walter 
I'ricderichs up to acting operations manager of the 
docks at Morehead City in place of J. D. Holt. 




The new Board hears Colonel Heiss, commanding officer of Sunny Point Army Terminal, explain the role 
of the Army's docks on the Cape Fear River. 



The third meeting of the new Board was held in Ra- 
leigh Dec. 1 7 and was largely a routine business ses- 
sion. 

Six of the seven new members of the SPA are North 
Carolina businessmen; the seventh is General Robert 
Eichelberger whose record in the Pacific theatre during 
World War II is still one of the most talked of subjects 
in military annals. 

Following is a brief biography of each new Board 
member: 

John Mercer Reeves, Pinehurst, is chairman of the 
Board of Reeves Brothers, Inc., New York City. He is 
a native of Surry County, and was educated at the Mt. 
Airy schools, Oak Ridge Preparatory school and re- 
ceived his A.B. at the University of North Carolina, 
1910. He also did graduate work at the University of 
Chicago and textiles at North Carolina State College. 
He has been awarded an L.L.D. from American Uni- 
versity at Washington, D. C. and the same degree from 
Wofford College, Spartanburg, South Carolina. Mr. 
Reeves is former president of the Board of Education of 
Summit, New Jersey, and serves as a member of the 
Board of Directors of the Greater New York Councils, 
Boy Scouts of America, and as a member of the Board 
of Trustees of American University and Centenary 
College for Women at Hackettstown, New Jersey. He 
has been active in YMCA work also. He is married to 
Virginia McKenzie Reeves and they have three children, 
Virginia C, Ann C, and Emily M. 

William Grimes Clark, Jr., Tarboro, is president of 
the Tarboro Savings and Loan Association, and Clark 
Industries, Inc. He also serves as director of Jefferson 
Standard Life Insurance Company, Security National 



Bank and Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Born in Maryland, Mr. Clark was graduated from Tar- 
boro high school, attended Augusta Military school and 
the University of North Carolina. He is chairman of 
the Edgecombe County Democratic Executive Commit- 
tee, and formerly served as a member of the Town of 
Tarboro Board of Aldermen. He has participated in 
civic affairs. He and his wife, Frances, have two child- 
ren, a daughter, Mrs. Ruth Clark Schultz, and a son, 
William Grimes Clark III. 

Collier Cobb, Jr., Chapel Hill, is president of Service 
Insurance and Realty Company, and is chairman of 
the board, Bank of Chapel Hill. A native of Lilesville, 
Mr. Cobb received an A.B. at the University of North 
Carolina, 1914 and a B.S. in Civil Engineering at the 
same institution, 1915. A veteran in public service, he 
has served as a member of the Orange County Board of 
Commissioners for 1 4 years, with 1 years of this time 
as chairman of the board. He has been a member of the 
Chapel Hill School Board and the Chapel Hill Planning 
Board for six years. He and Mrs. Cobb, the former 
Emma Estes, have a daughter, Nancy Estes Cobb, and 
a son, Collier Cobb III. 

Kirkwood Floyd Adams, Roanoke Rapids, has been 
in the paper manufacturing and selling business since 
1926, and is now executive vice-president of the Hali- 
fax Paper Company. Mr. Adams attended Virginia 
Military Institute for two years, and then was graduat- 
ed from the University of Virginia with a B.S. in com- 
merce and science. He has been active in many civic, 
church, trade and fraternal organizations, including the 
Roanoke River Basin Association, American Red Cross, 
Kiwanis, Executives Club, Roanoke Rapids Library, 
American Pulpwood Association, American Manage- 
ment Association and others. 




On their initial tour of the ports, the SPA members took a ride up the Cape Fear aboard an Army craft 
and inspected the vast resources of North Carolina's deep water terminals. 



Robert L. Eichelberger, Biltmore Forest, has acted as 
advisor on Far Eastern affairs to the Secretary of the 
Army, and has written a book, "Jungle Road to Tokyo," 
and numerous articles for national periodicals. During 
World War II he commanded the Eighth Army on the 
drive from Australia to Japan, 1942-45. He served as 
commander of ground forces during the first three years 
of occupation of Japan and was second in command 
to General Douglas MacArthur. A native of Urbana, 
Ohio, the General attended Ohio State University for 
two years before entering West Point, where he was 
graduated in 1909. He was a distinguished graduate of 
the Command and Gradu, te Staff School, 1926; Army 
War College, 1930; and served as Superintendent of 
the U. S. Military Academy, 1940-42. Since retiring to 
Biltmore Forest, he has been active in civic and 
church affairs. Mrs. Eichelberger is the former Emma 
Gudger of Asheville. 

Charles Dowel Gray, Gastonia, is president of Gray 
and Daniel, Inc., selling agents for cotton mills, 
and is also a director of Textiles, Inc., a large chain of 
textile manufacturing plants. He is the son of George 
Alexander Gray, textile pioneer, who started the first 
textile mill in Gaston County. A native of Gastonia, Mr. 
Gray was educated at Trinity .College and Washington 
and Fee University. He has been very active in civic 
and community activities and has served as County 
Chairman of the U. S. Savings Bond Committee since 
1942. He is past president of Kiwanis in Gastonia, a 
member of the Advisory Board of the Gaston Memorial 
Hospital School for Nursing, a member of the Advisory 
Council for Belmont Abbey College, president of the 



Gaston County Tuberculosis Association. He and his 
wife, the former Clarice Poff, have four children, 
Charles D. Gray, Jr., David G. Gray, Mrs. Betty Gray 
Summey, all of Gastonia and Mrs. Catherine Gray 
Jackson, Wilson Point, Connecticut. 

Earl Nor fleet Phillips, High Point, is chairman of 
board of Phillips-Davis, Inc., and National Springs, 
Inc., and serves as president of Highland Container Co., 
and Electric Supply, Inc. A native of Crewe, Va., Mr. 
Phillips attended William and Mary College and Wash- 
ington and Fee University. He served as a member of 
the High Point City Council from 193 5-1941, and 
was Mayor of High Point for two terms, 194 5-49. Ac- 
tive in civic and political affairs, he has worked in the 
Chamber of Commerce, Rotary, YMCA and on other 
community projects, and also served as a delegate to 
the Democratic National Convention in 1944 and 
1948. He is married to Lillian Jordan Phillips and they 
have two sons, Earl Norllcet Phillips, Jr., and Stanley 
Davis Phillips. 

/. Edgar Kirk, assistant director of the Department 
of Conservation and Development, serves the board as 
secretary-treasurer. The son of a Baptist minister, Mr. 
Kirk is a native Tar Heel and has lived in many cities 
and towns in the state. He is a graduate of Wake Forest 
college and has had many years of advertising and 
news experience. Prior to joining C and D, he was news 
director of radio station WPTK Raleigh. A veteran of 
World War IF he holds a -reserve commission in the 
Air Force with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Mr. 
Kirk, his wife, the former Miss Phyllis Troughton. and 
their three children reside in the Brookhaven section 
of Raleigh. 









- 



Heading for Japan aboard the Mitsui Line are these boiler parts which will soon become a part of the giant Chiba 
Thermal Power Station in Tokyo. 

BABCOCK AND WILCOX . . . SHIPPER 




Babcock and Wilcox is the world's largest manufac- 
turer and fabricator of boilers, tubing and refractories. 
For nearly 100 years it has been a leader in its field. 
Therefore, B&W is a major exporter with units being 
shipped all over the world. 

Recently the Wilmington plant of Babcock and Wil- 
cox built and shipped over 1,600 tons of assembled 
units and fabricated components through State Ports 
Authority facilities in Wilmington. 

First unit to move was a waste-heat boiler to Vene- 
zuela aboard Royal Netherlands Lines. Inasmuch as 
regular service is maintained to and from Wilmington 
by the steamship company, the movement was made 
with ease. 

Then in November the first of two shipments total- 
ing 1,150 tons, the largest movement of locally produc- 



Shown at the left are boiler parts, built by Tar Heels, being 
stowed aboard a ship for South America. 




This waste-heat boiler from the Wil- 
mington Works of Babcock and Wilcox 
was sent to Venezuela via Royal 
Netherlands lines and is a part of the regu- 
lar run service available through State 
Ports in North Carolina. 



The shipment to Japan, part of 
ivhich is shown above, was 
the largest movement of lo- 
cally-produced equipment ever 
made from North Carolina's 
State Docks in Wilmington. 
The shipment totalled 
1,150 tons. 




ed equipment ever made from the port of Wilmington, 
left aboard the Mitsui Line's "Hoeisan Maru" for Tokyo, 
Japan. 

Weighing more than 450 tons, the initial load was 
composed of headers, sections and tubes fabricated by 
B&W's Wilmington Works for a boiler being erected at 
the Tokyo Electric Power Co. Chiba Thermal Power 
Station in Tokyo. The second shipment was made 
December 2 aboard the Meirinsan Maru. 

Purchased for the utility station by International 
General Electric Company, prime contractor for the 
project, to serve a 175 megawatt turbine generator 
being supplied by IGF, the boiler has a designed steam- 
ing capacity of 1,300,000 pounds per hour, the highest 
of any boiler ever exported by B&W. It will add 17 5,- 
000 kilowatts to the utility's system, which serves an 
80 mile radius around Tokyo and Yokohama. Designed 
for a pressure of 2,712 pounds per square inch, the 



boiler will operate with a steam pressure of 2,4 75 psi 
at the superheater outlet and a temperature of 1,060 
degrees Fahrenheit. In addition, it will have an hourly 
reheat steam flow of 1,100,000 pounds at a pressure of 
475 psi and a temperature of 1,010 degrees F. Depend- 
ing upon local Japanese fuel conditions, the unit will 
burn either 201,000 pounds of pulverized coal or 71,- 
200 pounds of oil per hour. 

B&W has also contracted to furnish the steam drum, 
superheaters and various small parts for a second boiler 
being built by Babcock-Hitachi, of Japan, for the Chiba 
Thermal Power Station, Identical in every respect to the 
first unit, which is expected to enter service late next 
year, this second boiler will begin operation in 1959. 
Gilbert Associates, Inc., consulting engineers of Read- 
ing, Pa., were engaged bv the prime contractor. Inter- 
national General Flectric, to engineer and design the 
project. 




TOBACCO EXPORTS 

INCREASE 

TREMENDOUSLY 



Although the national tobacco export picture has 
been reported declining during 1957, shipments 
through North Carolina State Port facilities have been 
showing a remarkable increase. 

Latest figures available, while subject to revision, in- 
dicate tobacco exports through N. C. Ocean Terminals 
at Morehead City increased by over 44%! Increased 
tonnages through N. C. State Docks at Wilmington 
were up by at least 39% for the same period. 

Exports through both ports during 1957 were set at 
36,183 tons as against 25,974 tons for 1956 — an 
increase of 10,209 tons. 

Tonnages at the SPA docks in Morehead City jump- 
ed from 10,477 in 1956 to 15,162 in 1957. For the 
same period, tonnages through the State Docks in Wil- 
mington climbed from 15,497 to 21,021. Combined 
tonnage increase of flue-cured tobacco exports through 
State-owned docks for the year were set at 39.3%. 

Perhaps one incident that occurred recently indicates 
why tobacco is moving in ever-increasing amounts 
through Tar Heel ports. A major exporter consigned a 
large shipment through Ocean Terminals. En route to 



the Morehead City docks, some of the tobacco was 
caught in the rain and was slightly damaged. As is 
customary, the new tobacco was inspected the minute 
it arrived at the State Ports facility, the damaged tobacco 
isolated and the shipper was notified. 

Naturally that shipper was pleased by the prompt 
attention (and protection) he received. "You do not 
get such service except at Morehead City," he later 
boasted. 

Thus the handling of tobacco in Tar Heel ports — 
where men know best how to handle the valuable cargo 
— must be considered a major factor in the tremendous 
increase of export shipments noted during the past 
year. Call it "service with a sensitive touch," call it 
"good operations," or call it "common sense," the fact is 
North Carolinians who grow, barn, auction, re-dry and 
process tobacco best also are the best equipped to handle 
the Golden Weed for export. 

And any time export tonnages jump by 40% in one 
year, it is proof that tobacco receives "the care you would 
give it" when it moves through the Tar Heel ports of 
Morehead City and Wilmington. 




Typical scene at Tar Heel ports 
— this one at Morchcad ( it\. 
Tobacco being exported through 
SPA facilities jumped by 40 per 
cent during J 957. 



Checking loading plans are Capt. 
J. W. van der Sluys of the S. 
S. Sloterdyk, seated, and Larry 
Platted, representative of Hol- 
land-America Lines which 
maintains regular service be- 
tween Morchcad City and the 
Continent. 





LUXURY LINERS USE PORT 
AS CRUISE BASE 



The development of North Carolina's ports as a 
base for cruise operations during fall and winter months 
has been little short of phenomenal as noted by the suc- 
cessful bookings by travel agencies. This past fall the 
Swedish-American Line's MV Stockholm was a sell-out 
on three Caribbean trips out of Wilmington. After the 
final cruise on Dec. 6, Allen Travel Service announced 
it had already scheduled sailings for October and No- 
vember of 1958. 

Then on January 9 of this year the MV Arosa Sky, a 
$20,000,000 luxury ship of the Arosa Line, made Wil- 
mington a port of call for a two-week trip to South 
America and the Caribbean. Again on March 17, an- 
other 14-day cruise aboard the Arosa Sky is scheduled 
from Wilmington. If the Arosa Line's cruises prove to 
be as successful as anticipated, there is a strong possi- 
bility that additional bookings will be made for the 
winter of 1959 and with one of the cruises using More- 
head City as port of call instead of Wilmington. 

The MV Stockholm, built in 1948, is on regular 
trans-Atlantic service during summer months and has 
been on the cruise circuit during the fall and winter for 
several years. In fact, cruises from North Carolina 
originated at the SPA terminal in Morehead City in 
1954 and since then the special outings have been 
known as the "Tar Heel Cruises." Many conventions 
and medical seminars have been held aboard the 
Stockholm by North Carolina business and medical 
groups since the origin of the cruises. 

Vital statistics of the Stockholm: 12,165 tons, 524 
feet in length, 69-foot beam, draws 25 feet, and carries 
about 400 passengers on cruises. 

The Arosa Sky was built in 1949 and is listed at 
17,321 tons. She is the largest ship ever to use SPA 
facilities, being just shy of 600 feet in length and 75- 
feet wide. She draws 27 feet of water and carries about 
450 cruise passengers. 

The Arosa Sky's tours are under the direction of Ca- 
ribbean Cruise Lines, Washington, D. C. 



10 




Above: MV Arosa Sky, flag ship of the Arosa Lines, is the 
largest sliip ever to put in at SPA facilities in North Carolina. 
Among the passengers on her Jan. 9 cruise to South America 
were Gov. and Mrs. Lather H. Hodges. 

Below left: The MV Stockholm returned from her last "Tar 
Heel Cruise" on Dec. 6. It teas announced immediately after 



that there would he three more cruises next fall aboard the 
Swedish-America): liner. 

Below right: Capt. C. \V. Jonsson, master nf the Stockholm, 
talks over cruise itinerary with Mr. and Mrs. John Harden of 
Greensboro. Mr. Harden is vice-president of Burlington In- 
dustries, Inc. 




11 




Every organization, we suppose, gets its share of re- 
quests for samples. We were not particularly disturbed, 
therefore, in the batch of requests for literature and in- 
formation from school children throughout the State 
to receive the request by a sixth grader in San ford who 
wrote: "Please send me the state ports." Freight rates 
being what they are, we sent the lad only some material 
that could be entered as third class mail. 



The SPA Story is slowly but surely being spread. In 
the August edition of World Ports the lead article dealt 
with the expansion program now being carried on at 
the SPA facilities in Wilmington and Morehead City. 
In the November edition of the same magazine we had 
top billing on the cover with our scrap operation. Then 
on the cover of the Mariner for October, the Morehead 
City terminals were shown in color as a Holland-Ameri- 
ca ship was warped in. 



side. Just to keep the record straight, the SPA discover- 
ed that 334 cars had to be parked and guarded during 
the three Stockholm cruises and of those 334 cars, 
seven were found to have dead batteries and nine de- 
veloped flat tires. The SPA parked the cars, maintain- 
ed 24-hour watch over them, changed flat tires, et al. 
And if there is any additional doubt about confusion, 
no less than 2 1 pieces of luggage were left on the docks 
by forgetful tourists. One man managed to walk off the 
docks and head for home without any of his three suit- 
cases. He returned, needless to say. All other pieces of 
luggage were shipped express collect to their rightful 

owners. 

* * * 

Public Relations — a term often misunderstood or 
misrepresented — is best described by Clancy Dayhoff, 
PR director for the Port of Los Angeles. He says "Public 
relations serves the same purpose to a business as whisk- 
ers do to a cat in a dark room. 



General Robert Eichelberger, a new member of the 
Board, may be best known not for his march from 
Australia to Japan, but rather as the man who got 
Coach Earl (Red) Blaik to move from Dartmouth to 
West Point. The General recalls it took a lot of effort 
— even a trip to the White House — to get some 220- 
pound tackles admitted to the Military Academy. It 
seems the Surgeon General used to contend that a man 
six feet tall should weigh no more than 180 pounds 
and you just can't play Notre Dame when your line is 
featuring slim tackles and even slimmer guards. 



Cruise passengers may be excused for oversights be- 
cause they're headed to or are returning from pleasure 
jaunts and there is always plenty of excitement at dock- 




12 




SOUTHERN ACQUIRES A & E C 




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HARRY A. DcBUTTS 

President 
Southern Railway System 

The Southern Railway System purchased control of 
the Atlantic and East Coast Railway in September and 
thereby provided the port of Morehead City with a 
through cast-west trunk line by a major carrier. 

Harry A. DeButts, president of Southern, predicted a 
bright industrial and an equally bright shipping future 
for the eastern section of North Carolina now that his 
company has gained control of the lines running from 
Coldsboro to the coast: 

"Prior to our purchase of the A&EC we were particu- 
larly impressed with the future industrial potential of 



the A&EC area. Since that time there has been no rea- 
son to change this viewpoint and, in fact, we are even 
more optimistic than ever that industries will find in 
East Carolina the necessary requisites for successful 
operation. 

"We, of course, have a vital interest in promoting in- 
dustrial growth in this region, and we will cooperate 
fully with local and state development agencies and 
will make every other possible effort to further the de- 
velopment of the Port of Morehead City and to bring 
new industry into the A&EC area." 

Tar Heel reaction to the announcement of Southern's 
purchase was immediate and favorable. Governor Luth- 
er H. Hodges spoke for all when he said "I commend 
the Southern for its courage and leadership in taking 
this necessary step which I predict will bring a new daj 
and a new era to eastern North Carolina." 

The A&EC, affectionately called "The Old Mullet 
Line," was established 100 years ago with Morehead 
City its eastern terminus. Now that the line has been 
acquired by the Southern system, Morehead City will 
join New Orleans, Mobile, Jacksonville, Brunswick, 
Savannah, Charleston and Norfolk on the list of major 
ports being served by the railroad whose lines extend 
to St. Louis and Memphis. 




13 




WILMINGTON 



N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Philip L. Sullivan, Operations Manager 



Y\ HARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing three 500-foot vessels simultaneously, 
with depth of 32 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT -SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 
square feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

OPEN STORAGE : Three acres of paved open storage, 
easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron; also depressed tracks at 
rear of transit sheds and warehouse, entire length. 
Storage yard on property for 240 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes 
for heavy lifts, single or in tandem, and equipped 
for 80-inch magnet work and 2-yard bucket opera- 
tion. 



One 35-ton locomotive crane and one 25-ton loco- 
motive crane. 

Three Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of 
various sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton 
mobile crane. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at the transit sheds 
and warehouse; ramps for easy access into sheds 
and warehouses; portable side and end loading 
ramps for rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumiga- 
tion plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES : Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. Export crat- 
ing service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Seaboard 
Air Line Railroad Companies and numerous highway 
motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



14 




MOREHEAD CITY 



N. C. OCEAN TERMINALS 

W. H. Friederichs, Acting Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petro- 
leum tanker, with a depth of 30 feet at mean low 
water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry with sprinklers. 

One transit shed, 32,000 square feet, constructed 
of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 
A third transit shed, the newest, is of pre-fabricatcd 
steel construction with sprinklers and has capacity 
of 40,000 square feet. 

WAREHOUSES: Two storage warehouses, totaling 
88,000 square feet, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: A large open storage area is avail- 
able. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. At- 
lantic and East Carolina Railway freight car storage 
yard adjacent to Port property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palleti/ation of 
cargoes. 
Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Equipment For the loading „t 
grain in ships or barges available. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks un- 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware 
houses; ramps for easy access into transit sheds and 
warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Up-to-date fumigation plain of most 
modern concrete and steel construction is now in 
operation. Large single chamber is of latest design. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricitj and 1 cdcralb ap- 
proved potable water SUppl) .it shipside. Served b\ 
Atlantic and East Carolina Railway Co., a wholly- 
owned subsidiary of The Southern Railway System . 
One interstate truck line on property, and served b\ 
numerous highway motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



15 



SHIPPING 

SETS NEW RECORD 

IN 1957 

Traffic by commercial dry cargo ships at the State 
Ports increased greatly during 1957. When the SS 
American Miller docked at Wilmington on October 1, 
it became the 100th commercial ship of the year for 
State Docks. In all of 1956 only 98 commercial ves- 
sels called at the SPA facility in Wilmington. By the 
year's end, 160 ships had been at dock on the State- 
owned piers on the Cape Fear River. 

SPA officials have estimated that each ship leaves 
behind something in excess of $10,000 when it calls. 
Such items as provisioning, fuel, laundry, pilot fees, tug 
boat charges, wharfage and dockage are included in 
that figure. However, additional revenue is generated by 
each ship in the form of stevedoring cost, inland freight 
rates, agents' fees, insurance, etc., and add considerablv 
more to the total economic value of the SPA facilities. 

Virtually the same picture was developing at Ocean 
Terminals in Morehead City as was found in Wilming- 
ton. As of the first of October, 37 dry commercial cargo 
ships had called at that port — exactly the same num- 
ber as called for the entire year before. In other words, 
both SPA facilities were developing and growing in the 
race for water-borne general cargoes and, in the first 
three-quarters of 1957, had already reached the records 
set in 1956. 

Oil and oil products, principal cargo at Morehead 
City, remained fairly constant during the year, so the 
increased business there in 1957 was largely due to the 
emergence of Ocean Terminals as general cargo termi- 
nals is of special note. The year-end totals for Morehead 
indicate 58 dry cargo ships called during 1957 — an 
increase of 21 over 1956. 







Philip Sullivan, operations manager of N. C. State Docks in 
Wilmington greets Capt. Albert Hamann of the SS American 
Miller — the 100th ship to call at the Cape Fear terminals in 
1957. In all, 160 commercial ships put in during the year. 




I sthmian | i n e a 



India, Pakistan, Ceylon 
Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq 
Thailand, Burma 
Hawaiian Islands 
Malaya, Philippines 

Indonesia, Cambodia, Laos, Viet Nam 
Alexandria, Lebanon, Red Sea 
Near and Middle East 

Wilmington Agents 

Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Tel. Wilmington RO 2-3381 



PROVISIONS, DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 

International Paint 

Socony- Vacuum Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 
Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



WILMINGTON: OFFICE RO 2-3327 - RES. RO 3-2893 

OlMMYSwoouCF 

FROZEN FOOD CO. "s 

WHOLESALE 

Ship Chandlery Division 
Provisions — Deck and Engine Supplies 

JIMMY BATUYIOS 



P. O. Box 1676 



121 Hanover St. 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Serving Wilmington and Morehead City 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



P. o. 


BOX 


249 


TELEPHONES 6-4651 & 6-4652 


CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 




William T. Davies 

Manager 


Peter B. RuHin 

President 




W. D. Williams 

Secretary 


W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 




J. P. Wilson 

Treasurer 


Wade H. Pierce 

Assistant Secretary 




Lemuel L. Doss, Jr. 

Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board freight Forwarder Registration No. 37G 



HEIDE AND CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND 
LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 
SAMPLERS 

SWORN WEIGHERS 



pYtfs Ace^ 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Cable Address 

"HEIDE" WILMINGTON-CAROLINA 

Telephone RO 3-5161 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 223 



READY TO SERVE . . . 

Your Port Of Wilmington Needs 

In every phase of the agricultural and 
industrial development of North Caro- 
lina, this bank has been an important 
factor. 

It has consistently cooperated with the 
grower, the manufacturer, the shipper 
and the merchant, helping to make 
North Carolina the prosperous, progres- 
sive State that it is. 

THE 

WILMINGTON SAVINGS AND 

TRUST COMPANY 

"NORTH CAROLINA'S PORT BANK" 

COMMERCIAL • TRUST • SAVINGS 

Established 1888 

Wilmington, North Carolina 
Member Federal Deposit Insurancr 






N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

P. O. BOX 1619 

WILMINGTON. N. C. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. Postage 

PAI D 

Wilmington, N. C. 
Permit No. 225 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE LIBRARY 



RALEIGH, N.C 



FORM 3547 REQUESTED 



Hulls 



Cargoes 



Yachts 



P. O. BOX 897 
RO 2-7721 




ESTABLISHED 
1878 



Protection & Indemnity 
All Other Marine & Overseas Coverages 



SHIP LAUNDRY 

AND DRY CLEANING 

One Day Service 

• 

IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 
CLEANERS, INC. 

FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE RO 2-6651 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of 

Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and Bridges and 

Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK, N. Y. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE — WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 

GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and to 

abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, dolphins, 

rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State docks 
at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 




DESIGNERS & 
BUILDERS 

FLOATING CRANES 

TUGS • BARGES 

DREDGES • FLOATING 

INDUSTRIAL PLANTS 

TRAVELING GANTRIES 
WHIRLY CRANES 




Ocean Steamship Terminals 



P. O. Box 647, Savannah, Ga. 






r |f you've 

got it ... a truck 

brought it ! 




liitilllll 




YES— TO YOUR VERY DOOR. 



FROM SHIPSIDE 

To your very door 



BY TRUCK 



The N. C. Trucking Industry serves the fine North Carolina 
Ports. Trucks serve everyone — especially the more than 1800 
Tar Heel communities entirely dependent on Trucks for every- 
thing to eat, wear, use and sell. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Trucking Industry Building Raleigh, N. C. 



) I 

STBTE PORTS 



s^ 



**^U 



Uhrtrt 



Doc. 



WILMINGTON 




MOREHEAD CITY 




SUMMER 1958 



-> 



HEIDE AND CO.. INC 



STEAMSHIP AGENTS 



STEVEDORES 



SAMPLERS 



SWORN WEIGHERS 



v oVO'S AGe^ 




WILMINGTON, N. C. 

TELEPHONE ROger 3-5161 
And 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

TELEPHONE 6-5080 OR 6-3652 



PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 

W. D. WILLIAMS 

Secretary 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Assistant Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Vice-President 

I. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 

LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Company 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 1809 
Telephone RO 2-3381 



Cable Address 
WILSHIPCO 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT 

INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



SOUTH ATLANTIC LINE 

Regular service between North Carolina Ports and Ireland, United 
Kingdom, and North Continental Europe will call at Baltic and 
Scandinavian ports when sufficient cargo offers. 




AMERICAN PIONEER LINE 

South Atlantic Ports direct to Honolulu, Yokohama, 
Manila, Keelung, Kobe and other Far East ports. 

SOUTH ATLANTIC LINE 

Wilmington Agent — Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Phone RO 2-3381 

AMERICAN PIONEER LINE 

Wilmington Agent— Heide & Co. — Phone RO 3-5161 

UNITED STATES LINES CO. 

NEW YORK 4, N. Y. DIGBY 4-5800 




Executive Offices 

215-219 Education Building 

I\ (). Box 248 5 

Tel. TEmple 4-3611 Ext. 7335 

Raleigh, N. C. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

JOHN M. REEVES, Chairman 

WILLIAM G. CLARK, JR., 

V ice-Chairman 

COLLIER COBB, JR. 

KIRKWOOD F. ADAMS 

ROBLRT L. EICHELBERGER 

CHARLES D. GRAY 

EARL N. PHILLIPS 

J. ED KIRK, Secretary-Treasurer 



D. LEON WILLIAMS 

Executive Director 



E. E. LEE, JR., Director, 

Commerce & Traffic 

H. C. JACKSON, Traffic Manager 

R. A. DcVANE, Assistant Treasurer 

W. W. WILLSON, Public Relations 

Director 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
H. N. LARCOMBE, Representative 

NEW YORK OFFICE 

Room 1607, 32 Broadway 
New York 4, N. Y. 

BOwIing Green 9-8 389 

WILLIAM S. CHILDRESS 

New York Representative 

WILMINGTON OFFICE 

N. C. State Docks 

P. O. Box 1619 — Telephone 

ROger 3-1622 

TWX: WM 77 

PHILIP L. SULLIVAN 
Operations Manager 

MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

N. C. Ocean Terminals 
P. O. Box 145— Telephone 6-3159 
TWX: Morehead City, N. C. 8782 

W. II. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 



Summer, 19 58 



Vol. IV, No. 2 



W. \V. WTii son, / ditor 

Ka'i ii mum: Jjvir.s, Associate I'tlitor 



SELL YOUR STATE PORTS 

This magazine is intended to he read by at least ten people. 
Please pass it on when you are through. 



CONTENTS 

What They Say...... .... 2 

Cruise Season Ends 3 

Burlington . . . Shipper 4 

Spud Farmers Benefit, Too 6 

Record Cotton Shipment Arrives 8 

Personalities 1 

New Director Assumes Post 12 

Heaving A Line 1 3 

New Forwarding Corporation 13 

Port Facilities, Wilmington 14 

Port Facilities, Morehead City 15 

Those Signs Mean Something __ ._ 16 

Arabian Horses Arrive In U. S 16 



COVER 

Ore has become an important import for North Carolina's port terminals. 
Here two-yard buckets dip into the hold of the IHV KONGSHOLM, a new 

ship which was making her initial cargo-earning trip when she called at 
State Docks. 



1 



What They Say 



<y~tow Jo (Explode <jVl\jths and ^L^iife <~7ndi 



ius 



try 



Violent . . . ornery . . . cantankerous . . . 
stubborn . . . narrow . . . trifling . . . mean 
. . . lazy. 

All of these epithets have been used at 
one time or another to describe that abomi- 
nable critter, "the typical southerner," in 
Yankee mythology. It is perhaps one of the 
lingering penalties for having been cheated 
out of victory in the Late Unpleasantness 
that Dixie is so maligned by anecdotists, epi- 
grammists and latter-day Reconstructionists. 
But the descriptive word that burns deepest 
is "lazy." 

The region has had its just share of hay- 
stack snoozers and swamp nappers in the 
dim and distant past when life was of a 
more lanquid design hereabouts. But all 
that ended abruptly when the hammering 
began on what the chamber of commerce 
secretaries like to call the New South. And 
who, pray, can doze with all that racket in 
the foreground? 

We have taken a turn or two at bat our- 
selves in attempting to belt a few of the 
gamier legends about life below the Mason- 
Dixon line. But we have never had as much 
success as G. Randolph Babcock enjoyed 
before Charlotte's Industrial Development 
Council. Mr. Babcock is a man who ought 
to know whereof he speaks. He is president 
of Pelton & Crane Co., a Detroit firm which 
moved South to Charlotte a few years ago 
— and not in search of lazy labor. 

Let's let Mr. Babcock speak for himself: 

"Despite the fact that the Civil War has 
been over foi almost a hundred years and 
just last week Richmond presented the keys 
to the city to U. S. Grant III, there is still a 
great deal of prejudice in the North toward 
the South. The best definition of prejudice 
I ever heard was 'being down on something 
you ain't up on.' We might as well face it. 
There are a lot of people in the North who 
just ain't up on what goes on in the South. 
Industrially speaking, their principal con- 
cern in this regard results from the popular 
misconception that southern workers are too 
slow and easy-going . . . They still believe 



that the skill and pace of the northern work- 
er is superior. They are ever so wrong on 
this score and I can prove it . . ." 

Prove it he did with actual statistics show- 
ing that his company's southern labor, out- 
produced Detroit labor to a startling degree. 
Direct labor costs of P & C plunged sharp- 
ly although its employes were actually paid 
more down South than they were in De- 
troit. 

As for the "allegedly slow-moving south- 
ern workers," Mr. Babcock added: 

"I have nothing but the highest praise for 
them. They learn readily, they appreciate 
their jobs and they are anxious to give a 
day's work for a day's pay. Within six 
months after our full work force was hired 
it was producing at a greater efficiency than 
we ever experienced in Detroit. In this con- 
nection, please bear in mind that the ma- 
jority of them were operating machines that 
they had never seen before and doing jobs 
completely foreign to most of them. . . . For 
whatever it may be worth to you, this ends 
the unsolicited testimonial of a satisfied 
customer." 

It will be worth a great deal to local in- 
dustry hunters if they add this unsolicited 
testimonial to their collection of lures. It 
effectively smashes a myth that has perhaps 
harmed the South more than many imagine. 

Too many of the South's salesmen .have, 
if they have mentioned labor at all, empha- 
sized "cheap labor." Some sections of Dixie 
may have such an advantage. But if so it is 
an ephemeral advantage and one that will 
tend to disappear as industrialization in- 
creases. The region's permanent advantage 
lies in the productivity of its labor rather 
than in its "cheapness." In the long run, 
"cheap labor" is likely to be inefficient labor, 
and therefore costly. 

As for "lazy labor," let's just have another 
look at that little old record— Mr. Bab- 
cock's record. 

Editorial Reprinted from The Charlotte 
News, Charlotte, N. C. 




, . 1 t 


i • jr-i *r-» n n n n n 


■ • 


• • 

















The sleek cruise ship Lines and a modern freighter arrives. This picture by Star-News reporter Jim Hardee 
typifies the increased activity at State-mined docks and emphasizes the growing importance oj the deep water 
ports to North Carolina's economy. 

CRUISE SEASON ENDS . . . ANOTHER STARTS SOON 



The MV AROSA SKY has completed its winter and 
spring cruises out of Wilmington with every success. 
Both cruises took passengers through the islands of the 
Caribbean, touched on South /American shores at sev- 
eral points, and returned to the State Docks two weeks 
later. 

A few of the spots encountered were Havana, Pana- 
ma Canal, Trinidad, LaGuaira and St. Thomas. At 
most of these places passengers disembarked for a few 
hours and looked around for souvenirs to bring home 
with them. 

The 17,321-ton \essel, sleek and white, is only nine 
years old this year. She is nearly 600 feet long, 75 feet 
wide and has a draft of 2 7 feet. She can carry approxi- 
mately 4 50 passengers per sailing and is the largest 
vessel ever to dock at the State facilities in Wilmington. 

Heading the list of passengers for one of the cruises 
were Governor and Mrs. Luther Hodges, who thorough- 
ly enjoyed their relaxation aboard ship. 

With the return of the AROSA SKY from the sec- 
ond cruise, Wilmington closed its cruise season until 
the fall of 1958. During the 1958-59 season, how- 
ever, the MS STOCKHOLM will visit Wilmington for 
3 cruises in late 1958, and it is expected that the 
AROSA SKY will visit Wilmington once and perhaps 
Morehead City once. All of the cruises have been highly 
successful, and have provided a relaxed atmosphere for 
medical seminars, business conventions and vacationers 
from main of the 48 states. Some 1,200 passengers em- 
barked this past season from State Docks. 

With the growing number of cruises each year, North 
Carolina adds another major tourist attraction to the 
many she tan already claim. More and more people 
come from distant places to lake advantage of the 
shorter travel time from Inline to port and less ex- 
pense, plus the efficient service, when planning their 
vacations. They have discovered that a vacation aboard 
ships such as the STOCKHOl M and the Alios \ SKI 
is a real vacation. 




Governor Luther II. Hodges was a passenger aboard one of 
the cruises of the MY AROSA SKY. He mad. the trip at the 
request o\ the Department of Conservation and Development 

to help stimulate interest in this in 11 and important phd 
North Carolina's tourist industry. 




It is probable that Governor Hodges was asked something 
about steering the "ship o/ state" as l,e posed for photographers 
who covered his departure Oil a Caribbean cruise, (apt. Hans 
Bordeaux, master o\ the IROSA SKY, ioincd the Tar Heel 
Governor in publicizing the event. Photos l-\ M • 




Burlington's knitting machines are housed in giant crates — over50-feet in length — by specialists in export 
crating at the firm's "Plant A." The crating is so expert that machines are ready to operate in a matter of 
hours because there is no re-assembly problem. 



BURLINGTON... SHIPPER 



There are at present something over 350 firms in 
North Carolina actively engaged in world trade. Some 
are relatively large, others are quite small. A few are 
giants of industry. 

One of these industrial leaders — Burlington Indus- 
tries, Inc., with headquarters in Greensboro — has been 
taking advantage of the State Port facilities. Recently 
some 20 hosiery knitting machines, weighing about 
37,000 pounds each, were shipped to Burlington Inter- 
national's new hosiery plant near Capetown, South 
Africa. Burlington International is a division of Bur- 
lington Industries. 

Each machine was housed in a plastic cocoon, crated 
and shipped out of Plant "A" (which handles packing 
and export shipments for Burlington International) 
near Burlington. The crating was an engineering feat 
in itself. After the water-tight cocoon was spun around 
each machine to protect it from moisture, a green oak 
house was literally built around the "mothballed" ma- 
chine — a house so tough that it could withstand vir- 
tually all possible stress or strain. 

Unit and crate, weighing about 19 tons each and 
some 50 feet in length, was then put aboard a specially 
designed truck and hauled to the State Ports Authority 
docks in Wilmington where the twin gantry cranes 
were used to lift the valuable cargo aboard ship. 



Because the knitting machines were so large, it was 
more expedient to load them on the decks of the large 
freighter running between the United States and 
South Africa, rather than going into the holds. Once in 
place on ship, the crates were covered with heavy, 
moisture-resistant paper, tied down, and were trans- 
ported across the South Atlantic to South Africa. 

Burlington's new plant is located at Diep River, near 
Capetown, with construction nearly completed. It will 
turn out full-fashioned hose for women with distribu- 
tion throughout the Union of South Africa and other 
areas of the African continent. 

The movement of the machines from Burlington to 
Capetown was unusual in many ways, as far as actual 
cargo handling was concerned. Working with the High- 
way Patrol, Burlington's specially-designed trucks fol- 
lowed a prescribed route in getting the giant crates to 
the State Docks. Then, although the SPA's gantry 
cranes are capable of lifting 45 tons each, they were 
used in tandem in this instance because of the extra 
care that had to be given the tremendous crates. 

This was the first time textile machines had ever 
been shipped intact through a North Carolina port. 
This permits the machines to be removed from the 
crates, placed into position, aligned and checked, and 
put into operation soon thereafter at the South African 
plant because there is no re-assembly problem. 




A plastic cocoon is spun around the machine before the out- 
side crating is completed to protect the valuable cargo en route 
to its new home in South Africa. 



The entire shipment of machines from the United 
States to South Africa went off smoothly despite the 
si/.c of the units and despite the difficulties inherent in 
the movement of such heavy equipment. When the SS 
ROBIN SHERWOOD picked up five of the machines 
recently, a group of interested spectators visited the 
State Docks to witness the actual loading procedure. 
Told that the operation would hegin at 8:30 a.m., the 
group arrived at 9:30 — but by that time the entire 
job had been completed. Five giant crates, totaling 
more than 185,000 pounds, had been taken out of 
the transit shed, rigged, hoisted aboard, emplaced on 
deck, covered with protective wrapping and tied down 
for trans-Atlantic crossing in an hour. 




Specially-designed trucks, such as this one, transport the 50- 
foot, 37,000 pound crates to the deep water terminal at Wil- 
mington. Thefc the gantry cranes pick up the heavy boxes and 
case them into transit sheds until such time as a ship puts in 
to pick them up. 





It was found more expedient to load these gia>it crates on deck 
of the ship, rather than put them in holds. Five of the ma- 
chines were taken out of storage, put aboard ship, covered 
with waterproof paper, and tied to deck ready to go in an hour. 



living loaded aboard the SS ROBIN SHERWOOD is this knit- 
ting machine for Burlington's new factor) near Capetown. 
South Africa. Soon African residents will he able to purchase 
full-fashioned hose made on this particular machine. 



SPUD FARMERS BENEFIT, TOO 



By NORWOOD YOUNG 



When .1 small German Freighter, the SS SENIOR, 
docked at Ocean Terminals in Morehead Cit\ to unload 
two million pounds of Canadian seed potatoes for 
I astern Carolina tanners, her use of the Morehead 
t ii\ port clearly demonstrated the current as well as 
the potential value of a port in Eastern Carolina's 
own backyard. 

I he spuds were summarily checked and approved 
lor grade, quality and condition by E. C. Price, of 
the U. S. Department of Agriculture, working under 
the Federal-State Inspection Service. James E. Crowe, 
deputy collector of U. S. Customs, Beaufort, was on 
hand to look after Uncle Sam's interests. 

Shipping agent was the Morehead City Shipping 
Company. 

The potatoes were imported by New Bern Oil and 
Fertilizer Co., and Hugh G. Swann, of New Bern, 
distributors. Shipped in 100-pound bags from Prince 
Edward Island, the seedlings included such popular 
varieties as Cobbler, Canso, Sebago, Keswick and 
Kennebec. 



This direct shipment from Canadian farmers enabl- 
ed their Eastern Carolina contemporaries to receive by 
short haul delivery the best in quality seed potatoes, 
fresh from their point of origin. Thus the loss normal- 
ly sustained through excessive hauling and handling 
was reduced to a minimum. Heretofore seed potatoes 
were freighted in overland from the port of Norfolk 
and other distant terminals. 

The SENIOR'S cargo was stored under ideal condi- 
tions at the Morehead terminal to await final delivery 
to the fields. The farmer again benefitted by not having 
to provide storage facilities prior to planting. Further- 
more, during the recent cold wave it is doubtful if he 
could have provided satisfactory storage. 

Needless to say, by shipping through the port of 
Morehead City the distributors benefitted also by hav- 
ing adequate storage within easy reach of the potato 
fields, and were thereby able to supply the seedlings 
daily as needed. Many local farmers furnished their 
own transportation from warehouse to field. 



Seedlings are planted 
two rows at the time 
on the farm of K. A. 
Merrill, Sr., of Beau- 
fort, Rt. 1 




- 



% 



\ 








Ctirtcrct County Farm Agent R. M. Williams and two State 
College Extension Service specialists inspect potatoes being 
quartered for planting on the farm of Ileber Golden, Beaufort, 
Rt. 1. Williams and his associates staged a demonstration for 
treating potato black leg and fusarium wilt with antibiotics at 
the Golden farm. Pictured here, left to right, are K. A. 
Merrill, Sr., Williams, H. R. Gariss and Henry Covington, of 
State College, and Golden. 



The unloading of the SENIOR'S cargo poured hund- 
reds of extra dollars into the economy of the Morehead 
City area. Longshoremen, ships' chandlers and ship- 
ping agents came in for a share of the revenue. 

A percentage of every dollar in profits and wages 
from the handling of the SENIOR'S or any other vessel's 
cargo at Ocean Terminals soon finds its way into such 
Eastern Carolina towns as New Bern, Kinston, La 
Grange, Greenville, Rocky Mount, and eventually 
throughout the state. Thus the economy of the entire 
state gets a boost from the port's operations. 

The money realized from handling the SENIOR'S 
cargo is "extra cash" — money that came to the state 
solely because of the port terminal in Eastern Carolina's 
backyard — money that would hare gone elsewhere had 
there not been a port of Morehead City. 

What holds true for the spud cargo also holds true 
for numerous other commodities such as fertilizer, 
sugar, coffee, commercial salt, and any other import 
item in demand throughout the state. Morehead City 
has already proven its worth as an export center for 
Eastern Carolina-grown tobacco. It can and is being 
developed as an outlet for such cargoes as dairy 
products, soy beans and other small grains, fish and 
vegetable oils, fats and tallows, hardwood timbers and 
numerous other export or import items. 

Port officials said all parties connected with the un- 
loading and receiving of the SENIOR'S cargo were well 
pleased with the operations. Capt. Werner Gottschalk 
was impressed by the port's facilities. lie was particular- 
ly impressed, he said, with its geographic location in 
relation to the Atlantic shipping lanes, and the brief 
time required to sail from deep water to dockside. 




Seed spuds by the bagful are unloaded from the steamer 
SENIOR, of Hamburg. 



E. C. Price, of the Federal-State Inspection Service, checks 

the spud cargo for grade, quality and condition. 




. 




Over 5,000 bales of Egyptian cotton is a pretty big cargo. 
This lot, aboard the SS STEEL ADVOCATE, had to be carried 
on deck because the holds were full. State Docks handled the 
shipment in record time, however. 



RECORD COTTON SHIPMENT ARRIVES 



A shipment of Egyptian cotton — the largest in the 
history of North Carolina — moved through N. C. State 
Docks in record time recently. 

Loaded aboard the Isthmian Line's SS STEEL AD- 
VOCATE at Alexandria, over 5,000 bales of long staple 
cotton arrived two weeks later in North Carolina. It 
was unloaded, segregated, tagged, sampled, fumigated 
and placed in bonded storage within 10 days. 

The operation was complicated somewhat, for also 
aboard the STEEL ADVOCATE and consigned to 
Wilmington were 1,500 bales of burlap from India, 
500 bales of jute and 1,300 cases of tea. The cotton 
had not been segregated when put aboard ship and 
some of it, consigned to other ports, had to be taken off 
the ship before the Tar Heel cargo could be reached and 
then replaced on the freighter. Also, a goodly number 
of bales had either lost markings or else the markings 
were illegible, thus complicating the process even more. 
Nevertheless the entire movement was carried out 
rapidly. 

After the cotton was identified, tagged and segregat- 
ed, the double fumigation chambers went into opera- 
tion. Well over 300 bales at a time rolled through the 
poison gas. After airing, and approval from the De- 



partment of Agriculture, the bales were moved into 
bonded storage. 

Wilmington Shipping Company served as agent for 
the cotton movement. Chief importers for the valuable 
fibre, much of which will eventually be woven into 
cloth in North Carolina mills, were Anderson and Clay- 
ton, Inc., Houston; Jones, Gardner and Beale, Mem- 
phis; George H. McFadden and Bros., New York; 
Schwabach and Co., New York; and E. A. Shaw and 
Co., Boston. 

When cotton was king in the South, Wilmington 
Harbor was the nation's biggest port, tonnagewise, in 
the export of the valued farm commodity. As the pro- 
duction of cotton declined in the South, so did exports 
through the port. In recent years there has been some 
export of American-grown cotton, but it has been in- 
significant when compared to the tremendous tonnages 
that moved out from the Cape Fear area 100 years ago. 

Now the economic pendulum has begun to swing the 
other way. The South — particularly North Carolina — 
is still the cotton textile manufacturing center of the 
nation. And where cotton is spun into thread and the 
thread woven into cloth and the cloth made into gar- 
ments, there is an increasing demand for the silky, 







Cluirlcs D. Gray of Gastonia, a member of the Vorts Authority 
niitl a textile executive, inspects the fibre — some of which will 
be manufactured into cloth in Tar Heel mills. With Mr. Gray 
is E. E. Lee, Jr., SPA's director of commerce and traffic. 



Hoard Member Gray and A. C. Smith, asst. operations manager, 
check the pressure at the fumigation chambers. All import 
cotton has to pass through the chamber and be approved by 
the Department of Agriculture before it can, enter the United 
States. 



This was the largest shipment of cotton ever received in the 
history of North Carolina. In addition to the 5,100 bales of 
cotton were bales of burlap, jute and cases of tea. 



strong, long staple cotton imports. The major opera- 
tion at deep water ports is rapidly becoming— if, in- 
deed, it has not already become — importing rather 
than exporting as far as cotton is concerned. 

Import or export, domestic or "exotic," cotton is still 
cotton insofar as basic handling is concerned at dock- 
side. Sampling methods may vary, one type bale may 
differ from another, but handling, storage, fumigation, 
stevedoring and so forth are pretty much standardized. 
That is why shipping through South Atlantic ports in 
general and through North Carolina ports in particular 
— where agents, stevedores and warehousemen have 
been trained for years to handle cotton — is recognized 
as the most economical, most efficient route. 




PERSONALITIES 





Lt. Commander Robert F. White 

Honorary Tar Heel— When the DE USS TILLS 

called at the State Docks in Wilmington she had aboard 
as her skipper Lt. Commander Robert F. White. The 
training cruise for N. C. Reservists was the last for 
Commander White, due to his retirement from the 
Navy when the mission was completed. 

At the end of the cruise, when the Destroyer Escort 
returned the Naval reserve trainees to land, Command- 
er White was presented an Honorary Tar Heel Award 
from Governor Luther Hodges by Publicity Director 
W '. W. Willson, in recognition of his many previous 
training cruises using the port of Wilmington. 

The TILLS is used primarily for such training 
courses for reserves in this region. She operates out of 
Wilmington and Charleston, the latter being her home 
base. 

Commander White is a native of Groton, Connecti- 
cut, and returned to his home there after his retirement. 
He hopes to visit North Carolina often, since he is now 
an "adopted" son. 



Mr. E. E. Heyrmann 

Inspection Trip — The State's port facilities at More- 
head City were the center of attraction for the presi- 
dent of the Belgian Line, Mr. E. E. Heyrmann. Dur- 
ing his inspection of the Ocean Terminal, Mr. Heyr- 
mann was shown transit sheds, warehouses, and open 
storage space, as well as loading and unloading fa- 
cilities and the modern fumigation plant. 

Mr. Heyrmann returned to his office in New York 
impressed with the facilities and services offered by 
the Ocean Terminal at Morehead City. 

Traffic Director Jack Lee, left, and Terminal Man- 
ager Walter Friederichs, right, discuss tobacco stor- 
age with Mr. Heyrmann. 




r 1 Ifil 






Ef « « 








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1 


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i 







Bishop John M. Springer 



despite the fact that he is 8 5 years old. Bishop and 
Mrs. Springer departed for Cape Town aboard the 
SS ROBIN SHERWOOD, a freighter oi the Robin 
Line. Heide and Company was agent for the vessel. 

Mrs. Springer's major task upon arrival in the Bel- 
gian Congo is the cataloguing or more than a thousand 
volumes in the Livingstone Memorial Library. The 
Library was founded In Bishop Springer in 19-51 with 
the Bishop's own books as a nucleus. I he library is lo- 
eated at kambou-, just north of I lisabethville, and 
welcomes books on other countries as well as those 
dealing with Africa. 

Bishop Springer has written several books on his e\- 
periences during 57 years of work in Africa. "Hearl 
or' Central Africa" (or "Mineral Wealth and Mining 
Opportunity") was written in 1908, "Pioneering in 
the Congo" in 1916, "Christian Conquests in the 
Congo" in 1926, and his latest, "I Love the lr.ul,' in 
1952, which is a sketch or' his first wife, lie has begun 
another book, which is in abeyance until he can devote 
more time to it. 

Bishop Springer and his wife have left the U. S. after 
an eight-year visit, spent stimulating interest in his 
missions in Africa and increasing the number of mem- 
bers of those missions. 



"Home to Africa" — Early this year a missionary and 
his wife visited State Docks before leaving for their 
home on the continent of Africa. Bishop John M. 
Springer, although officially retired as a missionary, will 
continue his career in mission work throughout Africa 




Bi.eM**' * ** 1 """ 



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iirrr... W\ >■** 



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i i 



NEW DIRECTOR ASSUMES POST 




D. LEON WILLIAMS 
Executive Director, SPA 



D. Leon Williams has taken over as executive direc- 
tor of the North Carolina State Ports Authority. 

A former resident of Atlanta, Mr. Williams served 
in a similar capacity with the Georgia Ports Authority 
and was with that organization from its inception until 
March of this vcar. 

In interviews with the press, Mr. Williams has 
stated: 

"I welcome the challenge and the opportunity pre- 
sented by the North Carolina ports program. My aim is, 
of course, to operate the State-owned facilities on firm 
business lines, to help develop commerce through North 
Carolina's deep water terminals, and to aid in the eco- 
nomic development of the state. 

"I realize the task ahead is a complex one and that 
miracles in the port business are few and far between. 
But the future of the State Ports program is a bright 
one. With concerted effort throughout North Carolina, 
with the help of all residents and businesses — all of 
whom have a sizeable investment in the terminals — 
we will certainly succeed in developing thriving port 
terminals at Wilmington and Morehead City." 

After attending Howard and Vanderbilt universi- 
ties, Mr. Williams became associated with General 
Electric and was District Representative (six states) 



before World War II. In the war period, he was regional 
priorities director for the War Production Board in 
Atlanta. Then he joined the Georgia Ports Authority. 

He has served as president of the South Atlantic Ports 
conference for three years, and for four years has serv- 
ed as a member of the board of directors of- the Ameri- 
can Association of Ports Authorities. Last fall he was 
elected a vice-president of the latter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Williams reside in Cameron Court 
apartments, Raleigh. They have one son, D. L. Wil- 
liams, Jr., who is with Union Bag and Camp Paper Co. 
of Houston, Texas. 

In announcing the selection of Mr. Williams to 
head the North Carolina program, John M. Reeves, 
chairman of the Ports Authority said: 

"We have concluded our search for a director con- 
vinced we have obtained for North Carolina the best 
man possible. He knows the South Atlantic port busi- 
ness, he understands the problems confronting our 
State's port development, and he is a recognized auth- 
ority in port management. 

' The Authority is delighted in securing a man with 
such a fine port background and such wide experience 
in the promotion and business management of docks 
and other port operations." 



12 




Ever noticed the . names of Japanese commercial 
vessels and wondered where the word MARU came 
from and what it means? 

Louis T. Moore, chairman of the New Hanover His- 
torical commission and sage of the Cape Fear, wonder- 
ed, too. But instead of shrugging off the question with 
"it means sea, or something like that," he investigated. 

And, according to Osamu Shimizu, head of the 
Japanese Section of the Library of Congress, the word 
MARU has stumped many an oriental as well as Occi- 
dental scholar. 

"Maru," an ancient word, means "round." No help 
there, except that many junks give the appearance of 
being round. 

As Mr. Shimizu notes "the most one may say on 
this problem is what "maru" is not — it has nothing to 
do with a shipping trust, nor does it have any religious 
significance insofar as is known. 

The word may be the result of corruption of "maro" 
— a term of endearment, says Mr. Shimizu. He finds 
records of swords, dogs, musical instruments, and even 
the names of famous people being accorded the suffix 
"maru" or "maro" — and the interchange of "o" to "u" 
in Japanese is simple. 

Anyway, all that is known about "MARU" for cer- 
tain is that it has appeared on the names of commercial 
ships since about 1871 when the Imperial Navy was 
established; and that it never appears on the name of 
a Japanese fighting ship. 



*2£ 



Live 'n' Learn Dept. : 

A ton of general cargo generates $12 in cash to 
the area where it is imported or exported via ship. 

A ton of bulk petroleum from a tanker puts $3.00 
into circulation in the local economy. 

These are direct dollar expenditures — money that 
would not be in circulation without the loading or un- 
loading of cargoes through ports. 

Thus North Carolina's economy was enriched last 
year by over $20,000,000 from activity at the ports 
of Wilmington and Morehead City. 

Add to that figure the millions of dollars of added 
value that the ports generate in inland freight reve- 
nues, in enabling North Carolina industries to compete 



for world markets, in the tourist trade developing 
through winter cruises, from local river traffi< from tin 
allied businesses sir li as insurance of cargoes and 
handling lees, and you ge( a tremendous dollar value 
of the North Carolina deep water ports. 



ev^C 



Requests for information from school children reach 
us in increasing amounts. Those requests, we find, fall 
into two categories — one legitimate and one which 
shows a disturbing trend among teachers and students 
to let others do their work. It is this latter group which 
bothers us. 

"My teacher has told me to write to you for infor- 
mation about world trade," or "my class is stucKing 
American shipping and I have been told to write to you 
for all the information I need," or "I have to write a 
paper on North Carolina. Please tell me about it." 

The State Ports Authority publishes some promo- 
tional literature which is available, but it is primarily 
aimed at prospective shippers. The SPA also publishes 
a magazine that is of more general interest. But the 
Ports Authority is not an authority on world trade, on 
North Carolina history, on American shipping. 

If teachers would think a moment before they refer 
students to some publicity or advertising bureau, and 
would steer their students to libraries, then teachers 
would be better teachers and students better students 

Apparently it has become far too easy for student^ 
to let others do their work. The SPA, therefore, humbly 
suggests that publicity bureaus must not take the place 
of libraries and that handouts can never replace a good 
encyclopedia. Research and study are far too important 
to be ignored. Knowledge just isn't obtained that easi- 
ly — nor should it ever be! 

NEW FORWARDING 
CORPORATION FORMED 

The formation of a new freight forwarding and 
customhouse brokerage firm has been announced. 
Known as Carolina Forwarding Corporation and chart- 
ered in late April, the firm was assigned FMB No. 
2309. 

President of the new corporation is O. \Y. Waters; 
W. S. R. Beane is vice-president, as is L. B. Finbcrg. 
R. W. Cantwell is the secretary-treasurer. 

Carolina Forwarding Corporation will maintain of- 
fices in Wilmington and Morehead Citv. 

"We had to form the new corporation simply because 
increased shipping through the North Carolina ports 
forced us into it," said Waters. 

"Business is growing at the Tar Heel ports and we 
found there was a real demand for a firm dedicated ex- 
clusively to freight forwarding.'' he added. 




WILMINGTON 



N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Philip L. Sullivan, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing three 500-foot vessels simultaneously, 
with depth of 34 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 
square feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

OPEN STORAGE: Three acres of paved open storage, 
easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. Certified weighmasters on 
twenty-four hour duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron; also depressed tracks at 
rear of transit sheds and warehouse, entire length. 
Storage yard on property for 240 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes 
for heavy lifts, single or in tandem, and equipped 
for 80-inch magnet work and 2-yard bucket opera- 
tion. 



14 



One 35-ton locomotive crane and one 25-ton loco- 
motive crane. 

Three Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of 
various sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton 
mobile crane. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at the transit sheds 
and warehouse; ramps for easy access into sheds 
and warehouses; portable side and end loading 
ramps for rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumiga- 
tion plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. Export crat- 
ing service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Seaboard 
Air Line Railroad companies and numerous highway 
motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



nmejr v~ „ v-p *r. 



1115 



.... . 




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■ 
1 




MOREHEAD CITY 



N. C. OCEAN TERMINALS 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petro- 
leum tanker, with a depth of 32 feet at mean low 
water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry with sprinklers 

One transit shed, 32,000 square feet, constructed 
of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 

A third transit shed, the newest, is of pre-fabricated 
steel construction with sprinklers and has capacity 
of 40,000 square feet. 

WAREHOUSES: Two storage warehouses, totaling 
88,000 square feet, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: A large open storage area is avail- 
able. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. At- 
lantic and East Carolina Railway freight car storage 
yard adjacent to Port property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 

Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Equipment for the loading of 
grain in ships or barges available. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easy access into transit sheds and 
warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Up-to-date fumigation plant of most 
modern concrete and steel construction is now in 
operation. Large single chamber is of latest design. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. Served by 
Atlantic and Fast Carolina Railway Co., C*> wholly- 
owned subsidiary of The Southern Railway System"). 
One interstate truck line on property, and served bv 
numerous highway motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



15 



THESE SIGNS MEAN 
SOMETHING 



The jargon heard around a dock often contains bits 
of local color — colloquialisms, perhaps. But there is 
nothing colloquial about the terms of sale and ship- 
ment that govern the control and responsibility of 
goods from point of origin to destination. 

There are five basic ways in which goods are pur- 
chased and delivered. They are EX, FOB, FAS, C&F 
and CIF. Here's what thev mean: 



<-H- 


"1 


EX 


i I 



lY-' 



CIF 




J__Li 




The seller disposes of his goods 
at a specified point of origin. 
The buyer then assumes re- 
sponsibility for the goods and 
pays for additional freight, in- 
surance and other charges of 
moving his new purchase from 
that point of origin. EX means 
Point of Origin. 



The seller of the goods assumes 
all costs and risks until his 
goods are placed aboard a car- 
rier at some predetermined 
point. There the buyer then 
takes over responsibility of his 
acquisition. FOB means Free 
on Board. 



The seller places his goods 
along side a ship. From the 
dockside on, the buyer assumes 
costs and risks for the goods. 
FAS means simply Free Along 
Side. 



The seller has included, in his 
selling price, the cost of trans- 
portation to a predetermined 
destination — but he is respon- 
sible for loss or damage only 
until the goods are aboard the 
ship — at which point the buy- 
er must assume that responsi- 
bility. C&F means Cost and 
Freight. 



The seller assumes cost of 
transportation and assumes re- 
sponsibility for loss and dam- 
age all the way from origin to 
the pre-named point of desti- 
nation. Buyer takes over re- 
sponsibility only after goods 
have arrived at destination. 
CIF means Cost, Insurance 
and Freight. 



ARABIAN HORSES 
ARRIVE IN U. S. 




This Arabian filly looks over her new country from a stall 
aboard the MV STEEL ADVOCATE at State Docks. She was 
one of five Arabian horses which entered the United States 
recently — the first group of horses to be exported from Egypt 
in a decade. 

Five Arabian horses, en route from Pharos, Egypt, 
to a ranch near Sapello, New Mexico, were put off 
the Isthmian Line's STEEL ADVOCATE at the State 
Docks recently. Valued in excess of $15,000, the con- 
signment included two yearlings and three two-year- 
olds. Of the five, four were fillies and one was a stallion. 

A sailor aboard the STEEL ADVOCATE, who had 
charge of the animals during the 14-day Atlantic cross- 
ing from Alexandria to Wilmington, said it was "a real 
rough trip for all of us." The horses were seasick the 
first few, days out and off their feed most of the trip. 
However, they began to eat well shortly before arriving 
in the United States. 

The animals remained in quarantine at State Docks 
for two days until cleared by the Department of Agricul- 
ture. Then they were taken by special horse van to 
their new home in New Mexico. 

The John J. McCabe Agency of Elmont, New York, 
served as importing agent and provided the van which 
housed the horses on their inland journey. 



PROVISIONS 
DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 
Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Socony-Vacuum Oil 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



16 



WILMINGTON: OFFICE RO 2-3327 - RES. RO 3-2893 

niMMYSwoouCF 

FROZEN FOOD CO. ^ 



WHOLESALE 

Ship Chandlery Division 
Provisions — Deck and Engine Supplies 

JIMMY BATUYIOS 

P. O. Box 1676 121 Hanover St. 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

Serving Wilmington and Morehead City 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents — Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



P. o. 


BOX 


249 


TELEPHONES 6-4651 & 6-4652 


CABLE ADDRESS 




William T. Davies 


MORESHIPCO 




Manager 


Peter B. Ruffin 




W. D. Williams 


President 




Secretary 


W. P. Emerson 




J. P. Wilson 


Vice-President 




Treasurer 


Wade H. Pierce 




Lemuel L. Doss, Jr. 


Assistant Secretary 




Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board freight Forwarder Registration No. 37G 



CAROLINA FORWARDING 
CORPORATION 

FMB 2309 

International Freight Forwarders 

and 
Custom House Brokers 

"Personalized Service" 



WILMINGTON MOREHEAD CITY 

TELEPHONE RO 3-5161 TELEPHONE 6-5080 



READY TO SERVE . . . 

Your Port Of Wilmington Needs 

In every phase of the agricultural and 
industrial development of North Caro- 
lina, this bank has been an important 
factor. 

It has consistently cooperated with the 
grower, the manufacturer, the shipper 
and the merchant, helping to make 
North Carolina the prosperous, progres- 
sive State that it is. 

THE 

WILMINGTON SAVINGS AND 

TRUST COMPANY 

"NORTH CAROLINA'S PORT BANK" 

COMMERCIAL • TRUST • SAVINGS 

Established 1888 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Coi 
Member Federal Reserve System 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

P. O. BOX 1619 

WILMINGTON. N. C. 



mKM CAROIim STATE UBHART 
HALEIGH* V.C. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. Postage 

PAI D 

Wilmington, N. C. 
Permit No. 225 



FORM 3547 REQUESTED 



Hulls 



CARGOES 



Yachts 



P. O. BOX 897 
RO 2-7721 




ESTABLISHED 
1878 



Protection & Indemnity 
All Other Marine & Overseas Coverages 



SHIP LAUNDRY 

AND DRY CLEANING 

One Day Service 

• 

IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 
CLEANERS, INC. 

FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE RO 2-6651 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction of 

Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and Bridges and 

Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK, N. Y. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE — WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 

(.REENHEART is highly resistant to marine horers, to fire and to 

abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, dolphins, 

rubbing posts, etc. 

f.REENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State docks 
at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 




DESIGNERS & 
BUILDERS 

FLOATING CRANES 

TUGS • BARGES 

DREDGES • FLOATING 

INDUSTRIAL PLANTS 

TRAVELING GANTRIES 
WHIRLY CRANES 



DIAMONE 

MANUFACTURING^^, ^^i IMPANY. inc. 



Ocean Steamship Terminals 




P. O. Box 647, Savannah, Ga. 



SMj. 



r If you've 
got it... a truck 

brought it ! 





YES— TO YOUR VERY DOOR. 



FROM SHIPSIDE 

To your very door 



BY TRUCK 



The N. C. Trucking Industry serves the fine North Carolina 
Ports. Trucks serve everyone — especially the more than 1800 
Tar Heel communities entirely dependent on Trucks for every- 
thing to eat, wear, use and sell. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Trucking Industry Building Raleigh, N. C. 



7 



North Carolina State Library 



MOREHEAD CITY 




HEIDE AND CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 



oYtfs Ao*^ 




WILMINGTON, N. C. 

TELEPHONE ROger 3-5161 
And 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

TELEPHONE PArk 6-5080 or PArk 6-3652 



PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 

W. D. WILLIAMS 

Secretary 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Assistant Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Vice-President 

J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 

LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 



LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 
Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Telephone RO 2-3381 WILSHIPCO 

Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT 

INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



SOUTH ATLANTIC LINE 

Regular service between North Carolina Ports and Ireland, 
United Kingdom, and North Continental Europe will call at 
Baltic and Scandinavian ports when sufficient cargo offers. 




AMERICAN PIONEER LINE 

South Atlantic Ports direct to Honolulu, Yokohama, 
Manila, Keelung, Kobe and other Far East ports. 

• 

AGENTS 
Wilmington Shipping Co. — Phone RO 2-3381 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Morehead City Shipping Co.— Phone PA 6-4651 

Morehead City, N. C. 



UNITED STATES LINES CO. 



NEW YORK 4, N. Y. 



DIGBY 4-5800 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 



Fall, 1951 



Vol. |V, No. 3 



Executive Offices 

Suite 220 Education Building 

P. O. Box 248 5 

Tel. TF.mple 4-3611 Fxt. 7335 

Raleigh, N. C. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

JOHN M. REEVES, Chairman 

WILLIAM G. CLARK, JR., 

Vice-Chairman 

COLLIER COBB, JR. 

KIRKWOOD F. ADAMS 

ROBERT L. EICHELBERGER 

CHARLES D. GRAY 

EARL N. PHILLIPS 

J. EDGAR KIRK, Secretary-Treasurer 



D. LEON WILLIAMS 

Executive Director 



E. E. LEE, JR., Director, 

Commerce 6- Traffic 
C. JACKSON, Traffic Manager 
R. A. DeVANE, Assistant Treasurer- 
Comptroller 
LEWIS H. LAWRENCE, 
Public Relations Director 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
H. N. LARCOMBE, Representative 



II 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

Room 1607, 32 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

BOwling Green 9-8389 

WILLIAM S. CHILDRESS 
Nciv York Representative 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

N. C. State Docks 

P. (). Box 1619— Telephone 

ROgei 3-1622 

TWX: WM 77 

AL C. SMITH 

Operations Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

N. C. Ocean Terminals 
P. O. Box 507— Telephone 6-3159 
TWX: Morehead City, N. C. 8782 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



Lewis H. Lawrence, Editor 

Katharine Byers, Associate liditor 



CONTENTS 

Tobacco Moves Through Ports 2 

Expansion Program ___ —4, 5 

Asphalt for the Arctic 6 

Mahogany Becomes Furniture 7 

Grain to Move Again 8, 9 

Promotions 1 

Visitors 1 1 

Nautical I. Q 12 

Heaving a Line 1 3 

Port Facilities, Wilmington 14 

Port Facilities, Morehead City 1 5 

Answers to Nautical I. Q. 16 

Public law 4 80 Important to Ports 17 

COVER 

Though tobacco is just one of the many commodities going 
through the ports of Morehead City and Wilmington the 
fall season shows a tremendous increase in tobacco tonnage. 
Story on pages 2 and 3. Cover photo by Charles McNeil. 



AT MOREHEAD AND WILMINGTON 



TOBACCO MOVES THROUGH 
N. C STATE PORTS 



While the fall season in North Carolina means increased busi- 
ness activity of many phases at the N. C. State Docks at Wilming- 
ton and Ocean Terminals at Morehead City, the tobacco story at 
these two North Carolina ports affects many lives throughout 
the state. The farmer, tobacconist, trucker and even smoker him- 
self is affected by the economics of shipping and transportation. 
A part of this story, as related to our State Ports, is told below. 





A cargo crop of Golden Weed for foreign shipment arrives at the modern transit sheds of the N. C. 
State Docks in Wilmington and at Ocean Terminals at Morehead City. Shown above is an initial load of 
tobacco that will be shipped through North Carolina's multi-million dollar docks. Since 1955, tobacco 
tonnage has increased approximately 60%. — (Al Smith photos). 





Here the trucks have moved into the transit sheds, where they are unloaded by fork-lift trucks and stacked 
ready for shipment. Rigid control of insect pests is strictly observed. At right above, a state worker is 
carrying out a part of the control operation — (Cape Fear Studio and Jerry Schumacher photos). 




Another part of the pest control operation. Modern fumiga- 
tion sheas at Morehead and Wilmington are among the coun- 
try's best. The fumigation process creates a strong vacuum — 
28130th of perfect — cyanide gas is released from the pump 
room. The gas cylinder rests on scales so that the exact 
amount of gas being released may he measured. The U. S. 
Department of Agriculture sends a representative from its 
Plant Quarantine Branch whenever fumigation is in process. 
This officer (loner right hand picture above i cheeks all pres- 
sure gauges, gas gauges a>id time chart. The process kills all 
animal life, even insect eggs. 





Onto the docks and over the side. Tobacco hogsheads move out of the transit sheds and are loaded onto 
waiting ships. Expert and efficient handling causes no delays in shipping. 





Into the hold and out to sea. The final stage is completed. The hogsheads have been secured in tlic 
ship's hold, and she heads out to sea, well satisfied with her lot. Hound for the processing plants of Europe 
and other parts of the world, the expert handling at N. ('. State Docks and Ocean Terminals lias made 
another friend for North Carolina industry, agriculture, and foreign markets. 






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Shown here is the architect's conception of the two new soon-to-be constructed berths of steel and con- 
crete, transit shed (120,000 square feet) and a large paved open berth. Drawing submitted by Henry 
von Oesen, Architect. 

EXPANSION PROGRAM 

AT MOREHEAD AND WILMINGTON 



Prior to the creation of the North Carolina State 
Ports Authority, and the construction of terminals, 
most North Carolina imports and exports moved 
through other ports. 

With an investment of approximately 12 million 
dollars in terminal facilities at Morehead and Wil- 
mington, Authority members and staff, under the. 
direction of D. Leon Williams, are hard at work con- 
vincing Tar Heel manufacturers and agriculturalists 
of the real advantages in utilizing their own terminals. 

The number of importers and exporters, and there 
are over 300 in N. C, is growing daily. Cargoes han- 
dled over the State's deep water terminals include 
many commodities which originate or terminate within 
North Carolina boundaries. Some are: Tobacco, wood- 
pulp, scrap iron, lumber, machinery, steel products, 
grain, dairy products, ore, minerals, manufactured 
products, sugar, chemicals and a variety of general 
cargo commodities. 



Expansion and growth of the ports is well illustrated 
by the leasing of grain handling facilities at Morehead 
to Fred Webb, Inc., and The Tar Heel Grain Com- 
pany, (see page 8) This expanded shipside grain 
loading facility will have a capacity of 350 tons per 
hour, benefiting grain people throughout the State. 

Terminal facilities at both ports are new and mod- 
ern. While many firms in N. C. now ship through 
other ports, they are slowly learning the good econ- 
omics of shipping through Wilmington and Morehead 
City. Exports of tobacco, for example, have increased 
over 40 per cent at both terminals since last year. 

The Ports Authority is trying to increase facilities 
as business at the ports increase. The present con- 
struction program at Wilmington will give two new 
berths of steel and concrete, 500 feet each — totalling 
1,000 feet; a large transit shed of 120,000 square 
feet, and a large paved open berth. 

Construction at Morehead City includes a large 
warehouse 90,000 square feet, water tank, additional 




Here is construction at Morehead City, showing 90,000 square foot warehouse, water tank, additional rail- 
road facilities. Drawing submitted by Frank Clark associated with tlie Allen ], Maxwell, Jr., Architect. 



railroad facilities and capital improvement to existing 
facilities. 

In 1956, the U. S. Department of Commerce re- 
ported that North Carolina's exports in dollars amount- 
ed to $373,600,000. These exports represented full 
time employment for at least 12,043 workers in eight 
principal industries in the State, plus increased earn- 
ings to farmers and agricultural workers. 

Industry exports represented $186,900,000, and 
agricultural exports of tobacco, cotton, soybeans, wheat 
and livestock totalled $186,700,000. Far too much 
of these exports have found themselves routed through 
out-of-state ports. 

Ports Authority Staff and members are presently 
hard at work developing imports, which have a great 
impact on state and national economy. Increased im- 
ports which are consumed daily could reduce the cost 
to the N. C. consumer and at the same time offer a 
new type of employment in the processing and handling 
of import items now coming to N. C. through out-of- 
State ports. 

Many affiliated services profit when products move 
through the State ports. Railroads, trucks, stevedores, 
forwarders, and marine insurance brokers are only a 
few. 

A typical example of the profits to affiliated services 
is one in which a shipment of an agricultural product, 



cotton seed meal, was generated within 150 miles of 
the port. This farm product brought to the port area 
the following revenues: $40,000 to the railroad fur 
delivery of the commodity to the ocean terminals; 
$20,000 to the stevedores for services in delivering 
the cargo from point of rest into the hold of the ship; 
$10,000 to the terminal operators for handling the 
commodity at the transit sheds, ami $5,000 to the 
freight forwarders, steamship agents and insurance 
companies. This totaled $75,000 for services alone, 
and does not include the value of the cargo. 

While cotton seed meal represents a very low freight 
rated commodity, a similar example of* a high rated 
commodity could run the costs of these services up to 
$100,000 to $125,000 per vessel. 

From Manteo to Murphy, more and more of North 
Carolina's businessmen are learning to capitalize on 
the economic importance to themselves of North Caro- 
lina's deep water terminals at both Morehead Citj and 
Wilmington. With good roads, excellent trucking and 
railroad facilities, anil expanding services at the docks, 
inland North Carolina industrj is taking a second look 
at the ports, just as are companies outside of North 
Carolina boundaries. 1 he future of the ports will de- 
pend, however, on industry and agriculture in North 
Carolina taking advantage of the real opportunity the 
ports at Wilmington and Morehead City offer. 



ASPHALT FOR THE ARCTIC 




Early in July, 1958 the S/S Ocean Dimiy was char- 
tered by MSTS for a quick trip to Greenland with 
cargo for our Armed Forces and for contractors en- 
gaged in constructing our Northernmost defences. The 
ship had to get there, discharge, and get out before the 
Arctic ice could hold her captive until next summer. 

Part of her cargo consisted of 6,000 drums of asphalt 
cement supplied by Mastic Tar Co. from Shell Oil Co. 
stock stored in tanks of the Trumbull Asphalt Co. plant 
directly adjacent to the Ocean Terminals in Morehead 
City. 

Mr. O. L. Miller, Div. Asphalt Mgr. of Shell Oil 
in Raleigh, N. C, and Mr. R. G. Gaskill, Plant Supt. 
of Morehead City's Trumbull Asphalt plant, were re- 
sponsible for drumming and delivery of this unexpect- 
ed large order to a North Atlantic Port in a very short 
time. 

Fast use of long distant telephone lines between all 
parties already concerned, plus S/S Agents, stevedores 
and the North Carolina State Ports Authority Office in 
New York, resulted in savings of time and cost by hav- 
ing the Ocean Dinny load these drums July 13th di- 
rectly at Morehead City. 

A cooperative effort was organized between suppliers 
of empty drums, the railroads, Asphalt & Petroleum 
Co. — truckers who hauled the hot mix to the drum- 
ming site near shipside, Trumbull Asphalt who did 
the actual drumming, Port Authority personnel who 
palletized the empty drums, placed them in the drum- 
ming area and removed the hot drums to point of rest 
prior to loading, and the stevedores, Morehead City 
Shipping Co. who accomplished the actual loading. 



The product was mixed and prepared at night, 
drummed, marked, cooled, and made ready for loading 
during daylight hours from sun-up to dusk, weekends 
and holidays included. 

"Bugs in the drumming process were successfully 
corrected in spite of time and weather. Then came 
the news — ; sailing date was changed from 7/13 to 
7/9 cutting production time by five days. 

Credit goes to the drumming crew, their manage- 
ment and the native determination, characteristic of 
North Carolinians generally, that close to 5,000 drums 
were ready for loading on time. The remaining 1 ,000 
drums were completed the day the vessel sailed, loaded 
into box cars and placed alongside the ship at her 
N. Atlantic loading port in time for the Ocean Dinny 
to sail as scheduled. 

Such experiences are invaluable to all local parties 
in a cooperative venture. Inevitable handicaps found 
in any first attempt were corrected to assure efficiency 
for future similar operations and plans were formu- 
lated on the spot for the anticipated next shipment. 

Col. J. S. Heiss, Cmding. Officer of Sunny Point 
Army Terminal, Lt. Leighten, U.S.N., and Mr. S. C. 
Steig representing Military Sea Transport Service were 
on hand to inspect the loading and Port facilities. 
These gentlemen expressed amazed satisfaction at 
what they saw of the Port, its ability to adapt on short 
notice, expedite the handling of cargoes, and its ex- 
pansion program under construction. 

{Charles McNeil Photos') 



VIA STATE DOCKS 



MAHOGANY BECOMES FURNITURE 



The genuine article — Honduras mahogany as ac- 
cepted by the Federal Trade Commission — arrived in 
Wilmington at State Docks for regularly weekly sched- 
uled shipments beginning September 8. It was deliv- 
ered by the Robinson Lumber Company of New 
Orleans, and came directly from the Nicaraguan Long 
Leaf Pine Company in Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua. 

This weekly service will result in direct benefits to 
the furniture industry in North Carolina. 

Present at dockside during the unloading process 
from the ship Managua were Charles VV. Robinson, 
partner in the Robinson Lumber Company, and Ralph 
Elliott, Elliott Lumber Company, Greensboro. Elliott 
is exclusive agent for Robinson Lumber in North Caro- 
lina and Virginia, while Wilmington Shipping Com- 
pany is forwarding agent for Robinson Lumber. 

Part of the regular shipment, long sought by the 
State Ports Authority, will be yarded at Wilmington. 
Most of the mahogany will go to several furniture fac- 
tories in N. C. 

"The bulk of our mahogany we expect will be com- 
ing into Wilmington," said Charles Robinson, who 
made a special trip from his home to inspect the port 
operations. 

"We have brought in approximately 30,000 pieces 
or 360,000 board feet. It is expected that future ship- 
ments will be of a minimum 200,000 board feet," Mr. 
Robinson added. 

The Robinson Lumber Company has been engaged 
in the lumber business since 1893 and are specialists 
in the manufacture, importing and exporting of ma- 
hogany and veneer. 

The mahogany story is a fascinating one for North 
Carolineans, and is more precisely told by J. H. 
Whaley, Editor of Furniture Production magazine 
(August, 1958 issue). Mr. Whaley was fortunate in 
being able to cover the entire story of how mahogany 
is taken from the forests of Nicaragua to the com- 
pletion of a finished product at one of our North Caro- 
lina furniture factories. The story is of vital economic 



interest to businessmen, educators and consumers, too 
many of whom give only passing thought to what is 
involved when they "have a seat." 

The logging operation of the Nicaraguan Long Leaf 
Pine Company cover two-thirds of Nicaragua, and com- 
munications with the camps are by Cessna 180 and 
two-way radio. 

First step in securing the mahogany begins during 
the rainy season, when the "Mosquito" Indians go into 
the jungle and plot areas and cut trails to trees. Usual- 
ly, there is only one or two trees in every five acres. 
While most of the trees are about 100 years old, many 
may be 300-400 years. 

After the rainy season, the dry season of February, 
March and parts of April begin, signalling the oppor- 
tunity for bulldozers to begin cutting main trails into 
the jungle. 

When the dozers go to work, 6 Indians go along, 
cutting vines and killing snakes. Each group has a 
gun bearer along who casually kills the tiger, moun- 
tain lion or snake which happens to bother the party. 
When a road is cut trucks then follow. There are 
about 1 3 contractors engaged by the company work- 
ing throughout Nicaragua. 

The mahogany trees themselves are felled by hand 
with a cross-cut saw, and it usually takes a day to top- 
ple many of them. 

A caterpillar tractor then "snakes" the entire tree 
out to the closest road, where it is "bucked" (sawed) 
into logs. The logs are then placed on trucks and 
taken to a river, where self-propelled barges carry them 
down stream. Some of the rivers are unsafe for this 
type operation because of river rapids. In this in- 
stance, the logs are cut free to float downstream, where 
they are caught by Indians along the route and tied to 
the bank. The company must pay for each log before 
taking possession. 

The logs, after purchase from the Indians, are then 
taken to mills for cutting, drying and shipment to all 
parts of the world . . . especially North Carolina and 
its furniture industrv. 



In the pictures below, Charles Robinson, Partner in Robinson Lumber Company (minus cap) and Ralph 
Elliott, Elliott Lumber Co., Greensboro, exclusive agent for Robinson Lumber in N. C. and Virginia, 
pause beside the Managua before watching the unloading process. Elsewhere, the two men watch the 
unloading process at the docks. Photo, below, right, shows the mahogany being placed on the dock by 
fork-lift truck. At the right of the stack, each piece is counted, as approximately 30,000 pieces had to be 
accounted for. 




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AT OCEAN TERMINALS, MOREHEAD 



GRAIN TO MOVE AGAIN 






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Grain will move again at Morehead's Ocean Ter- 
minals . . . to the tune of 350 tons per hour if 
necessary. Shown here is a part of the facility 
which is expected to include such additions as a 
truck dump and scale, additional track and scale 
for 10 railroad cars, and a leg (an endless belt with 
cups for grain handling). 



GREENVILLE, N. C, Sept. 3.— "After October 
10th, substantial tonnages of corn, soy beans and other 
grains will be moving through our facilities at Ocean 
Terminals in Morehead City," it has been announced 
by Fred Webb, President, Fred Webb, Inc., and part 
owner of the new Carolina Grain Company. 

"Our contractors for the special unloading facilities 
at Morehead, The Aeroglide Corporation of Raleigh, 
have assured us that these special facilities will be 
ready by this date," Mr. Webb said. 

"This means that we will have facilities to transfer 
our grains from railroad cars and trucks to ocean going 
vessels, with capacity to unload and load 3 50 tons 
per hour. 

"Additions at the Morehead Terminals will include 
a truck dump and scale, railroad track, scale and leg 
(an endless belt with cups for grain handling). It is 
also expected that some tanks for storage will be erect- 
ed, to insure adequate cargo for vessels calling at the 
port," Webb continued. 

Official inspection and weighing at Ocean Terminals 
will be under the supervision of the N. C. Department 
of Agriculture, headed bv O. W. Faison. 




FRED WEBB, of Fred Webb, Inc., Greenville, will 
be the "prime mover" in seeing that grains flow 
through the port. — (Lawrence photo). 



Fred Webb, Incorporated, Greenville, has access to 
2 J /2 million bushels of storage facilities in inland 
North Carolina. Mr. Webb has commented that with 
these facilities at Washington, N. C, Greenville and 
Tarboro, grain should move through the port without 
difficulty. 

Leon Clifton, 29, at present elevator superintendent 
for Fred Webb, Inc., in Greenville, will be the new 
superintendent at the Morehead facilities. Clifton was 
formerly associated with the North Carolina Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and held a license as an official 
U. S. Grader. He has handled a substantial volume 
of grain at the Greenville plant, and looks to his new 
duties at Morehead with enthusiasm. Married, and 
the father of three children, he anticipates moving to 
Morehead sometime after October 10. 

An official statement came from Greenville Cham- 
ber of Commerce President John T. Barnhill. Barn- 
hill, a partner of Hendrix-Barnhill Equipment Com- 
pany, said that the expansion program of Fred Webb, 
Inc., will benefit not only Greenville and Morehead 
City, but all of North Carolina. 



"What Fred Webb has accomplished is a good illus- 
tration of how more North Carolina businessmen can 
obtain their objectives by utilization oi' our State Ports," 
the Chamber President stated. 

The Tar Heel Grain Company, Inc., of Speed, 
N. C, and Fred Webb, Inc., of Greenville, now lease 
the Morehead facility from the State Ports Authority. 




LEON CIJFTON, Elevator Supervisor, will begin his new 
duties at Morehead about October 1. — (Lawrence photo). 



Tar Heel Grain Companj is a wholl) owned subsidiary 

of P. 11. Markley, Inc., of Philadelphia. 

The new lease runs to December 31, 1959 with an 
option to renew for five years. Alter that period, tlu 
new lessee will pay an annual rent and agrees to ship 
substantial tonnages of grain through the port facility 
each year. Revenue is derived bj tin Ports Authority 
through grain handling charges. 

I). I, eon Williams, I \ecuti\c Director ol tin \. ( 
State Ports Authority, has informed tin ( ounciJ of 
State that terms of the negotiations with the new 1 es- 
sees assures payment of outstanding bonds issued to 
construct the facility. He said tin \ .ire sufficient to 
pay lease cancellation requirements .mil meel all i \ 
penses connected with the re-negotiations Involved 
when the State Ports \uthorit\ purchased the grain 
handling facilities from Cargm, Incorporated. 

Four major grain companies were approached in an 
effort to reactivate the Morehead C it\ grain handling 
facility, idle since 1956. Built in 1955 at a cost ,,| 
$80,000, the project was financed with State Ports 
Authority Bonds. Cargill, Incorporated, the original 
operator, used the facility onh one year and paid near- 
ly $69,000 in principal and interest on the indebted- 
ness. The remaining indebtedness has been assumed 
by the new tenants. 

Fred Webb, a native of North Carolina, and a 1939 
graduate of the School of Agronomy in North Carolina 
State College, is married and has four children. He 
has his home in Greenville, and is closelv associated 
in business there with Pete Alderman. Assistant Man- 
ager of Fred Webb, Inc., and William P. Mav, ac- 
countant for the firm. 



J&* 







Truck at grain elevator in Greenville, N. C, at the G. E. 
Grain Mills, Inc. A different type lift will lie used at More- 
head. — (Lawrence photo). 




JOHN T. BARNIULL, Green- 
ville Chamber of Commerce 
President, believes more N. C. 
businesses could profit h\ use 
of the N. C. Ports.— (Law- 
rence photo). 



► 




If you've 
got it... a truck 

brought it ! 





YES, TO YOUR VERY DOOR 

FROM SHIPSIDE 

To your very door 

BY TRUCK 

The N. C. Trucking Industry «erves the fine North Caro- 
lina Ports. Trucks serve everyone — especially the more 
than 1800 Tar Heel communities entirely dependent en 
Trucks for everything to eat, wear, use and sell. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Trucking Industry Building Raleigh. N. C. 



PROMOTIONS . . . 

The appointment of Walter H. Frederichs as Opera- 
tions Manager of the Ports Authority Ocean Terminals 
in Morehead City, with Charles McNeil as Assistant, 
and of Al Smith as Operations Manager at the State 
Docks in Wilmington, begins a new cycle in the re- 
sponsibilities of an efficient ports management, it has 
been announced by D. Leon Williams, Executive Direc- 
tor. 

WALTER FREDERICHS is Morehead City Ocean 
Terminal operations manager, a native of Hamburg, 
Germany, and a graduate of the New York Maritime 
Academy, N. Y. He holds a Master's License, and 
joined the Ports Authority staff in 1954 as assistant 
operations manager. Formerly employed as a marine 
underwriter, Frederichs is married and has two chil- 
dren. 





SHIP LAUNDRY 


AND DRY CLEANING 


One Day Service 




IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 


CLEANERS, INC. 


FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE RO 2-6651 


WILMINGTON, N. C. 


"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction 

of Steamship Piers. Railroad Trestles and 

Bridges and Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK, N. Y. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE — WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 

GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and 

to abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, 

dolphins, rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State 
docks at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 





CHARLES McNEIL, Assistant to Frederichs, is a 
native of Whiteville, N. C, and also a graduate of the 
Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, N. Y. He 
is also married and has two children. A commercial 
artist, much of his work has appeared in local and na- 
tional publications, the latest appearing in the maga- 
zine, "Ford Times". Quite naturally, most of his oils, 
water colors and sketches are concerned with ships and 
shipping. 





AL SMITH, Operations Manager at State Docks in 
Wilmington, was formerly Docks Superintendent. He 
has been associated with the Ports Authority for five 
years, and has had wide practical experience in the 
port operation. 





LEWIS H. LAWRENCE, Public Relations Director, 
is a native of Murfreesboro, N. C. A graduate of the 
University of N. C. School of Journalism in 1950, he 
subsequently managed several Chambers of Commerce 
in North Carolina and Alabama. Before accepting 
appointment with the Ports Authority, Lawrence was 
Executive Secretary of the Medical Society in Bir- 
mingham. He is married to the former Mitchell Lee. 
They have one son, age seven. 



10 



VISITORS . . . 



S/S PIONEER MART ENTERTAINS 
IN MOREHEAD CITY 

Port officials, shippers, city officials, their families 
and various steamship representatives were given quite 
a treat in Morehead City aboard the S/S Pioneer Mart 
at the Ocean Terminals July 2 5, 1958. 

This was the lirst commercial call of a Mariner class 
vessel to the N. C. State Ports Authority facilities in 
Morehead City. To celebrate the event, a congenial 
party was arranged by the South Atlantic Division, 
representative of U. S. Lines, Mr. Pentacost and Mr. 
Bill Davis of Morehead Shipping Co., agents for the 
Line. 

The Pioneer Mart loaded tobacco for Far East Ports 
and company representatives and shippers expressed 
hope that many such Far Fast shipments would follow 
in the near future. Families and friends of the guests 



.M&gP 




Mr. ]. A. "Jim" Boykin, of Gallaher, Ltd., watches the loading 
of sonic of iiis firm's tobacco hound for England, aboard the 
British Vessel Ramore Head at the N. C. State Docks. Galla- 
her has used the State Docks for the past several years and 
again this year is very well pleased with the facilities and 
operations. — (Al Smith photo). 




Air. Hugh Trussell. Production Manager of Babcock £r Wil- 
cox's Wilmington Works, is shown with Mr. L. T. Arkell. 
"Traffic Manager of Canadian-Brazilian Services, Ltd., Toronto, 
Canada, as they examine boiler components stored at the N. C. 
State Docks. The material is awaiting shipment to Brazil. 
The boiler was bought from Babcock & Wilcox, who fabri- 
cates components, ships to Wilmington for compilation and 
later shipment to Brazil. — (Al Smith photo). 




were delighted at the luxurious accommodations and 
the line service aboard the Pioneer Mart. 

Captain Wilson, Master of the Pioneer Mart, has 
quite a distinguished record with I. S. lines and 
Maritime affairs. Prior to World War II, he was exe- 
cutive officer on the S/S America. From 1941-1943 
he was Commandant of Cadets at the I . S. Merchant 
Marine Academy, Kings Point, New York. 

Grouped on the wing of the bridge are some of the 
guests. From left to right are: Mr. Zingelmann, M/C 
exporter, Mr. Rowland of James I. Miller Tobacco Co., 
Mr. Bob Hicks, Heide & Company, Mr. Bill Davies, 
M/C Shipping Co., Mr. Kirby Moore, Representative 
of W. O. Smith, Freight Forwarder, Mr. Walter 
Fricderichs, Operations Manager, N.C.S.P.A., More- 
head City, Mr. Pentacost, V. S. Lines Representative, 
Captain Wilson, Master of the Pioneer Mart. Mr. Col- 
lier Cobb, Member, N.C.S.P.A., and Dr. Ben Roval, 
U. S. Public Health Officer and Morehead City Port 
Pioneer. 



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INDUSTRIAL PLANTS 

TRAVELING GANTRIES 
WHIRLY CRANES 



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CAROLINA FORWARDING 
CORPORATION 

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Freight Forwarders 

and 

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• 
"Personalized Service" 



WILMINGTON MOREHEAD CITY 

Telephone RO 3-5161 Telephone PA 6-5080 



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HOW'S YOURS? 

NAUTICAL I. Q. 

The FOLLOWING ARE STANDARD SYMBOLS 
USED ON NAVIGATION CHARTS: You're a land- 
lubber for sure if you can't read most of them. Answers 
found on page 16. Consult only after writing in 
answers below. All residents of Morehead and Wil- 
mington are expected to make "100". 




Bent tubes? Yes — but curved on purpose! Though they look 
like "metal spaghetti" , these riser tubes will be used in the 
erection of a boiler consigned to Brazil. — (Al Smith photo). 



12 




N. C. FIELD OFFICE 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

SERVES N. C. WORLD TRADERS 

The North Carolina world trader can receive guid- 
ance and assistance from the Department of Com- 
merce Field Office in Greensboro. The following list 
indicates the scope and diversity of information avail- 
able: 

Facts on economic and trade conditions; 

Lists of potential buyers, agents, or other distribut- 
ors and reports on their commercial standing; 

Documentation of export and import shipments, 
both here and abroad; Tariff rates of foreign coun- 
tries on specific American products; 

Regulations bearing on the control of exchange 
abroad; 

Administration of regulations imposing import 
quotas and the details of import licensing procedures 
in overseas markets; 

Statistical data on both imported and exported 
products; 

Foreign licensing investment and manufacturing 
opportunities; 

Factors to be considered in the establishment of a 
branch plant abroad. 

The address of the office is: 

Field Office 

U. S. Dcpt. of Commerce 

P. O. Box 1950 

Room 408 

Post Office Bldg. 

Greensboro, N. C. 



Joel B. New 
Business Analyst 
Foreign Trade 



Made in West Germany and shipped via steamship to V. C. 
State Docks, these DKW Sonderklasse autos will be distributed 
to automobile dealers throughout the United Sititts. — (Al 
Smith photo). 



He can help you! 




Every Southern Railway sales and service 
representative is a specialist in shipping 
matters. Why not let him help you with 
your overseas shipments to and from the 
South? He will be pleased to serve you! 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTE 




1 * 




WILMINGTON 



N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Al Smith, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing three 500-foot vessels simultaneously, 
with depth of 32 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 
square feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

OPEN STORAGE : Three acres of paved open storage, 
easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. Certified weighmasters on 
twenty-four hour duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wbarf apron; also depressed tracks at 
rear of transit sheds and warehouse, entire length. 
Storage yard on property for 240 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes 
for heavy lifts, single or in tandem, and equipped 
for 80-inch magnet work and 2-yard bucket op 
tion. 



One 35-ton locomotive crane and one 25-ton loco- 
motive crane. 

Three Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of 
various sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton 
mobile crane. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at the transit sheds 
and warehouse; ramps for easy access into sheds 
and warehouses; portable side and end loading 
ramps for rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumiga- 
tion plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. Export crat- 
ing service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Seaboard 
Air Line Railroad Companies and numerous highway 
motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



14 




MOREHEAD CITY 



N. C. OCEAN TERMINALS 

W. H. Fricderichs, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 2,5 50 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petro- 
leum tanker, with a depth of 30 feet at mean low 
water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry with sprinklers 

One transit shed, 32,000 square feet, constructed 
of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 

A third transit shed, the newest, is of prefabricated 
steel construction with sprinklers and has capacity 
of 40,000 square feet. 

WAREHOUSES: Two storage warehouses, totaling 
88,000 square feet, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: A large open storage area is avail- 
able. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. .At- 
lantic and East Carolina Railway freight car storage 
yard adjacent to Port property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 

Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Equipment for the loading ol 
grain in ships or barges available. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for eas\ access into transit sheds auA 
warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Up-to-date fumigation plant of most 
modern concrete and steel construction is now in 
operation. Large single chamber is of latest design. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federal!] ap- 
proved potable water supplj at shipside. Served by 
Atlantic and East Carolina Railway Co., (a wholly- 
owned subsidiary of fhe Southern Railway System). 
One interstate truck line on property, and scned b\ 
numerous highway motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



15 



Office Equipment and Supplies for N. C. Ports 

Authority Offices Furnished by Storr Sales 

Company. 

STORR SALES COMPANY 

Office Equipment and Supplies 



Post Office Box 
1546 



Telephones 
TE 2-5672 & TE 4-1610 



1732 Louisburg Road 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents - Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

P. O. BOX 249 

TELEPHONES 
PArk 6-4651 PArk 6-4652 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 

Peter B. Ruffin 

President 

W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 

Wade H. Pierce 

Assistant Secretary 



William T. Davies 

Manager 

W. D. Williams 

Secretary 

J. P. Wilson 

Treasurer 

Lemuel L. Doss, Jr. 

Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 376 



PROVISIONS. 
DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 

Representative oi 

Columbia Rope Wilmington, N. C. 

International Paint Telephone RO 2-4232 

Socony-Vacuum Oil Co., Inc. Water & Market Sts. 



ANSWERS TO YOUR 

NAUTICAL I. Q. 

(Cont'd from Page 12) 





Buoys — any kind (or 


red) 


Buoys — Black 




Buoys — Bell 






Lighthouse 

LL .. . 


fing number 


V^/ V^v' Light vessels shov 
of mast lights 


1 


Beacon, not lighted 




R.S.0 Radio Station 






Rock submerged 




<+F£ 


Wreck (dangerous) 




± 


Anchorage 






The British steamship Treglisson takes aboard 5000 hogs- 
heads of Imperial Tobacco Company's leaf for export to Eng- 
land. 



16 



PUBLIC LAW 480 IMPORTANT TO PORTS 



UJ6 1 * 




Congressman Alton Lcnnon, seated, and 11. N. Larcombe, standing, arc only two of those who 
planned the attack to have corrective machinery set in motion to help South Atlantic l'<>:S>. Ah 
working in the program were Cecil Tate, Seaboard Air Line Railroad, Congressman Harold ' 
Congressman Graham Harden. 



PL 480 has been extended for 2 more years. 

A representative or the North Carolina State Ports 
Authority, II. N. Larcombe, serving as spokesman tor 
all South Atlantic Ports, along with Cecil Tate of the 
Seaboard Air Line R. R., serving in the interest of 
Southeastern rail carriers, recently took the initiative 
in trying to end what they consider economic waste 
in a program under legislation known as Public Law 
480. The men spent a year gathering facts needed 
to present their case. 

With the help of Congressmen Harold Cooley, Alton 
Lennon, ami Graham Barden, corrective machinery 
has been set in motion. 

After several meetings with interested port repre- 
sentatives and rail carriers, as well as U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture officials, exploratory sessions were 
conducted with the Congressmen and Mr. fohn Heim- 
berger, counsel for the House Committee on Agricul- 
ture who took the problem directly back to the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. It is probable that some of IT 
480 may be rewritten, so that the most economic cost 
of shipping freight — from the point of origin to stor- 
age aboard ship — be followed. 

The federal government, through its Department of 
Agriculture, is a major exporter of food ami food prod 
nets. Under legislation known as Public I aw 4 80, 



surplus commodities are either sold at government cost. 
sold below cost, or given away through various reliei 
programs. 

PL 480, subdivided into three classes, is known 
simply as Titles one, two ami three. Agriculture De- 
partment officials must polite shipments under titles 
two and three — that is. see to it that the price paid for 
a commodity the mode oi transportation, port used, 
and ocean freight rates are all kept to an absolute min- 
imum. 

When goods mo\e out under I itle one. the govern- 
ment cheeks price paid for the commodit\ and 
freight costs, but it does not check upon inland freight 
rates or other charges. 

Where the government controls the entire program, 
a large amount of surplus goods moves through the 
South Atlantic Poits as the most economical. But 
where the government does not police the operation, 
none moves through South Atlantic Ports. 

Since all these programs are sponsored hv the people 
of the nation who. through their taxes, underwrite the 
programs, the South Atlantic Ports, which offer lower 
inland freight rates from producing territories and 
lower costs, art' anxious to bring the subject to a con- 
elusion and have the law placed in its proper perspec- 
tive. 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

P. O. BOX 1619 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 



mm. cAsoum &m& urnm 



BULK RATE 
U. S. Postage 

PAI D 

Wilmington, N. C. 
Permit No. 225 



FORM 3547 REQUESTED 



\ Vfl 9 I 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 




For Economy • Efficiency • Speed . 

. Ship via the Mid-South Short Way 




North Carolina State Ports Authority 




N. C. Ocean Terminals at 

MOREHEAD CITY 



N. C. State Docks at 

WILMINGTON 



Charles McNeil, Artist-Illustrator 



North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 



STATE PORTS 





^ 




"K Morehead Citv^X 
Wilmington ir 



NORTH CAROLINA DEEP WATER TERMINALS 

BRING A WORLD OF COMMERCE 
TO YOUR DOOR 



V 




• •on 



:lhaO 



-V 



JANUARY, 1959 



I 




HEIDE AND CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 




WILMINGTON, N. C. 

TELEPHONE ROger 3-8271 
And 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

TELEPHONE PArk 6-5080 or PArk 6-3652 



PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 

W. D. WILLIAMS 

Secretary 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Assistant Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Vice-President 

J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 

LEMUEL L. DOSS. JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 



LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 
Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Telephone RO 2-3381 WILSHLPCO 

Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Page 

Carolina Forwarding Corporation 12 

Diamond Manufacturing Co. 11 

Durant, O. E., Ship Chandler 16 

First Citizens Bank & Trust Co. 3 

Greenheart (Demerara) Inc. 10 

Heide & Company Inside Front Cover 

Ideal Laundry & Dry Cleaners, Inc 10 

Morehead City Shipping Co. 16 

N. C. Motor Carriers Association 9 

Southern Railway .13 

Security National Bank 6 

United States Lines Company 7 

Walker Taylor Insurance 10 

The Bank of Wilmington 8 

The Wilmington Savings & Trust Company 12 

Wilmington Shipping Co. Inside Front Cover 




State Docks, Wilmington 
NEW SHIP SERVICE 

A new regular steamship service for State Docks at Wilm- 
ington has been announced by State Ports Director D. 
Leon Williams. 

Ozean-Stinnes Line will call at Wilmington fortnightly on 
sailings from Hamburg, Bremen, Rotterdam and Antwerp. 

This luill make a total of five regularly scheduled sailings 
from Europe and the Far East to Wilmington State Docks 
and ocean terminals, Morehead City, since July. More about 
the new schedules on page 3. 

Williams made the announcement jointly with Heide and 
Co., Wilmington agent for Ozean-Stinnes Line. Williams 
pointed out that the new schedule will give importers the 
advantage of increased sailings. The Hasselburg, above, a 
ship of the Ozean-Stinnes Line, as she unloaded in Wilm- 
ington recently.— (Star-News photo). 




Executive Offices 
Suite 220 Education Building 

P. O. Box 2485 

Tel. TEmple -1-3611 Ext. 7335 

Raleigh, N. C. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

JOHN M. REEVES, Chairman 

WILLIAM G. CLARK, JR., 

Vice-Chairman 

COLLIER COBB, JR. 

KIRK WOOD F. ADAMS 

ROBERT L. EICHELBERGER 

CHARLES D. GRAY 

EARL N. PHILLIPS 

J. EDGAR KIRK, Secretary-Treasurer 



D. LEON WILLIAMS 
Executive Director 



E. E. LEE, JR., Director, 
Commerce & Traffic. 
H. C. JACKSON, Traffic Manager 
R. A. De VANE, Assistant Treasurer- 
Comptroller 
LEWIS H. LAWRENCE, 
Public Relations Director 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
H. N. LARCOMBE, Representative 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

Room 1607, 32 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

BOwling Green 9-8389 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
TV. C. State Docks 
P. O. Box 1619-Telephone 
ROger 3-1622 
TWX: WM 77 

AL C. SMITH 

Operations Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

N. C. Ocean Terminals 
P. O. Box 507-Telephone 6-3159 
TWX: Morehead City, N. C. 8782 

W. H. FR1EDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



NORTH CAROLINASTATE PORTS 



OFFICIAL PUBLICA1 ION OF N (.. S. P. A. 



January, 1959 



Vol. V, No. 1 



Correspondence concerning THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
PORTS magazine should be addressed to: Lewis H. Lawrence, Editor, 
North Carolina State Ports, Suite 220, Education Building, Raleigh, 
N. C. 



CONTENTS 

Page 
Golden Chamois via N. C. Ports 2 

5 New Steamship Services — 3 

Corn-7,500 Tons - 4 

Equipment for Scrap Exporters — 5 

Oil - — 6 

Lumber — - — 7 

Construction— Wilmington & Morehead 8 

Director's Report 9 

Success to the Tulley - 10 

World Trade and You - 10 

Visitors _ — 11 

Nautical I. Q. 12 

Trade Leads ...13 

Port Facilities _ .14-15 

Answers to Nautical I. Q 16 

A A P A Elects Williams First Vice President 17 



COVER 

Srat tuiH^pB for tlje Nrui $ear from ttjr &taff and Mtm- 
brrH of tb;p ^'nrtlj (Carnltna &tatr Jlnrtu Authnrtly. 



AT DRUEDING BROS., GOLDSBORO 




Sheep Skins Become Golden 
Chamois Via N. C State Ports 



Thousands of sheep, 100 businessmen of Goldsboro, the 
world's largest chamois manufacturer, along with the North 
Carolina State Ports, are a combination of interests serving 
North Carolina. The sheep droving scene shown in the left 
hand picture began their treck to N. C. ports from the east 
coast of the North Island, New Zealand. Their skins will be- 
come chamois at Drueding Brothers, Inc., Goldsboro. All 
photographs below were taken by Bill Futrell, Goldsboro 
News Argus and supplied by courtesy of Goldsboro's Com- 
mittee of 100, of which Lynn Covert is director. 





After arriving from N. C. State ports and having been sorted for size, the skins, left, above, go to the 
"wash-out tubs" (rear), to "swelling drums" (right) to "stretching out machine" (left) and finally are placed 
in "pelt starting" piles. In the right-hand picture above, the skins are "split". Splitting divides the skin 
into "skiver" or "grain" and "Flesher". The skiver is the portion of the skin next to the animal hair, and 

is used for hat bands, bookbindings and other necessities. 
The "flesher" is the inner lining of the skin next to the 
flesh, and this portion is made into chamois. 

After the "splitting" operation, the "flesher" is ready 
for "oiling", which takes place when the skins are placed 
in drums containing cod oil. Later, the skins are washed 
in large tubs and taken to the "drying room." Once dry, 
the shrunken skins are ready for the "finishing room" and 
"buffing wheels". "Fluff" collected from the buffing process 
becomes fertilizer. 

It takes three weeks for the skins to be processed and 
the Drueding plant finishes about 500 dozen chamois per 
day. Distribution is to wholesale drug houses, hat and 
leather manufacturers, the automobile industry and to 
Borsalino (the Italian Stetson). Skins also reach Germany, 
Australia and England. 

At the left, Albert Drueding, Rus Myers, Jr., and Rus 
Myers, Sr., officers of Drueding Bros., examine their North 
Carolina "Golden Chamois." 




Five New Regularly Scheduled 
Steamship Services 



Hard work by steamship agents in Wilmington and 
Morehead City, in cooperation with the N. C. State 
Ports Authority, has resulted in five new regularly 
scheduled services for North Carolina State Ports. 

These new services, which themselves generate new 
business for the State-owned facilities, have been re- 
sponsible for the movement of many additional thou- 
sands of tons of cargo in 1958. 

A report to the State Ports Authority offices in Ra- 
leigh, from O. W. Waters, Vice President for Heide & 
Company, Steamship Agents at Wilmington and More- 
head City, shows that his company is responsible for 
securing one new regularly scheduled line since July. 
This is the Ozean-Stinnes Line. Their ships sail from 
Hamburg, Bremen, Rotterdam and Antwerp to Wil- 
mington, and then to Morehead City and other South 
Atlantic Ports. 

According to L. L. Doss, Jr., Traffic Manager for 
Wilmington Shipping Company, his company is agent 



for three new regularly scheduled services since July. 
The first of these is a regular service from Cermany 
which was established by the United States Lines. 

Wilmington Shipping's second new service is a reg- 
ular monthly service from the Philippines, Formosa, 
Hong Kong and Japan to Wilmington, and is operated 
by Daido Line. These vessels load outward for Manila, 
Keelung, Hong Kong and the Japanese ports of 
Nagoya, Osaka, Kobe, Shimizu and Yokahama. 

The third new service for the company is an out- 
ward service operated by Isthmian Lines from Wil- 
mington to Alexandria, Beirut, Lebanon, Juddah (Ara- 
bia), Colombo, Ceylon and the Indian ports of Bom- 
bay, Calcutta and Madras and the Port of Karachi in 
Pakistan. 

A newly organized shipping agent. International 
Shipping Company, of which Philip Sullivan is vice 
president, has also instituted a regular scheduled 
monthly service. This is the Mamenic Line. 



We invite . . . 




shippers 



growers and 




manufacturers 



-r-i-4 merchants 



to use our complete banking facilities in the 

port of Morehead City. 

In Morehead City . . . Beaufort 

Raleigh and other 

fine N. C. communities. 

SERVING NORTH CAROLINA SINCE 1898 




IRST- 

CITIZENS 

BANK £ TRUST 
COME' 



MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 





CORN- 7,500 Tons Through 

Morehead's Ocean Terminals 

The first shipload of grain— 7 ,500 tons— moved through the new grain 
facilities at Morehead City's Ocean Terminals recently, flowing into the 
hold of the ship Trinity. Present for the initial loading and expressing 
pleasure in the event were ( standing, right, above, from I. to r.), A. D. Stuart, 
agronomist, N. C. Agricultural Extension Service and Chairman, N. C. Grain 
Production and Marketing Committee. Joe Du Boise, Mgr., Morehead City 
Chamber of Commerce; Bud Dixon, President, Morehead City C of C; Mayor 
George W . Dill, Jr.; E. E. Lee, Director, Traffic & Commerce, State Ports 
Authority; O. W. Faison, N. C. Dept. Agriculture, Robert Darden, Freight 
Traffic Manager, Southern Rail Road Co., New Bern: W. W. Faison, Grain 

Grading Section, N. C. Dept. of 
Agriculture and T. E. Nichols, Jr., 
Grain Marketing Specialist, Agricul- 
ture Extension Service, N. C. State 
College. 

On the left, below the circular 
picture, Harry McCallister, Super- 
intendent for P. R. Markley, Grain 
Buyers, Philadelphia, speeds the un- 
loading proceedings. 

Center, above; Fred Webb, Presi- 
dent of Fred Webb, Inc., Green- 
ville, watches the loading-out. The 
new operation, known as the Caro- 
lina Grain Company, leases the 
facility from the N. C. State Ports 
Authority. 

Southern Railroad cars rest be- 
side the Trinity in picture at the 
left, above circular picture, pre- 
paratory to unloading. 

(). W. Faison, Grain Grading 
Section, N. C. Dept. of Agriculture, 
upper right, lurestles with new prob- 
lems brought about by the initial 
grain shipment. With Tar Heel 
farmers increasing their individual 
storage capacity from three million 
bushels (in Eastern N. C.) to an 
estimated five million in 1959, it is 
expected that even more grain will 
move through the port. 

Below: The Trinity, with both 
elevator sections leading to her 
hold, accepts the golden flow of 
grain. Much of the grain will find 
its way to the Netherlands and 
Germany. 



AT STATE DOCKS, WILMINGTON 



Special Equipment Helps Scrap Exporters 

AS BUSINESS AT THE TWO NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS INCREASES, SPECIAL 
EQUIPMENT MAKES THE THEME OF "PERSONALIZED SERVICE" NOT JUST ANOTHER 
SLOGAN. IN KEEPING WITH THIS POLICY, THE SWIVEL AND CHUTE FOR SCRAP IRON 
AT STATE DOCKS IS A GREAT TIME-5AVER FOR SHIPPERS. THE OPERATION IS SHOWN 
BELOW. 







The swivel (left) and scrap chute are shown here as they 
were placed near the docks prior to placement aboard ship. 




W h 




The swivel, left, is taken by crane and placed in position 
on top of the hatch, which leads into the hold of the ship. 
The scrap chute, right, is then placed in position. 



Crawler crane, with special electric magnet, unloads the 
scrap from box cars, at left. At the left below, a final 
adjustment is made at the swivel. Below, left and right, 
the electric current is released from the magnet, and 
scrap slides down the chute and into the hold.— (Photo at 
above left by W. M. Shaw. Other photos— Al Smith.) 






i ^m 




STATE PORTS 
AID MANY 
N. C CITIES 



By Alton G. Murchison 



FOR NATURAL GAS PROJECT. State Ports Authority 
workmen at the Wilmington docks unload a shipment of 
steel pipe from the cargo ship S. S. Skrim. The pipe will be 
used by North Carolina Natural Gas Corp. in the con- 
struction of a cross-state transmission system. 

(John Browning photo). 



Setting the Pace 
in the Port City 

The Most Progressive Bank 

in the 

South's Most Progressive State 



SECURITY 

NATIONAL BANK 



WILMINGTON 

GREENSBORO, HIGH POINT, BURLINGTON, 
RALEIGH, TARBORO 

"North Carolina's Largest National Bank" 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 
MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP. 



FAYETTEVILLE-Two cargo ships laden with a 
total of approximately 4,000 tons of steel pipe con- 
signed to North Carolina Natural Gas Corporation 
cleared the port of entry at Wilmington and moved 
into the state docks for unloading by State Ports 
Authority stevedores. 

Volney H. Kyle, Jr., executive vice-president of 
N. C. Natural Gas, which has headquarters here, said 
the vessels— one from England and the other from 
Germany— delivered sizeable orders of twelve and 
three quarters inches and four and one half inches 
steel pipe. 

He said the larger pipe is to be used in the con- 
struction of cross-state transmission lines which will 
bring natural gas into 31 central and eastern North 
Carolina communities for the first time. The smaller 
pipe will go into building some urban systems. 

The pipe will be requisitioned from Wilmington as 
needed and shipped to designated points along the 
new natural gas line route. Some of it will go to N. C. 
Natural's coating yards where the mains will be given 
a protective coating of asphalt and glass fibre. 

Other shipments from numerous suppliers are sched- 
uled to move into the area via both rail and water 
during the busy installation period ahead. 

Contractors for the mammoth 600-mile installation 
project are making final preparations for full scale 
operations, which, Kyle surmised, would begin with 
ditch-digging activities at intermittent points along 
the rights-of-way. 

The huge pipeline network will tie into Transcon- 
tinental Pipeline at a take-off point near Mooresville 
from which N. C. Natural's major eastern artery will 
extend 195 miles to Wilmington, and another major 
lateral will head northeastward from Lumberton via 
Fayetteville to pipeline terminals in Rocky Mount, 
Tarboro, New Bern and Washington. 







p~- Av^-— " j4g 



'It" \ 




r-flfcV^Slk 



VIA STATE PORTS 

Furniture Manufacturers 
Use More Lumber 

Realizing the need for more adequate lumber handling 

facilities, the N. (.'.. Stale Ports Authority has recently 
authorized expenditures to prepare hardstands for hand- 
ling lumber. 

Increased imports through Ocean Terminals at More head 
City and State Docks, Wilmington, of genuine Honduras 
mahogany by such firms as Robinson Lumber Company 
(above, left) and of Virola lumber by Taylor Lumber Com- 
pany (above, right) has necessitated the expansion program. 
Increased exports of native woods has also been a factor. 
Among the exporters are Continental 'Limbers. Inc., More- 
head City, headed by Waller H. Ztnglemann. Mr. Zingle- 
mann is shown here (at right) as he inspected some of his 
soon-to-be-exported cargo at Ocean Terminals in Morehead 
City. 

The lumber cargoes move from Morehead City and Wilm- 
ington by rail and truck, (below) to furniture factories in 
Piedmont N. C. 





Central American I'nola lumber, brought to the N. C. 
State Doc lis by I he' vessel GRANADA, is destined for use 
by North Carolina furniture manufacturers. The lirola 
also moves through Ocean Terminals at Morehead City in 
the same manner. 




SOUTH ATLANTIC LINE 

Regular service between North Carolina Ports and Ireland. 
United Kingdom, and North Continental Europe will call at 
Baltic and Scandinavian ports when sufficient cargo offers. 




AMERICAN PIONEER LINE 

South Atlantic Ports direct to Honolulu, Yokohama, 
Manila, Keelung, Kobe and other Far East ports. 

• 

AGENTS 
Wilmington Shipping Co. — Phone RO 2-3381 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Morehead City Shipping Co. — Phone PA 6-4651 

Morehead City, N. C. 

• 

UNITED STATES LINES CO. 



NEW YORK 4, N. Y. 



DIGBY 4-5800 



OCEAN TERMINALS, MOREHEAD CITY 



New Construction 




Shown here is a part of the new 90,000 square foot warehouse soon to be completed at Ocean Terminals in 
Morehead City. Other construction will include a water tank, and additional railroad facilities. 

(Charles McNeil photo). 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT 

INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 




Additional construction is being carried out at state docks 
in Wilmington. Above are some, of the pilings being driven 
for one of the tivo new berths which will eventually be 
500 feet each. Construction for the 120,000 square foot 
transit shed and the large open berth will begin in the 
fall of 1959. 



D. Leon Williams 

DIRECTOR'S REPORT 



"The outlook for 1959 of the North Carolina State 
Ports Authority is most encouraging. During the last five 
months of 1958, one new regular sailing was added each 
month to the existing services at Wilmington State Docks 
and Ocean Terminals in Morehead City. 

"Construction under way at Wilmington State Docks 
will add two new modern berths and one large transit shed. 
Construction af a new large warehouse at Morehead City 
will be completed this month, in addition to other major 
capital improvements af the Ocean Terminals property. 

"During the year 1958, Carolina Grain Company com- 
pleted a modern grain handling facility at Morehead City. 
This new grain facility will greatly increase tonnages and 
bring many new ships to our docks. 

"It is noted with interest the great increase in general 
cargo at both of North Carolina's Deep Water terminals 
which increased in 1958 by 20 per cent. 

"Greater state-wide interest in N. C. port development 
has been evidenced in 1958. Chairman John M. Reeves 
scheduled several of the monthly meetings of the Authority 
in western cities of our state. As a result, in addition to the 
coastal and Raleigh meetings, the Authority held meetings 
in High Point and Asheville. This action has proved so 
successful in bringing the Port Authority story to the in- 
dustrial area of the state that in 1959 many regular 
meetings will be held in the central and western part of 
North Carolina. 

"North Carolina's deep water terminals, berth for berth, 
are modern in every respect and the auxiliary facilities, 
such as heavy lift gantry cranes and fumigation plants are 
unexcelled. 

"Each month we note that more and more exporters and 
importers in the state are capitalizing on the economic 
value of the state-owned docks at both Wilmington and 
Morehead City." 



In a special feature story published by the Wilming- 
ton Star-News newspapers on Sunday, December 
28th, the position of the Wilmington Harbor in the 
South Atlantic was graphically presented. The salient 
points of this story follows: 

According to 1957 figures released by the U. S. 
Army Corps of Engineers, Wilmington had at least 
half a million tons more commerce than either of its 
two larger immediate rival ports in South Carolina 
and Georgia— Charleston and Savannah. 

Figures are contained in the booklet, "Waterborne 
Commerce in the United States", issued by the Corps 
of Engineers. 

The Wilmington Harbor had shipping traffic 
amounting to 4,752,777 tons— greatly outstripping her 
two southernmost competitors tonnagewise. Savannah 



totaled 4,210,429 tons and Charleston had 4,115,-552 
tons. Greatest tonnage resulted from petroleum, motor 
fuel, kerosene, asphalt, and distillate and residual fuel 
oil. Pulpwood, iron and scrap metal were next, and 
tobacco was also an important item. 

Immediately following the special Wilmington 
Star-News story, came a release from the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Commerce with offices in Greensboro. The 
report showed that North Carolina went against the 
national trend during the first eight months of 19.58 by 
increasing exports by 61 per cent. For the rest of the 
nation, there was a 17 per cent decline in exports for 
the same period. 

Commenting editorially, the Wilmington News said 
that "there is much to be proud of in being port num- 
ber 2 (in the South Atlantic) because it reflects the 
big strides made in harbor growth and activity. It is 
also another evidence of proof that expansion and im- 
provement along the waterfront, and the State Docks 
in particular, are completely justifiable." 




If you've 
got it... a truck 

brought it ! 




YES, TO YOUR VERY DOOR 

FROM SHIPSIDE 

To your very door 

BY TRUCK 

The N. C. Trucking Industry ««rves the fine North Caro- 
lina Ports. Trucks serve everyone — especially the more 
than 1800 Tar Heel communities entirely dependent on 
Trucks for everything to eat. wear, use and sell. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Trucking Industry Building Raleigh. N. C. 




Kobayashi Ruffin Nakatsukasa Thomason Williams Gray 
NEW SHIPPING SERVICE-Officials of the North Caro- 
lina State Ports Authority, Daido Line and Wilmington 
Shipping Co. met aboard the MS Kotei Maru January 13 
for informal ceremonies beginning the new, regularly 
scheduled services from State Docks to the Far East. One 
ship per month is presently scheduled. Pictured above 
(front row) are: K. Kobayashi, N. Y. Representative of 
Daido Line; Capt. R. Nakatsukasa, master of the M.S. 
Kotei Maru; D. Leon Williams, Executive Director, State 
Ports Authority. Back Roiv: Peter B. Ruffin, president of 
Wilmington Shipping Co.; Bonner Thomason, president of 
Thomason Corp., Fayetteville; William O. Gray, A. L. 
Burbank ir Co., Ltd., general agents for Daido Line. 

Photo by Ben McDonald, WECT (TV) 



SHIP LAUNDRY 

AND DRY CLEANING 

One Day Service 

• 

IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 
CLEANERS, INC. 

FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE RO 2-6651 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction 

of Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and 

Bridges and Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara). Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK, N. Y. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE — WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 

GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and 

to abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, 

dolphins, rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State 
docks at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 



World Trade... 

And You ! 



Burlap from Pakistan, Mahogany from Hon- 
duras, Caseing from Argentina, nails and toys 
from Germany, Tea from India and perfume from 
France. So you think these things mean nothing 
to you? You don't live near a port, so why worry 
about "World Trade." 

The impact of WORLD TRADE is basic to the 
vitality of every North Carolinian, as well as Ten- 
nessee and Kentucky. People in this area who have 
never seen a ship depend daily upon water borne 
transportation — much of it through North Caro- 
lina ports. 

In one North Carolina city alone, the annual 
volume is $13 million worth of exports and $10 
million worth of imports. On our farms, through- 
out the Nation, 1/10 of the commodities produced 
is destined for overseas ports. In North Carolina's 
tobacco country, about 1/3 of the flue-cured crop 
will reach consumers outside the United States. 

But you don't raise tobacco? Perhaps not, but 
526,000 persons in North Carolina do work on 
farms, and in 1957-58 the state's agricultural 
exports exceeded $186.7 million. 

Perhaps you're the man who is employed in 
manufacturing or by a manufacturing firm. If so, 
you have 365,000 fellow workers, who, with you, 
exported products worth over $186.9 million dur- 
ing the same period last year. 

In one of our larger North Carolina cities, 1,000 
people are employed as a direct result of foreign 
commerce. Thus you see that without exports, 
North Carolina would have to shut down many of 
its plants. 

World Trade, then, is your concern. And, each 
year, as increasing tonnages move through the 
North Carolina ports of Morehead City and Wil- 
mington, your stake in the development of these 
two ports increases. 



Hulls 



. O. BOX 897 
RO 2-7721 



Cargoes 



Yachts 




ESTABLISHED 
1878 



Protection &■ Indemnity 
All Other Marine & Overseas Coverages 



10 



VISITORS . . . 



MT. AIRY, N. C. VISITORS: The ducks weren't flying, and their plane couldn't take 
them home, so a delegation of MT. AIRY VISITORS enjoyed their first trip to Ocean 
Terminals Morehead, recently. They watched the first grain loading aboard the 
Trinity and toured the 725 foot ship with Captain C. Vagianos. Present on the tour 
were H. R. Inman, Jr., Leonard J. Parker, K. W. Pulliom, L. P. Wrenn, Jr., and 
Bobby Watson. 





Above (picture.', 1 and 2) are visitors of one of the new, 
regularly scheduled steamship services, The Ozean-Stinnes 
Lines. They are, from lejt to right, Miss Petersen, Mr. 
Schuldt (Hasselburg owner) and Mrs. Schuldt. Below is 
Mr. Schuldt and Captain Kiltler (right). 

Above, (far right) from left to right: John M. Reeves, 
Chairman, N. C. State Ports Authority; J. Edgar Kirk, 
Secretary-Treasurer, State Ports Authority; Colonel Henry 
C. Rowland, Wilmington District, Corps of Engineers and 



W. F. liabcock. Chairman, N. C. State Highway Com- 
mission. The problem: Where and how should a bridge be 
developed between Morehead City and Beaufort so that 
shipping can expand in the years ahead? The State Highway 
and the State Ports Authority are presently making plans 
to survey the situation. The meeting of the above took 
place in Morehead City in November when representatives 
met to discuss the problem. 





% DESIGNERS & 

BUILDERS 

FLOATING CRANES 

TUGS • BARGES 

DREDGES • FLOATING 

INDUSTRIAL PLANTS 




TRAVELING GANTRIES 
WHIRLY CRANES 



Ocean Steamship Terminals P. O. Box 647, Savannah, Ga. 



"It's this ii'ay, boys," says "Dcgee" Bell, (above left) State 
Representath'e from Morehead City to Charles W. Gowl, 
Asst. V. P.. Traffic . Southern Railway. John M. Reeves, 
Chairman, X . C. State Ports Authority and W. ,\J. King. V. 
P., Southern Railway at their meeting in Morehead City 
recently. The young lady serving coffee was unidentified. 
The meeting ot cured at a banquet given by Southern 
Railway offit mis. 

It was a fine day in December . {above right) especially 
aftei the Virola lumbei had been given stamp of approval 
by customs, the buyer, and the shipping company. Shown 
here discussing the problems of international trade are. 
left to right: Bill Danes. Morehead City Shipping Company; 

/. /). Taylor, Tayloi Lumber Company . Lynchburg, la.. R. 

/•.'. Walton, U. S. Customs and Walt I- nedei ichs. Operations- 
Manager, Ocean Terminals, Morehead City. 



CAROLINA FORWARDING 
CORPORATION 

FMB 2309 

International 

Freight Forwarders 

and 

Customhouse Brokers 

• 

"Personalized Service" 



WILMINGTON MOREHEAD CITY 

Telephone RO 3-5161 Telephone PA 6-5080 



Let us 
serve you 

in the 

Port! 



You can depend on WS&T 
for all your banking in the 
Port of Wilmington. 

This is the bank that knows 
and grows with growers, 
manufacturers, shippers 
and merchants. Let us serve 
you with complete banking 
especially tailored to your 
Port requirements! 




North 
Carolina's 
Port 
Bank 



Wilmington 
Savings & Trust 
Company 

Member Federal Reserve System 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



HOW'S YOURS? 

NAUTICAL I. Q. 

The FOLLOWING ARE STANDARD SYMBOLS 
USED ON NAVIGATION CHARTS: You're a land- 
lubber for sure if you can't read most of them. An- 
swers found on page 16. Consult only after writing in 
answers below. All residents of Morehead and Wil- 
mington are expected to make "100". 





A small number of a recent shipment of Vauxhalls as they 
arrived in Wilmington at N. C. State Docks. The imports of 
foreign autos has steadily increased through N. C. ports in 
recent months. 



12 




TRADE LEADS 



Import Opportunities 

Alcoholic Beverages: 

Italy— STIV1S (Stabilimenti Industriali Vini Imbot- 
tigliata Siciliani ) ( producer, wholesaler, exporter of 
wines), 301 Via Umberto, Catania, wishes to export 
direct or through agent 10,000 bottles and 5,000 flasks 
monthly of red and white Sicilian table wines— alco- 
holic content of 12.5 c /< to 13*/^; also rose wine with 
alcoholic content of 137' to 14%. 

Foodstuffs: 

Spain— J. Valeriano Gonzalex, S.L. (VALGOSA) 
(exporter and commission agent), Ricardo Castro 4, 
Albacete, wishes to export garlic, saffron, aniseed, 
melons, onions, etc.; also agricultural machinery. 

New Zealand— Prepared Foods Limited (manufac- 
turer and wholesaler of frozen foods, including fruit 
pies, casseroles, dog mixes, potato straws and crisps, 
pastry, and related food items ) , P.O. Box 942, Palmer- 
ston North, wishes to export prepacked frozen meats, 
including hamburgers, veal patties, and boneless beef. 

Housewares: 

Germany— Gustav Eichenwald (manufacturer, ex- 
porter of metal, rubber, and plastic articles), 11 Dan- 
ziger Strasse, Neuss a. Rh., wishes to export direct or 
through agent large quantities of folding ladders of 
steel tubing, white enamel, chromium plated bend, 
and rubber covered steps. 

Nursery Stock: 

France— Ets. J. D. Van der Putte and Sons (pro- 
ducer and exporter of bulbs), Route de St. Gilles, 
Nimes, Gard, wishes to export direct large quantities 
of paperwhite and grandiflora narcissus bulbs in sizes 
ranging from 13 to 14 centimeters in circumference. 

Export Opportunities 

Chemicals: 

Netherlands — Werkplastie, N.V. (manufacturer's 
agent), 31 Geestbrugkade, Rijswijk, Z. H., wishes to 
purchase direct polyethylene compounds in blocks, 
rods, and sheets for the plastic product manufacturing 
industry. 



Foodstuffs: 

British Guiana— E. S. Gillette and Company (im- 
porting distributor, commission agent), 64 Robb and 
King Streets, Georgetown, wishes to purchase direct 
and seeks agency for foodstuffs, especially hard wheal 
flour, dried and fresh fruits, fruit juices, and salted 
and canned fish. 

Hides and Skins: 

Union of South Africa— Voxan (Pty. ) Limited (ex- 
porter of hides and skins), P. O. Box 1193, Port Eliza- 
beth, wishes to purchase direct hides and skins. 

While reasonable precautions have been made by 
the U.S.D.C. which furnishes the above leads, they 
cannot be guaranteed. The North Carolina World 
Trader can receive further assistance by contacting: 
Joel B. New, Business Analyst 
U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. O. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



He ca 




Every Southern Railway sales and service 
representative is a specialist in shipping 
matters. Why not let him help you with 
your overseas shipments to and from the 
South? He will be pleased to serve you! 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 





Shown here is the architect's conception of the two new soon-to-be constructed berths of steel and 
concrete, transit shed (120,000 square feet) and a large paved open berth, at State Docks, Wilm- 
ington. 



WILMINGTON 



N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Al Smith, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing three 500-foot vessels simultaneously, 
with depth of 32 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 square 
feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and mason- 
ry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage of warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

OPEN STORAGE: Three acres of paved open storage, 
easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. Certified weighmasters on 
twenty-four hour duty. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron; also depressed tracks at 
rear of transit sheds and warehouse, entire length. 
Storage yard on property for 240 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes 
for heavy lifts, single or in tandem, and equipped 
for 80-inch magnet work and 2-yard bucket opera- 
tion. 



One 35-ton locomotive crane and one 25-ton loco- 
motive crane. 
Three Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of 
various sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton 
mobile crane. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at the transit sheds 
and warehouse; ramps for easy access into sheds 
and warehouses; portable side and end loading 
ramps for rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumiga- 
tion plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. Export 
crating service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Sea- 
board Air Line Railroad Companies and numerous 
highway motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



14 






J» 




Here is construction at Morehead City, showing 90,000 square foot warehouse, water tank, addi- 
tional railroad facilities. 



MOREHEAD CITY 



N. C. OCEAN TERMINALS 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petro- 
leum tanker, with a depth of 30 feet at mean low 
water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60,000 square 
feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinklers. 

One transit shed, 32,000 square feet, constructed 
of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 
A third transit shed, the newest, is of pre-fabricated 
steel construction with sprinklers and has capacity 
of 40,000 square feet. 

WAREHOUSES: Three storage warehouses, totaling 
178,000 square feet, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: A large open storage area is avail- 
able. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. At- 
lantic and East Carolina Railway freight car storage 
yard adjacent to Port property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 
Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Excellent facilities for loading 
grain in ships or barges. 250 tons/hour capacity. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easy access into transit sheds and 
warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Up-to-date fumigation plant of most 
modern concrete and steel construction is now in 
operation. Large single chamber is of latest design. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supplv at shipside. Served by 
Atlantic and East Carolina Railway Co.. (a whollv- 
owned subsidiary of The Southern Railway System 
One interstate truck line on property, and served by 
numerous highway motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 




ANSWERS TO YOUR 



Have a stogie, friend? You can't, not until its been fumi- 
gated, before shipment, as this was. No, this shipment 
didn't go to Europe, but was turned into the pleasant 
tobacco medium by a domestic firm . . . after shipment 
from Ocean Terminals, Morehead City. 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents - Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

P. O. BOX 249 

TELEPHONES 
PArk 6-4651 PArk 6-4652 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 

Peter B. Ruffin 

President 

W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 

Wade H. Pierce 

Assistant Secretary 



William T. Davies 

Manager 

W. D. Williams 

Secretary 

J. P. Wilson 

Treasurer 

Lemuel L. Doss, Jr. 

Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 376 



PROVISIONS, 
DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 

International Paint 

Socony- Vacuum Oil Co.. Inc. 



Wilmington. N. C. 

Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



NAUTICAL I. Q. 

(Cont'd from page 12) 



® 






CG. 
165 



X 



Rock Awash 
Wreck Above Water 
Coast Guard Station 
Anchorages (Small Vessels) 
Tidal Current-Flood 
Tidal Current-Ebb 
^> Dry Dock 

Dredged Channel 
Mooring 




Williams Nakatsukasa Ruffin 

PORTS DIRECTOR RECEIVES GOOD WILL TO KEN - 

The finest in Japanese hand-made dolls was presented to 
State Ports Director D. Leon Williams at informal cere- 
monies aboard the MS Kotei Maru at State Docks, recently. 
Williams, left, above, receives the doll from Captain R. 
Nakatsukasa, master of the MS Kotei Maru as Peter B. 
Ruffin, president of Wilmington Shipping Co. looks on. 
The ceremony began the new, regular monthly scheduled 
service from State Docks to the Far East. The Director 
accepted the token of good will for the N. C. State Ports 
Authority and welcomed the Captain "to this great port of 
Wilmington which is the greatest in the mid-Atlantic states." 
" Photo by Ben McDonald, WECT (TV) 



16 



AAPA ELECTS WILLIAMS 1ST V. P. 








OFFICERS OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PORTS AUTHORITIES are shown here 
after their election in Hawaii. AAPA President Dudley W. Frost (right) receives a handshake and 
congratulations from First Vice President D. Leon Williams. X. C. State Ports Authority. Con- 
gratulations are also extended by Second Vice President Howard W. Quinn, Peru, anil H . j. 
Caughlin, California, third vice president. 

PHOTO AND STORY INFORMATION FURNISHED BY THE HONOLULU ADVERTISER. 



In line for the presidency of the American Associa- 
tion of Port Authorities is D. Leon Williams, Executive 
Director, North Carolina State Ports Authority. 

William's election to the position of First Vice 
President came on September 19th at the 47th annual 
convention of AAPA which met in Honolulu. Dudley 
W. Frost, Executive Director of the Port of Oakland 
(Calif.) took office as president. He succeeds Peter 
J. McCulloch of Hamilton, Ont, Canada. 

The election of Mr. Williams to this position in the 
organization hrings honor to North Carolina when it 
is realized that the AAPA consists of puhlic port 
operators in Canada, the U. S., Central and South 
America, the Carihhean and Hawaii. 

Part of Mr. Williams duties in the AAPA has 
consisted of serving on both the planning and resolu- 
tions committee. Among resolutions approved by the 
delegates at the Hawaii convention were: 

• 1. Support of privately owned and operated inter- 
coastal and coastwise Merchant Marine, required 
for national defense. 

2. Opposed Federal levy on toll collection on water- 
borne commerce or vessels for the use of harbors, 
channels or waterways within the territori.il boun- 
daries of any state except those involved in agreement 
with another country. 



3. Approved supervision by the U. S. Coast Guard 
in the transfer and storage of explosives at non-mili- 
tary marine terminals and also on board vessels at 
such terminals in U. S. Ports. The AAPA also re- 
quested legislation to enable the Coast Guard to 
supervise harbor transfer between ship-and-shore of 
certain explosives. 

Next year's convention will be held in West Palm 
Beach, Florida. The I960 gathering is slated for 
Montreal, Canada. The 1961 meet will be in Long 
Beach when AAPA and Long Beach Harbor Depart- 
ment will both observe 50th anniversaries. 1962 may 
see the convention back in Honolulu. 

Among the delegates to the convention were specia- 
lists in every branch of port development, manage- 
ment, operation and maintenance. The exchange of 
ideas and opinions made at the convention will have 
far reaching effects on the economic life of the coun- 
tries they serve and on the smooth How of their ocean 
commerce to and from the rest of the world. 

Mr. Williams is also Chairman. South Atlantic Ports 
Committee on Increased Membership, American Asso- 
ciation ol Ports Authorities, and a member, Finance 
Committee, South Atlantic and Caribbean Ports 
Association. 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

Suit 220, Education Bldg. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



«™c AR0IraasTATEUBRABr 

SLEIGH, N.c^ 



BULK RATE 
U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Permit No. 32 



FORM 3547 REQUESTED 



\ .J * / 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 




For Economy • Efficiency • Speed . 

mm 

. Ship via the Mid-South Short Way 




North Carolina State Ports Authority 




N. C. Ocean Terminals at 

MOREHEAD CITY 



N. C State Docks at 

WILMINGTON 



Charles McNeil, Artist-Illustrator 



N. 



'Oc 



Nor* Carojna Slate LSbf^Y 



STATE PORTS 



Famous Hatteras Light House 



North Carolina State Ports A 




N. C. Ocean Terminals at 

MOREHEAD CITY 




APRIL, 1959 



HEIDE AND CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 




WILMINGTON, N. C. 

TELEPHONE ROger 3-8271 
And 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

TELEPHONE PArk 6-5080 or PArk 6-3652 



PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 

W. D. WILLIAMS 

Secretary 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Assistant Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Vice-President 

J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 

LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 



LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 
Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Telephone RO 2-3381 WILSHIPCO 

Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Page 

Carolina Forwarding Corporation 15 

Carteret Towing Co. 4 

Diamond Manufacturing Co. 16 

Durant, O. E., Ship Chandler 3 

First Citizens Bank & Trust Co. Inside Back Cover 

Greenheart (Demerara) Inc. 12 

Heide & Company Inside Front Cover 

Ideal Laundry & Dry Cleaners, Inc. 13 

Maersk Line 7 

Morehead City Shipping Co. 10 

N. C. Motor Carriers Association 13 

Security National Bank 5 

United States Lines Company 3 

Walker Taylor Insurance 10 

The Bank of Wilmington 6 

Wilmington Shipping Co. Inside Front Cover 







Forty tons of N. C. grown chicken (frozen) are loaded aboard 
the S/S Kinderdyk. This shipment represents one of the fastest 
growing agricultural industries in North Carolina and the fastest 
growing broiler state in the Nation. Priebe & Sons, Concord, 
N. C, made the shipment. 

American exports of frozen chickens, mostly ready-to-cook 
broilers, totaled 30,000,000 pounds during 1958, an increase 
of 20 per cent over 1957. In North Carolina, 134 million 
broilers were processed in 1958. Seventy-five per cent of this 
amount was sent out of state. From 1956 to 1958 the dollar 
value from North Carolina broilers has jumped $26,447,000 for 
a total income from this source of $160,000,000. In 1950, 
there were 28,000,000 broilers raised in North Carolina, while 
in 1958 134,000,000 were produced. 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



Executive Offices 
Suite 220 Education Building 

P. O. Box 2185 

TeLTEmpIe 4-5611 Ext. 7335 

Raleigh, N. C. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

JOHN M. REEVES. Chairman 

WILLIAM C;. CLARK, JR., 

Vice-Chairman 

COLLIER COBB, JR. 

KIRKVVOOD F. ADAMS 

ROBERT L. EICHELBERGER 

CHARLES D. GRAY 

EARL N. PHILLIPS 

J. EDGAR KIRK, Secretary-Treasurer 



D. LEON WILLIAMS 

Executive Director 



E. E. LEE, JR., Director, 
Commerce ir Traffic 
H. C. JACKSON, Traffic Manager 
R. A. De VANE, Assistant Treasurer- 
Comptroller 
LEWIS H . LAWRENCE, 
Public Relations Director 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
H. N. LARCOMBE, Representative 

NEW YORK OFFICE 

Suite 3903, 233 Broadway 

New York 7, N. Y. 

R Ector 2-3760 

JOHN C. VANDEGRIFF, Representative 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

N. C. State Docks 

P, O. Box 1619— Telephone 

ROger 3-1622 

TWX: WM 77 

AL C. SMITH 
Operations Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

N. C. Ocean 'terminals 

P. O. Box 507— Telephone PArk 6-3159 
TWX: Morehead City, N. C. 8782 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS 
Operations Manager 



OFFICIALPUBLICATIONOFN.C.S P \ 



April, 1959 



Vol \ No 2 



Correspondence concerning THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
PORTS magazine should be addressed to: Lewis H. I.awreiue, Editor, 
North Carolina Stat( Ports, Suite 220, Education Building, Raleigh, 
N. C. 



CONTENTS 

Customs Efficiency 

Australian Wool for N. C. Textile Industry 
Tugs Tow Mighty Transports .. 

New Construction 

Heavy Machinery to Central America .. 



Page 
2 
3 

l 

5 
6 



Trade Leads . 

Port Facilities 8-9 

Seed Potatoes for Carolina Farmers 10 

Visitors - - - — - 1 1 

Staff Meeting 12 



Oil— For N. C. and Foreign Ports 

State Ports— Fastest Crowing in the South Atlantic 

Trilisia Odoratissima - 



.13 

14 
L5 



SPA Appoints N. Y. Representative 



iside Back Cover 



COVER 

Envisioned by Executive Director D. Leon Williams; Art 
work by Charles McNeill, Assistant Operations Manager, 
Ocean Terminals, and executed by the Editor. 




ML* 


n 


1 






Ik 




Mr. R. E. Walton, Customs Inspector, takes final check of 
approximately 65,000 bags of seed potatoes which came 
through Morehead City's Ocenan Terminals. 



Above right — from left to right: Mr. Harry Sink, Ed Bradford 
(dark glasses), H. W. Williamson, Frank Ramsey and unidenti- 
fied Scout hear Chief Customs Collector Josiah Maultsby, right, 
explain to the Raleigh visitors (and 35 Explorer Scouts in the 
background) just how a Customs office functions. This gather- 
ing at State Docks is just one of the extra civic duties the men 
of Customs are called on to perform. Mr. H. W. Sass, Chief 
Customs Inspector, left above, just before he sets up the proce- 
dure for inspecting the first shipment of wool through State 
Docks. 



The efficiency with which cargo moves across a deep water port depends upon many 
factors. One of these factors is the Bureau of Customs, and Ocean Terminals at More- 
head City and State Docks at Wilmington are fortunate in having especially efficient 
Customs personnel thoroughly familiar with their work. 



North Carolina is designated as Customs Collection 
District No. 15, with headquarters port at Wilmington. 
Interestingly, there are designated subports in inland 
N. C. at Winston-Salem, Durham, Reidsville, Elkin, 
Elizabeth City, Beaufort and a customs station at 
Washington, N. C. Morehead City, by Customs desig- 
nation, is also a subport. In other than deep water 
ports, the principal customs function is handling im- 
ports which are stored in bonded warehouses. Duties 
are paid on these imports at the time of their with- 
drawal for use in manufacturing. 

Before we illustrate how customs perform when 
"your ship comes in", you should know that the head- 
quarters port is staffed by first, a "COLLECTOR 
OF CUSTOMS", Josiah A. Maultsby, St., who is the 
principal customs officer of the Customs District. His 
staff at Wilmington includes an assistant collector, 

Keith K. "Pappy" Kimmel, Inspector, left below, keeps a weath- 
er eye on proceedings as a ship unloads at dockside. Right 
below, they do retire! James E. Townsend, left, takes over the 
position of Assistant Customs Collector from E. C. Sneed, right. 




E. C. Sneed, an appraiser, entry officer, liquidator, ac- 
countant and marine division. 

So the day finally arrives! Your ship comes in! The 
ship is boarded by a CUSTOMS INSPECTOR, who 
examines the manifest (cargo list). The INSPECTOR 
obtains an oath from the SHIP'S MASTER that such 
manifest contains a full and complete description of 
all cargo, sea stores, and crew purchases on board. 

At the time of boarding, the INSPECTOR also de- 
termines the particular cargo which is to be discharg- 
ed. If the cargo is subject to a "DUTY", he main- 
tains supervision over the vessel during its discharge 
and releases merchandise upon authority from the 
Customs Office. 

Customs men work closely with the Shipping Agents 
and freight forwarders in their respective locality. 
Generally, it is the agent who handles certain docu- 
ments with the ENTRY DIVISION in the CUSTOM- 
HOUSE and pay for their client the estimated duties 
which might accrue on a particular cargo. The AP- 
PRAISER examines all merchandise to determine its 
proper classification and establishes a customs value 
from the documents submitted. After the estimated 
duties have been paid and the examination made, the 
INSPECTOR receives his authority to release the 
merchandise to the importer. 

Another item of procedure is that the MASTER of 
a ship, shortly after arriving in port, make formal 
entry of his vessel in the MARINE DIVISION of 
Customs by paying his tonnage tax and navigation fees 
and executing certain other oaths required under the 
law. After all cargo is discharged, the master is then 
required to CLEAR his vessel for the next port. 




AUSTRALIAN 
WOOL FOR 
TEXTILE 
INDUSTRY 



Checker W. E. Rich (left) is shown making count of the bales of Australian wool which arrived at State Docks in February. It was 
the first wool shipment in the history of the State Ports Authority, (right) The wool bales are loaded from the warehouse directly 
into waiting rail cars. 

The first shipment of Australian wool in the history of the Ports Authority arrived at the State 
Docks in Wilmington on February 24. Discharged from the S. S. Pioneer Gem, 2,880 hales were 
loaded into rail cars and trucks for textile plants in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and 
Georgia. Much of the wool was for plants of Burlington Industries. 

For shipments which were to leave the warehouse immediately, the customs inspectors took 
core samples with power-driven augers and evaluated the wool for duty. 

William Fayle, Burlington Industries Transportation Director, said all details in connection 
with the shipment for his company were handled satisfactorily at the Wilmington port. "With so 
many of our plants located in North Carolina, we naturally are interested in having deep water ship- 
ping accessible to those plants," he stated. "It would certainly appear that with continued devel- 
opment of the port facilities much greater use can be made, which should have a healthy effect on 
the economy of North Carolina and its industry." 




W. F. Quinlivan checks the 
wool bales again before they 
are loaded for shipment. 



PROVISIONS, 
DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Socony-Vacuum Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO 2 4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC LINE 

Regular service between North Carolina Ports and Ireland. 
United Kingdom, and North Continental Europe will call at 
Baltic and Scandinavian ports when sufficient cargo offers. 




AMERICAN PIONEER LINE 

Manila, Keelung, Kobe and other Far East ports. 

• 

AGENTS 
Wilmington Shipping Co. — Phone RO 2-3381 

Wilmington. N. C. 

Morehead City Shipping Co.— Phone PA 6-4651 
Morehead City, N. C. 



UNITED STATES LINES CO. 

NEW YORK 4, N. Y. DIGBY 4-5800 



TUGS TOW MIGHTY TRANSPORTS 





Tugs (above left) move out at "Crack-o-Dawn," and head for Morehead City's 
Ocean Terminals. "Heaving a line", (sscond from left) the tug crew prepares 
to pull her transport away from the dock. Sometimes two are better than one, 
(second from right) and when two are needed, either the Wilmington tugs or 
Morehead City tugs are on hand for the job. (right) Experienced ship's pilots 
have given the North Carolina ports an excellent reputation in the South 
Atlantic. 



\V^ WITH 
CARTERET . . . 




. . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 



Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 
CAPTAIN CHARLIE PINNER, 



PA 6-5440 



They're stronger than 900 horses but so gentle the 
heaviest freighters are snugly and safely nestled at 
Ocean Terminals in Morehead City and State Docks, 
Wilmington. 

Along the South Atlantic, confidence is a tradition 
when it comes to tugs— especially those operated by 
Captain Charlie Pinner at Radio Island, Morehead 
City and R. D. and R. H. Stone and Jack Greene, 
Wilmington. 

Legend has it that Captain Charlie Pinner started 
his CARTERET TOWING COMPANY on a dare, 
while R. D. and R. H. Stone of the STONE TOWING 
LINE are third generation in the towing business. 
A comparative newcomer is Jack Greene of the 
CAPE FEAR TOWING COMPANY, of which Ed 
Orrell is owner ( for 20 years ) . 

Tides, currents and legends for the tug captains are 
different at the North Carolina Ports, but all admit 
that life is never dull. Where the shippers are con- 
cerned, the experience and good reputation of both 
tugs and SHIP'S PILOTS places the two ports in an 
enviable position along the South Atlantic. The ex- 
cellent and safe handling of the mighty transports 
through the years has proved their worth to North 
Carolina and her State Ports. 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 





Above is the newly completed 90,000 square foot warehouse ot 
Ocean Terminals in Morehead City. Below is an interesting 
pattern created by steel and concrete as work progresses on the 
two soon-to-be completed berths at State Docks, Wilmington. 




Setting the Pace 
in the Port City 

The Most Progressive Bank 

in the 

South's Most Progressive State 



SECURITY 

NATIONAL BANK 



WILMINGTON 

GREENSBORO, HIGH POINT, BURLINGTON, 
RALEIGH, TARBORO 

"North Ccolma's Largest Notional Bonk " 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 
MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP 



VIA OCEAN TERMINALS 




HEAVY MACHINERY TO CENTRAL AMERICA 



A complete rock-crushing plant shipped out of Ocean 
Terminals recently. It moved with real dispatch aboard 
the Ferdinanstor early in February. The rock-crush- 
ing plant was shipped under the supervision of New 
Bern's Hugh H. Byrd, of Nello L. Teer Construction 
Company, Durham. 



THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT 

INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



The huge equipment was shipped to Cornito, 
Nicaragua, via the Panama Canal. The machinery 
was loaded by crawler crane for delivery to the Cen- 
tral American Corporation, a branch of Nello Teer 
Company. (Part of the loading operation is shown at 
left and right above) 

In the center picture, Hugh Byrd, of Nello Teer 
Company, left, and Bill Davies, Wilmington Shipping 
Co., right, supervise the loading operation. 

Below, a part of the machinery is lowered into the 
hold of the Ferdinanstor. 





LEADS 



our: 



Import Opportunities 



Alcoholic Beverages: 

France— Cave des Vignerons de .Laudun ( producer 
& exporter), Laudun, Card, wishes to export direct 
white wine known as "Cotes du Rhone Laudun", in 
bottles of .75 liters. 

Fats and Oils: 

Netherlands-G. S. Kievit, N. V. (export merchant), 
21 Westersingel, Rotterdam, wishes to export direct 
or through one or two agents well versed in the oils 
and fats trade, all kinds of oils, fats, and acid oils 
of animal and vegetable origin; also, fish oil, whale 
oil, and sperm oil. 

Hardware, Building: 

Ztaty-Giuseppe Mare' (manufacturer), Via Molini 
Trotti 11, Varese, wishes to export direct or through 
agent 3,000,000 lire worth monthly of door and cabinet 
hardware. Catalogue, price list, and samples available. 
Motor Vehicles and Accessories: 

Gcrmflny-Mielewerke AG. (manufacturer), Gueter- 
sloh? Westf., wishes to export direct or through agent 
motorcycles and motor scooters knows as "Miele 
Moped". Illustrated and descripitive leaflets available. 

Timber: 

Thailand— Sawmill Association of Siam (export as- 
sociation ) , 75 Sawmill Association Lane, North Sathorn 
Road, Bangkok, wishes to export direct or through 
agent teak, yand, and other timber. 

Wool: 

Italy— Antonio La Torre (importer, wholesaler) 
55/57 Via Ugo Bassi, Messina, Sicily, wishes to export 
raw or cleaned wool for mattresses; also fleece. 

Export Opportunities 

Clothing: 

Saudi Arabia— Ali Abdulla Karime (general mer- 
chant, commission agent, co contractor), P. O. Box 
352, Prior Road, Manama, Bahrain, wishes to purchase 
direct wearing apparel for men and women. 
Foodstuffs: 

Germany— Konsum-Anstalt Fried. Krupp (importing 
distributor), 10 Ostelfeldstrasse, Essen, wishes to pur- 
chase direct poultry of all kinds. 



Italy— Caetano Nasta (wholesaler, agent), 22/A 
Via Rosolino Pilo, Palermo, Sicily, wishes to purchase 
direct and seeks agency for wheat Hour. 

Netherlands— \V. Bunge & Co. (importing distribu- 
tor), 93 Wijnhaven, Rotterdam, wishes to purchase 
direct and seeks agency for all kinds of branded 
packaged foodstuffs from U. S. manufacturers. 

Agency Opportunities 

Paper: 

Italy— Caetano Nasta (wholesaler, agent), 22 A 
Via Rosolino Pilo, Palermo, Sicily, wishes to purchase 
direct and seeks agency for wrapping paper. 

While reasonable precautions have been made by 
the U.S.D.C. which furnishes the above leads, they 
cannot be guaranteed. The North Carolina World 
Trader can receive further assistance by contacting: 
Joel B. New, Business Analyst 
U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. O. Box 1950, Room 108 
Post Office BldR. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Moreheac City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kony, Formosa, 

Japan, Korea, Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE & CO., INC. 

109 South Sixth Street 

Morehead City, N. C. 

Telephone PArk 6-5080 01 PArk 6-3652 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agontj 
30 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 




Shown here is the architect's conception of the two new soon-to-be constructed berths of steel and 
concrete, transit shed (120,000 square feet) and a large paved open berth, at State Docks, Wilm- 
ington. 



WILMINGTON 



N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Al Smith, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing three 500-foot vessels simultaneously, 
with depth of 32 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 square 
feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and mason- 
ry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage of warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

OPEN STORAGE: Three acres of paved open storage, 
easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. Certified weighmasters on 
twenty-four hour duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron; also depressed tracks at 
rear of transit sheds and warehouse, entire length. 
Storage yard on property for 240 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes 
for heavy lifts, single or in tandem, and equipped 
for 80-inch magnet work and 2-yard bucket opera- 
tion. 



One 35-ton locomotive crane and one 25-ton loco- 
motive crane. 
Three Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of 
various sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton 
mobile crane. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at the transit sheds 
and warehouse; ramps for easy access into sheds 
and warehouses; portable side and end loading 
ramps for rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumiga- 
tion plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. Export 
crating service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Sea- 
board Air Line Railroad Companies and numerous 
highway motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



8 




Here is construction at Morehead City, showing 90,000 square foot warehouse, water tank, addi- 
tional railroad facilities. 



MOREHEAD CITY 



N. C. OCEAN TERMINALS 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petro- 
leum tanker, with a depth of 30 feet at mean low 
water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60,000 square 
feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinklers. 

One transit shed, 32,000 square feet, constructed 
of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 
A third transit shed, the newest, is of pre-fabricated 
steel construction with sprinklers and has capacity 
of 40,000 square feet. 

WAREHOUSES: Three storage warehouses, totaling 
178,000 square feet, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORACE: A large open storage area is avail- 
able. 

TRACKACE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. At- 
lantic and East Carolina Railway freight car storage 
yard adjacent to Port property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 
Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Excellent facilities for loading 
grain in ships or barges. 250 tons hour capacity. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easy access into transit sheds and 
warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Up-to-date fumigation plant of most 
modern concrete and steel construction is now in 
operation. Large single chamber is of latest design. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supplv at shipside. Served by 
Atlantic and East Carolina Railway Co., (a wholly- 
owned subsidiary of The Southern Railway System). 
One interstate truck line on property, and served by 
numerous highway motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on dutv at .ill times. 



VIA OCEAN TERMINALS 



SEED POTATOES FOR CAROLINA FARMERS 







An interesting annual tradition has again taken place at Ocean Terminals in More- 
head City with the arrival of approximately 65,000 bags of seed potatoes for North 
Carolina farmers. Dug by North Carolina's "good farm neighbors" of Prince Edward Is- 
land, Nova Scotia, Canada, the direct shipment enables Carolina farmers to receive 
quality seed potatoes with no losses. 

As in past years, the potatoes were checked and ap- 
proved for grade, quality and condition by E. C. Price, 
of the Federal-State Inspection Service with Inspector 
Walton of the U. S. Customs Bureau also on hand. At 
the left, above, Mr. Price begins his inspection duties. 

Also at the Terminals was J. B. Kittrell, Jr., Distribu- 
tor, Greenville, who met the S/S Georg Russ and 
watched the unloading, inspection and handling proc- 
ess. He appears at the right, above, looking over one 
of the first loads of potatoes. 

"Yes, we have some potatoes!" And as more and 
more agricultural commodities such as potatoes, grain 
and tobacco continue to pour through the ports, North 
Carolina consumers, farmers, distributors, brokers 
and retailers are finding that the State Ports mean 
good business for everyone. 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents - Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

P. O. BOX 249 

TELEPHONES 
PArk 6-4651 PArk 6-4652 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 

Peter B. Ruffin 

President 

W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 

Wade H. Pierce 

Assistant Secretary 



William T. Davies 

Manager 

W. D. Williams 

Secretary 

J. P. Wilson 

Treasurer 

Lemuel L. Doss, Jr. 

Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 376 



Hulls 



Cargoes 



P. O BOX 897 
RO 2-7721 




Yachts 



ESTABLISHED 
187B 



Protection & Indemnity 
All Other Marine & Overseas Coverages 



10 



Visit 



ors . . . 





Captain H. Jacobs, left, end Hans Edelmann, right, 
Labor Relations Representative of Hamburg-Amerika 
Line, pause after mittagessen (lunch) aboard the Erlangen 
at Ocean Terminals. Guests on board were Walt Fricde- 
richs, Operations Manager, Ocean Terminals, and Lewis 
Lawrence, Public Relations, SPA. The pause was justified 
as the luncheon menu read: Linscnsuppe, Schweinebraten, 
Rotkohl, Karto'feln, Schokoladen-Pudden, Vanilletunke, 
Kaffee. 



L. to R: A. Smith, Oper.-Mgr., State Docks; Captain John 
P. Koehn, Cosmopolitan Shipping Co., N. Y.; D. Leon 
Williams, Exec. Director, N. C. State Ports Authority; 
John E. Smith, Pres., Carribean Cruise Lines, are shown 
here as they stop in front of State Docks Administration 
Building. 




Mr. and Mrs. John L. McCwcn, (left above) Greenhcart, Inc., Miami, 
Fla., visit with Peter B. Ruffin, right, Wilmington Shipping Co. President. 
The lumber furnished by the company is highly resistant to marine 
borers, fire and abrasion. Greenhcart fender systems arc in use at both 
N. C. State Docks and Ocean Terminals. 

Mr. Jones, (in photo at right) of Jones Transportation Co., (left) and 
Jack Waters, Person-Garrett Tobacco Co., (right) pause at State Docks 
for a quick look at the ports operation. 




In background on left, Explorer Scouts Sam 
Jomes and Will Ramsey of Post 395, Raleigh. 
Center, left to right, Buzzy Banadayga. Troop 
396, O. Steel Trail, Advisor, and son Bill Trail 
of Troop 395 were some of the 35 scouts from 
Raleigh and Whiteville who visited the State 
Docks in February. Arrangements were made 
through the Public Relations Dcpt. of SPA. 




I 1 



STAFF MEETING -SPA 




The first yearly staff meeting of the N. C. State Ports Authority was held at State Docks in Wil- 
mington on Februrary 23. On hand for the business meeting were staff members of the various 
departments of the Ports Authority and included representatives from TV. C. Ocean Terminals, 
Morehead City, State Docks, Wilmington, the executive offices in Raleigh and New York. 



Those present for the State Ports business session 
were, seated above, from left to right. Ruff De Vane, 
Comptroller-Treasurer; D. Leon Williams, Executive 
Director; E. E. Lee, Jr., Director, Commerce and 
Traffic. Standing, left to right: Lewis H. Lawrence, 
Director, Public Relations Department; S. S. Koszew- 
ski, Representative, Commerce Department; Charles 
M. McNeil, Assistant Operations Manager, N. C. 
Ocean Terminals, Morehead City; H. C. Jackson, 
Traffic Manager; John C. Vandegriff, Eastern Repre- 
sentative, New York City; Al C. Smith, Operations 
Manager, N. C. Sta.e Docks, Wilmington; Frank M. 
Smith, Eastern Representative, New York City; H. N. 
Larcombe, Representative, Commerce Department. 



GREENHEART 

Piling. Timbers and Lumber in the Construction 

of Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and 

Bridges and Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVtNUE — NEW YORK, N. Y. 
TELEPHONE: MURRAY HILL 6-0410 

GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and 

to abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, 

dolphins, rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State 
docks at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 



Last minute shipping problems prevented Walter 
Friederichs, Operations Manager, N. C. Ocean Termi- 
nals, Morehead City, from being present at the staff 
meeting. However, he appears at the right, below, at 
Morehead City's Ocean terminals. 



•"• 




McNeil Smith Williams Vandegriff Friederichs 



12 



OIL- for N. C and foreign ports 








Not all the oils which come through the ports do so by ship 
or barge. This Menhaden Oil, above, arrived by truck in 
specially constructed U. S. Rubber Co. containers. It was then 
pumped, at 4,500 gallons in 15 minutes, into the storage 
tanks. Later, it was pumped into the hold of a ship bound for 
foreign ports. 



SHIP LAUNDRY 
AND DRY CLEANING 

One Day Service 

• 

IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 
CLEANERS, INC. 

FRONT 6, ORANGE STREETS — PHONE RO 2-6651 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



At the left above, a 377,000 gallon Esso oil barge discharges 
her cargo at berth 1, Ocean Terminols, Morehead City. Inset, 
left above. Captain L. E. Moore's Gator watches over her charge. 
Ottis Selby has charge of the barge. At the right, the Ship 
LIPARUS discharges Asphalt, another high tonnage maker for 
both the Wilmington and Morehead City ports. 



x: : : : :.;K;. ..;. ■:■,;:■:;: 



If you've 
got it ... a truck 

brought it ! 





YES, TO YOUR VERY DOOR 

FROM SHIPSIDE 

To your very door 

BY TRUCK 

The N. C. Trucking Ii*Jus'.ry ««^rves the fine North Caro- 
lina Ports. Trucks serve everyone — especially the more 
lhan 1800 Tar Heel communities entirely dependent on 
Trucks for everything to eat. wear, use and sell. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 



Trucking Industry Building 



Raleigh. N. C. 



1? 



N. C. STATE PORTS (OCEAN TERMINALS AND STATE DOCKS) 



Fastest Growing Deep Water Termina 




At left, above, general cargo is unloaded at State Docks, Wilmington, while ot right, above, tobacco is loaded for Far 
East Shipment at Ocean Terminals, Morehead City. This steadily increasing activity is making the two N C state 
ports the fastest growing in the South Atlantic. 



With a 1958 general cargo increase of 43 per cent 
at the N. C. State Ports Authority's deep water Ocean 
Terminals at Morehead City and State Docks, Wil- 
mington, the two ports are finding themselves the 
fastest growing in the South Atlantic. 

Much of this 1958 growth is due to the increased 
use of the two ports by North Carolina agriculture 
and industry. This growth has accelerated to the 
point where hundreds of different commodities were 
handled by State Docks, Wilmington, and by Ocean 
Terminals, Morehead City. 

76 more vessels were handled in 1958 than in 1957. 
In all, 420 vessels called at the ports. 216 vessels vis- 
ited State Docks and 204 called at Ocean Terminals. 
These ships handled 657,000 tons of cargo. 

Construction at Wilmington has been unable to 
keep pace with State Docks' 58 per cent general 
cargo increase of 1958. Two new open berths and a 
120,000 square foot warehouse are expected to be 
completed by December, 1959. 

A new 90,000 square foot warehouse has just been 
completed at Morehead City's Ocean Terminals and 
is already filled with tobacco. At Ocean Terminals, 
the general cargo increase was 28 per cent. 

The rapid growth of North Carolina's two ports is 
especially evidenced by an 82 per cent increase in 
tobacco exports through Ocean Terminals and a 30 
per cent increase through State Docks. Approximately 
100,000 hogsheads of tobacco were handled at both 
ports in 1958. 



This brisk trade has added $18 million of direct 
income to North Carolina in the last two years. This 
represents 50 per cent more than the $12 million spent 
or being spent on capital improvements. 

Seven new regularly scheduled steamship services 
have added State Docks and Ocean Terminals to their 
ports of call, two in the first three months of 1959. 

Commodity trade increases through the two deep 
water terminals are: Tobacco, textiles, lumber, chem- 
icals, pipe, scrap iron, cotton, jute for burlap, wool, 
hides, boilers, machinery, military cargo, brick, staves, 
plywood, woodpulp, paper grain, dry milk, asphalt 
and petroleum. 




Boilers for Brazil, from Babcock and Wilcox, illustrates another 
phase of ports activity which takes place at State Docks. 



14 



in South Atlantic 



With those commodity increase's moving across 
their docks and rapid physical expansion taking place, 
the state operated Ocean Terminals at Moreliead City 
and State Docks at Wilmington are the fastest grow- 
ing ports in the South Atlantic. 



t 


c. 










I 











Items from England — cars and nails — have increased steadily 
in the past year. 




Plywood shipments from Japan supply the North Carolina 
market. 



^ 





Trilisa 
Odoratissma 

Deei rongue— I rilisa odoi 

.iiiNsin.i to tin- more ■>< ientific 
minded — while not an export 
item <il tremendous volume 
through the North Carolina 
State Poi ts, rtevei th< less is "I 
importance to the economy <>l North Carolina. 

Deer tongue is bought locally by exporters ol crud< 
botanical drugs. I he leaves, delivered by local gatherers 
di\ ,iihI clean, are then processed and packed in com 
pressed bales averaging 150 pounds each. 

The perennial plant, which grows wild in the Morehead 
City-Wilmington area and from New Bern south, eventu- 
ally finds its way to Belgium, Germany and France, where 
most <>l ii is used in the flavoring ol tobacco. 

Late in summer the stalk grows about two feet in 
height, producing basal leaves which are large and leathery. 
Flowers ol .1 rose-purple color are produced in late autumn. 

When bruised, the plant K' vl '^ °A llu ' <H '" 1 "' ^"""■' X " 

essentia] oil, coumarin, a plant compound, is contained in 
the leaves. 

'•Trilisa" in itself constitutes only a portion ol the crude 
botanical drugs which leave North Carolina ports. Othei 
items ;ire American Wormseed, Aletris root, Gelsemium 
root, cotton root bark and beeswax. Together, these items, 
as well as others, contribute to the North Carolina economy. 



Steel pipe from Germany has directly aided 31 N. C. cities. 
The pipe was consigned to N. C. Natural Gas Corporation of 
Fayetteville. 



CAROLINA FORWARDING 
CORPORATION 

FMB 2309 

International 

Freight Forwarders 

and 

Customhouse Brokers 

• 

"Personalized Service" 



WILMINGTON MOREHEAD CITY 

Telephone RO 35161 Telephone PA 6-5080 



15 



ANOTHER NEW S S SERVICE 

WATERMAN SERVES STATE PORTS 





A new regularly scheduled steamship service, the 
second for North Carolina State Ports in 1959 (the 
seventh in the last 8 months ) , has been announced by 
Peter B. Ruffin, President of Wilmington Shipping 
Company. D. Leon Williams, Executive Director, 
N. C. State Ports Authority, said that "We are happy 
to welcome this fine steamship company as a member 
of our North Carolina shipping family." 

The Wilmington Shipping Company Agent said that 
service by Waterman Steamship Corporation would 
begin their regular monthly steamship service im- 
mediately, serving Far Eastern Ports and Wilmington, 
N. C. 

Waterman Steamship Corporation will load in Japan 
about the end of each month, operating on a Confer- 
ence basis and will accept cargo in various Far Eastern 
Ports for Wilmington discharge. Their normal rotation 
of loading ports is Pusan, Korea; Keelung, Formosa; 




DESIGNERS & 
BUILDERS 

FLOATING CRANES 

TUGS • BARGES 

DREDGES • FLOATING 

INDUSTRIAL PLANTS 

TRAVELING GANTRIES 
WHIRLY CRANES 



DIAMOND 

MANUFACT URINg^W .^'^COMPANY, INC. 




Ocean Steamship Terminals P. O. Box 647, Savannah, Ga. 



16 



Kobe, Nagoya, Shimizu and Yokohama, Japan. Vessels 
of the company proceed first to New York and call 
on the other Atlantic Coast Ports as cargo require- 
ments demand. Estimated transit time from Yokohama 
to New York is 29 days. 




Photo by Bob Seymour 

Mayor George Dill of Morehead City presents the key to the 
city to Copt. J. A. J. Reedijk of the Sommelsdyk. The Holland- 
America ship was the first to dock in Morehead City in 1959. 
Others in the picture are as follows: left to right, Walter 
Friederichs, port operations manager, Robert Hicks, shipping 
agent for Heide & Co., and Walter H. Zinglemann, lumber 
exporter. Standing, left to right, chief engineer Fredrik Westhof 
and chief officer G. Van Vliet. 



_J 



NEW YORK REPRESENTATIVE FOR SPA APPOINTED 



John C. Vandegriff has been appointed Eastern Representative for 

the North Carolina State Ports Authority. 

The announcement was made by 1). Leon Williams. Executive 
Director for North Carolina State Ports Authority, who said that the 
New York offices of the organization would move to its new location 
in the Woolworth Building, suite 3903, 233 Broadway. 

For the past eight years, Mr. Vandegrifi has been associated with 

the Georgia Ports Authority. A native oi Georgia, he has been asso- 
ciated with traffic and transportation throughout his career. In l'Jll 
he was transferred by the Georgia Railroad to New York as Eastern 

General Agent, where he was responsible 
for territory from New England, the East- 
erii States, District oi Columbia and East- 
ern Canada. 

Frank \I. Smith is an associate with Mr. 
Vandegriff, and a native of New York City 
with five years experience in transportation. 
Both Mr. Vandegriff and Mr. Smith live at 
Lake Valhalla, Montville, N. I. 



Frank M. Smith, left 
John Vandegriff, right 





John C. Vandegriff 



We invite . . . 




shippers 




manufacturers 



growers and 



to use our complete banking facilities in the 

port of Morehead City. 

In Morehead City . . . Beaufort 

Raleigh and other 

fine N. C. communities. 

SERVING NORTH CAROLINA SINCE 1898 



• merchants 




IRST- 

CITIZENS 

BANKS TRUST 
COME" 



MEMBER EEOERAL PEIMSIT INMHWih i HRI'OR VTIi>\ 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

Suite 220, Education Bldg. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



w 



° nh **a** iib 



s sion 



BULK RATE 
U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Permit No. 32 



FORM 3547 REQUESTED 




9t&ttA Cab&6uccc, 



STATE PORTS 



N. C. Ocean Terminals 



N. C. State Docks ~ \ 



" ^ Mo rehead City^X 



Wilmington^ 




For Economy • Efficiency • Speed • Personal Service • 



• Ship via the Mid-South Short Way 




He 




I 



nJL 



Carolina State Librari 
Raleigh 



4 Mm- 



N. C. Ocean Terminals 
Morehead City 



N. C. State Docks 
Wilmington 



JULY, 1959 



HEIDE AND CO INC 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 



>° y S^^w 




WILMINGTON, N. C. 

TELEPHONE ROger 3-8271 
And 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

TELEPHONE PArk 6-5080 or PArk 6-3652 



PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 

W. D. WILLIAMS 

Secretary 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Assistant Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Vice-President 

J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 

LEMUEL L. DOSS. JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 



LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 
Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Telephone RO 2-3381 WILSHLPCO 

Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Page 
Carolina Forwarding Corporation 15 

Carteret Towing Co. 4 

Diamond Manufacturing Co 14 

Durant, O. E., Ship Chandler ... 3 

First Citizens Bank & Trust Co. Inside Back Cover 

Greenheart (Demerara) Inc 12 

Heide & Company Inside Front Cover 

Ideal Laundry & Dry Cleaners, Inc. 13 

Maersk Line 7 

Morehead City Shipping Co 10 

N. C. Motor Carriers Association 13 

Security National Bank 5 

Southern Railway System 11 

United States Lines Company 2 

Walker Taylor Insurance 10 

The Bank of Wilmington 6 

Wilmington Shipping Co. Inside Front Cover 





Problems at North Carolina's 
two ports do not always in- 
volve storage, transporta- 
tion, time tables, and cargo. 
A lot of it involves digital 
skill and plain hard work. 
Some of these items of work 
are illustrated by G. Quell 
mal, (Stuttgart, Germany) 
shown here scraping paint 
from the side of the ship 
"Wruttemberg", while his 
friends perform the paint 
tasks in the bow's shadow. 
Hawser tying is no easy 
task, either. Here, a local 
stevedore performs a ship- 
side chore which has chang- 
ed little in centuries. 







NORTH CAROLINASTATE PORTS 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N C. s P \ 






July, 1959 



Vol. V, No. 3 



Correspondence concerning I UK NORTH CAROLINA STATI 
PORTS magazine should be addressed to: Lewis H. I awrence, Editor, 
North Carolina State Ports, P. O. Box 2485, Raleigh, N C Published 



Quarterly. 



Executive Offices 
Suite 220 Education Building 

P. O. Box 248S 

Tel. TEmplc 4-3611 Ext. 7335 

Raleigh, N. C. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

JOHN M. REEVES, Chairman 

WILLIAM G. CLARK, JR., 

Vice-Chairman 

COLLIER COBB, JR. 

KIRKWOOD F. ADAMS 

ROBERT L. EICHETBERGER 

CHARLES D. GRAY 

EARL N. PHILLIPS 

J. EDGAR KIRK, Secretary-Treasurer 



D. LEON WILLIAMS 

Executive Director 



E. E. LEE, JR., Director, 
Commerce &r Traffic 
H. C. JACKSON, Traffic Manager 
R. A. De VANE, Assistant Treasurer- 
Comptroller 
LEWIS H. LAWRENCE, 
Public Relations Director 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
H. N. LARCOMBE, Representative 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

Suite 3903, 233 Broadway 

New York 7. N. Y. 

REctor 2-8760 

JOHN C. VANDEGRIFF, Representative 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

N. C. Stair Docks 

P. (). Box 1619— Telephone 

ROger 3-1622 
TWX: WM 77 

AL C. SMITH 
operations Manager 



MOREHEAD CUT OFFICE 

N. C. Ocean Terminals 

P. O. Box 507— Telephone PArk 6-3159 
TWX: Morehead City, N. C. 8782 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



CON TENTS 

A State Port Serves Every Congressional District 2-3 

From Indian Burlap to American Bags _ __4-5 

Bowing In to N. C. Ports _ 6 

Trade Leads 7 

Port Facilities 8-9 

Visitors KM 1 

Construction Progress at State Ports —12 

S. E. Textile Mills Save $ $ -13 

Dram Tree Made Wilmington History —14 

The Military Sails Thru Morehead 15 

Grain to Far East— Busses to Arabia 16 

Ports Authority at Winston-Salem Inside Back Cover 



HAS YOUR ADDRESS CHANGED? DO YOU WISH TO 
CONTINUE RECEIVING THE "NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
PORTS" MAGAZINE? A POST CARD ADDRESSED TO: 
EDITOR, "N. C. STATE PORTS", P. O. BOX 2485, RA- 
LEIGH, N. C, WILL KEEP YOUR MAGAZINE ARRIVING 
ON TIME. PLEASE GIVE BOTH OLD AND NEW ADDRESS. 



1 



A STATE PORT SERVES EVER^ 




SOUTH ATLANTIC LINE 

Regular service between Norih Carolina Ports and Ireland, 
United Kingdom, and North Continental Europe 'will call at 
Baltic and Scandinavian ports when sufficient cargo offers. 




AMERICAN PIONEER LINE 

South Atlantic Ports direct to Honolulu, Yokohama, 
Manila, Keelung, Kobe and other Far East ports. 

• 

AGENTS 
Wilmington Shipping Co. — Phone RO 2-3381 

Wilmington. N. C. 

Morehead City Shipping Co.— Phone PA 6-4651 

Morehead City, N. C. 



UNITED STATES LINES CO. 

NEW YORK 4, N. Y. DIGBY 4-5800 



A check of the many commodities which move through the 
two State-owned deep water terminals — State Docks at Wil- 
mington and Ocean Terminals at Morehead City, shows that 
every N. C. Congressional District has profited by use of these 
facilities. 

Not only the N. C. Congressional Districts, but other dis- 
tricts far beyond the borders of this state have also profited. 

Increased use of the two ports by importers and exporters is 
in large measure responsible for a 1958 general cargo increase 
of 43 per cent at Ocean Terminals and State Docks, helping 
to make the two ports the fastest growing in the South Atlantic. 

Only a few of the imports (or exports) which move through 
the two state ports, and into the Congressional Districts are 
pictured above. Growth of the two ports has accelerated to the 
point where hundreds of different commodities are now handled 
by both deep water terminals. A very short list would include: 
Textiles, tobacco, natural and synthetic fibers, lumber, foreign 
automobiles, chemicals, petroleum products, pipe, nails, wire, 
scrap iron, cotton, burlap, wool, hides, boilers, machinery, 
military cargo, brick, staves, plywood, woodpulp, paper, grain, 
dry milk, and asphalt. 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 




These products, both import and export, hove aided every 
Congressional District in the state, as well as many business 
and agricultural firms outside N. C. boundaries. 

These two ports will maintain their pace as more and more 
agriculture and industry realize the economic advantages of- 
fered by these deep water terminols. With the products of the 
world at every doorstep and with more importers and exporters 
using the State's two ports — the desirable economic effects for 
the North Carolina area is rapidly becoming apparent. 



PROVISIONS, 
DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 

Representative ol 

Columbia Rope Wilmington, N. C. 

International Paint Telephone RO 2 4232 

Socony- Vacuum Oil Co., Inc. Water & Market Sti. 



FROM INDIAN BURLAP TO AMERICAN BAG 



re 



n 




The Ship "Steel Navigator" is shown unloading a portion of the 20 million yards 
of burlap supplied annually to the WERTHEIMER BAG COMPANY of Wilming- 
ton. This company's imports alone account for thousands of tons of burlap 
moving through the state ports. 



Take a bag of potatoes, for exam- 
ple. Or a bag of peanuts. A bag of 
fertilizer will also do, as would a bag 
of cottonseed meal, or a bag of feed. 

Such are the basic examples of the 
use to which burlap bags are put by 
North Carolina users. Burlap has also 
joined the "contempories," You will 
see it used as chair covering and as 
drapes and curtains in many a Caro- 
lina home or office these days. As 
"textured covering" for certain types 
of wall paper, it lends a desired effect 
not obtainable by other materials. 

Burlap, like the automobile, is al- 
most a modern day necessity, especial- 
ly for North Carolina and those states 
immediately bordering it. Attesting 
to this fact is the WERTHEIMER 
BAG COMPANY and the North 
Carolina State Ports Authority. The 
Wertheimer Bag Company of Wil- 
mington imports approximately 20 
million yards of burlap annually. This 
single import source accounts for 
thousands of tons of commerce for the 



UTD 



^ WITH 
CARTERET . . . 




. . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 



Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. 
CAPTAIN CHARLIE PINNER, 



PA 6-5440 



"At Right" burlap 
rests for only a sec- 
ond on a state port's 
dock. The bales are 
immediately moved 
into a transit shed 
where a checker 
makes a final tally 





State Docks. 

North Caro- 
lina, Virginia, 
Georgia and 
Florida are the 
fortunate receiv- 



ers of burlap 
bags made and 
shipped from 
Wilmington. At 
the Wertheimer 
Bag Company, 
five automatic 
print and fold machines (eacii cutting and print- 
ing 60 bags per minute) help send the bags on 
their way to processors, farmers and manufac- 
turers. 

To those wise in the ways of North Carolina, 
a "tow" or "gunny sack" holds no glamor of far-off 



- - PLUS 1001 OTHER USES 



India, but is a most practical item. Many a highly- 
trained bird dog has had a good "burlap" rub- 
down after a hard, wet hunt, and afterwards slept 
on burlap bedding. Many a chicken owes her egg 
productivity to the burlap bag, which keeps exces- 
sive sun out of the chicken house in summer and 
stops cold drafts in winter. Those Carolinians who 
haven't gone completely cosmopolitan may also 
remember the joys of using a burlap bag door mat. 

Least we forget, and lake our burlap blessing 
for granted, it should be remembered that the raw 
product for this bagging is grown in India. It 
travels approximately 8,510 miles (by way ol the 
Suez canal, Port Said, Gibralter and the Atlantic 
Ocean before it reaches a state-owned deep-watei 
terminal) at Wilmington or Morehead City. 

Burlap is indirectly manufactured from cor- 
chorus olitorius and capsularis. From these plants 
jute is produced, this is the glossy fiber of these 
two East Indian Plants which becomes burlap. 




Jute plants being immersed in water (Retting Process), India. 

Botanists say the plants are members of the linden 
family. The jute is woven into burlap and shipped 
in bales to the N. C. ports. 

Look out in any large peanut field this fall. 
You'll see the dust rising from the bagging process. 
Watch the loads of tobacco going to market in 




Baling of Jute in "Kutcha" Bale Press, India 

September and notice the burlap protecting the 
leaves. Remember that a burlap bag has no equal 
when cotton-picking time comes along. 

Remember too, that the state's two deep water 
terminals were helpful in bringing the burlap to 
North Carolina and the Southeast. 




Indian Jute plants being harvested. All photos on this page 
courtesy Indian Jute Mills Association, New York. 



Setting the Pace 
in the Port City 

The Most Progressive Bank 

in the 

South's Most Progressive State 



SECURITY 

NATIONAL BANK 



WILMINGTON 

GREENSBORO, HIGH POINT, BURLINGTON, 
RALEIGH, TARBORO 

"North Co'ohna's Largest Notionol Bonk " 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 
MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP 



BOWING IN TO STATE PORTS 



Some ships bow in more sensationally than others. 

Helping to contribute to this sensationalism as they dock at 
North Carolina's Ocean Terminals and State Docks, Wilming- 
ton, are the Norwegian sculptors whose bronze figureheads 
adorn the bows of many ships. 



From the opera "La Boheim" comes the 
idea of this gypsy dancer, "right" her tam- 
borines ready. The Norwegian ship of the 
A. 0. Andersen Shipping Company, Oslo, 
called at a North Carolina state port recent- 
ly. Though not as dramatic as the opera, 
the 1,900 tons of fish oil loaded aboard the 
S/S "La Boheim" for Germany will make 
an interesting impression on the North 
Carolina economy. 





Sigurd Norm sculpt- 
ed this figure of an 
Indian chief smoking 
\ $\*$'' a P eoce P'P e - O" the bow 
' * of the BONANZA'S bow, 
this symbol of peace travels 
from continent to continent. 




THE BANK OF 
WILMINGTON 



MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT 

INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 






Background material contributed by "The Lookout," Seaman's 
Church Institute of New York. 




(Left Above) Fred Olsen & Co. usually selects a figurehead 
associated with its ship's name or route. When this is not pos- 
sible, the role goes to the buxom maidens of yore. The shy 
lady shown at the left is guarded by two cherubs as she faces 
life on the prow of the BURRARD. (Right) The MS BAALBEK 
is led by a long-haired maiden, who, like her ship, is on her 
way to (a North Carolina) market. 




LEADS 



TRADE LISTS 

A SERVICE AID TO THE FOREIGN TRADER 

Trade lists, identifying by name and address foreign firms 
and individuals engaged in international trade, classified by 
country and commodity, are a special facility provided by 
the Bureau of Foreign Commerce to aid American business- 
men in developing and expanding their foreign markets. 
These lists are prepared abroad on behalf of the Bureau by 
the United States Foreign Service and are available from 
the Greensboro Field Office of the U. S. Department of 
Commerce at $2. a list. 

Trade lists provide not only the names and addresses of 
the more important and active foreign distributors, manu- 
facturers and suppliers for a given commodity and country, 
but also designate the relative size of each firm, type of 
operation, products handled, and sales territory. Each list 
contains a preface which outlines the market potentialities 
for the United States products covered by the trade list 
classification and provides a summary of the general con- 
ditions governing trade in the specified products. In addi- 
tion to business concerns, listings are also available for cer- 
tain professional groups, institutions, and service organiza- 
tions; lor example, Architects and Hospitals. 

Trade lists are available in more than 65 general com- 
modity and industry classifications covering 118 countries 
and principal trading areas. Lists for specific commodities 
afe prepared lor 68 of these countries. However, in 10 
areas where foreign trade is limited and where imported 
products are sold through general trading firms, it has been 
found practical to prepare a single consolidated list ol 
business firms. Lists of State Trading Companies are main- 
tained lor seven countries within the Soviet Bloc. 

The Greensboro Field Office suggests that firms consider 
its potential usefulness to them. For example, exporters 
and importers of foodstuffs may establish trade connections 
with buyers or suppliers through use of lists in the follow- 
ing classifications: Canneries; Coffee, lea and Cocoa; Con- 
fectionery; Fruits and Nuts; Meat Packing, Sausage and 
Casings; Oils (Animal, Fish and Vegetable); and Provi- 
sions. A textile manufacturer might find helplul the lists 
on Dry Goods and Clothing— Importers and Dealers. Cloth 
ing Manufacturers, or the Textile Industry. Many firms use 
the lists to check sales of their representatives abroad to 
the firms named. The address of the Greensboro Field Office 
is Room 108, Post Office Building, Box 1950, Greensboro, 
North Carolina. 

IMPORT OPPORTUNITIES 

EARTHENWARE 

Denmark — Morkov Keramikfabrik (manufacturer, export 
er of ceramic and earthenware), Ringstedgade, Morkov, 
wishes to export direct or through agent 1.000 items daily, 
top quality earthenware items including vases, bowls, ash 
trays, lamp bases, wright iron holders for fire-prool dishes. 



MACHINERY 

Netherlands— N. V. Snelwegerfabriek Olland (manufai 
turer), 196-200 Utrechtseweg, De Bill, wishes to export 
direct motor-driven sliccis. and electric meat chopper* 
Illustrated and descriptive literature available.* 

MINERALS 
JEcuador— Gil Carrera Chavez (manufacture] ol fertilizers, 

wholesaler of foodstuffs), P. O. Box 3063, Quito, wishes to 
export direct or through agent approximately 100,000 lbs. 
monthly unrefined ore; analysis indicates ore contains c al- 
ternates, silicates, iron, aluminum, manganese, nickel, 
molybdenum (traces), cobalt, calcium magnesium, and 
arsenic (traces). The percentages ol content ol each min< ral 
are stated on the analysis, copy ol which is available. - 

SCALES 

Netherlands— N. V. Snelwegerfabriek Olland (manufac- 
turer), 196-200 Utrechtseweg, De Bill, wishes to export 
direct counter scales and special scales for pharmacists and 
laboratories. Illustrated and descriptive literature.* 

SPRAYING EQUIPMENT 

Netherlands— N. V. Halocel (manufacturer), 3 Kruger- 
straat, Utrecht, wishes to export direct unlimited quantity 

Joel B. New, Business Analyst 
U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. O. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Moreheac City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, Formosa, 

Japan, Korea, Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE & CO., INC. 

109 South Sixth Street 

Morehead City, N. C. 

Telephone PArk 6-5080 01 PArk 6-3652 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agenti 
30 Brood Street, New York 4, N. Y. 




Shown here is the architect's conception of the two new soon-to-be constructed berths of steel and 
concrete, transit shed (120,000 square feet) and a large paved open berth, at State Docks, Wilm- 
ington. 



WILMINGTON 



N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Al Smith, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing three 500-foot vessels simultaneously, 
with depth of 34 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 square 
feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and mason- 
ry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage of warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

OPEN STORAGE: Three acres of paved open storage, 
easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. Certified weighmasters on 
twenty-four hour duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron; also depressed tracks at 
rear of transit sheds and warehouse, entire length. 
Storage yard on property for 240 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes 
for heavy lifts, single or in tandem, and equipped 
for 80-inch magnet work and 2-yard bucket opera- 
tion. 



One 35-ton locomotive crane and one 25-ton loco- 
motive crane. 
Three Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of 
various sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton 
mobile crane. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at the transit sheds 
and warehouse; ramps for easy access into sheds 
and warehouses; portable side and end loading 
ramps for rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumiga- 
tion plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. Export 
crating service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Sea- 
board Air Line Railroad Companies and numerous 
highway motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



8 



CILITI 



Here is construction at Morehead City, showing 90,000 square foot warehouse, water tank, addi- 
tional railroad facilities. 



MOREHEAD CITY 



N. C. OCEAN TERMINALS 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petro- 
leum tanker, with a depth of 30 feet at mean low 
water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60,000 square 
feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinklers. 

One transit shed, 32,000 square feet, constructed 
of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 
A third transit shed, the newest, is of pre-fabricated 
steel construction with sprinklers and has capacity 
of 40,000 square feet. 

WAREHOUSES: Three storage warehouses, totaling 
178,000 square feet, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: A large open storage area is avail- 
able. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. At- 
lantic and East Carolina Railway freight car storage 
yard adjacent to Port property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 
Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Excellent facilities for loading 
grain in ships or barges. 250 tons hour capacity. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easy access into transit sheds and 
warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Up-to-date fumigation plant of most 
modern concrete and steel construction is now in 
operation. Large single chamber is of latest design. 

SERVICES: Telephone, electricity and Federally ap- 
proved potable water supply at shipside. Served by 
Atlantic and East Carolina Railway Co.. (a wholly- 
owned subsidiary of The Southern Railway System 

One interstate truck line on property, and served by 

numerous highway motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



i 



I 










SIIORS 






A special tour by County Agents to the Ocean Terminal grain facility at Moreheod City was 

enjoyed by the 6TH COUNTY AGENT ASSOCIATION OF THE EASTERN DISTRICT. Explaining 

the operation was Ben (Leon) Clifton, operator for Carolina Grain. The County Agents, 

propelled by their District Agricultural Agent John Piland, learned about deep-water gram 

shipments and the benefits to North Carolina farmers and others in the Southeast 

area. 

Appearing from left to right are: Shepherd Moore, Assistant Agricultural Agent, 
Pamlico County; Edward S. Lassiter, Jr., Assistant Agricultural Agent, Craven County; 
Dan Vernelson, Assistant Agricultural Agent, Jones County; Nolan Mitchell, 
Director of Sales Aerovent Fan Company, Lansing, Michigan; M. P. Chesnutt, 
County Agricultural Agent, Beaufort County; Clyde Perdue, Jones Equipment 
Company, Louisburg; Harry Venters, Assistant Agricultural Agent, Carteret 
County; R. P. Bryan, Assistant Agricultural Agent, Onslow County; Dr. H. E. 
Scott, Entomology Specialist, State College; A farmer from Beaufort County; 
R. M. Williams (in shirt sleeves) County Agent, Carteret County; E. S. Coates, 
Agricultural Engineering Specialist, State College; Howard Ellis, In Charge of 
Agricultural Engineering, State College; John E. Piland, District Agricultural 
Agent, State College; A. T. Jackson, County Agent, Craven County; E. W. Barnes, 
Assistant Agricultural Agent, Beaufort County; Charles Hawley, Assistant Agricultural 
Agent, Onslow County; D. A. Halsey, County Agricultural Agent, Onslow County; Earl 
Mcllwean, Assistant Agricultural Agent, Onslow County; N. W. Worsley, Assistant Agricul- 
tural Agent, Beaufort County; Next person unidentified; Ben Clifton, Manager of Grain 
Terminal, Morehead City; J. P. Stovall, County Agent, Pamlico County. 







'black con, 




MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents - Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

P. O. BOX 249 
TELEPHONES 




PArk 6-4651 

CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHTPCO 

Peter B. Ruffin 

President 

W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 

Wade H. Pierce 

Assistant Secretary 



PArk 6-4652 
William T. Davies 

Manager 

W. D. Williams 

Secretary 

J. P. Wilson 

Treasurer 

Lemuel L. Doss, Jr. 

Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 376 



"Yes, THESE are excellent deep-water terminals, says Lester 
Horahoe right, to H. D. Cook, left, as they visited Morehead 
City's Ocean Terminals in April. Mr. Horahoe is Terminal 
Superintendent for Black Diamond Steam Ship Company while 
Mr. Cook is Hampton Rhodes Manager for Norton, Lilly & 
Company, steamship agents & operators. 



Hulls 



Cargoes 



Yachts 



P. O. BOX 897 
RO 2-7721 




ESTABLISHED 
1878 



Protection &• Indemnity 
All Other Marine & Overseas Coverages 



10 



^O* -0€ 





"In the picture at left from 
left to right" Mr. John T. 
Barnes, Jr., McLean Truck- 
ing Lines; Mrs. J. T. Barnes; 
Captain A. Raschke, M/V 
Tuebingen, Hamburg-Ameri- 
can Line; Mr. D. J. MacMil- 
lan, and Mrs. D. J. McMillan, 
P. Lor. Hard Co., Inc. from 
Clifton, New Jersey. Theirs 
was a May 5th inspection 
trip to Ocean Terminals .and 

, a tour of the Hamburg- 

\ American Line ship. 




~&i 



"Ltf* "0€^ 



Kecent Raleigh visitors were, at left obove: Samuel R. Morris, 
Regional Supervisor, U. S. Dcpt. of Agriculture, Agricultural 
Research Service, Plant Quarantine Division for Gulf Region, 
New Orleans. With him is J. H. Mahaney, Inspector-ln-Charge, 
U. S. D. A. Plant Quarantine Division with headquarters in 
Wilmington. 




(Left above) Not only did they come and use their TV camera 
for WITN, Washington, N. C, they also learned some of the 
technical aspects of the world of shipping. The visit Ocean 
Terminals of Hal Wilson, left. Fabulous Fisherman and Opera- 
tions Manager, WITN, TV, and Billy Noye, right, cameraman 
resulted in some exciting TV film for the Woshington, N. C. 
audience. 

(Right above) Observing steel products being discharged from 
the RICHETTO PARODI for distribution in N. C. are, left to 
right: Lester Hinnant, Director Purchasing, Farmers Co-Op ., 
Raleigh; Tom Dunning, Products Manager, United Co-Opera- 
tives, Alliance, Ohio; Frans Reyntjens, Director, Bekaert Steel 
Wire Corp., Belgium. The visitors called at State Docks, 
Wilmington. 




"Above" Captain A. H. Jensen of M/V 
Olga Maersk, right, with Mr. and Mrs. 
James Rowland and son & daughter, en- 
joy the good weather and good business 
aboard ship at Morehead's Ocean Termi- 
nals. Mr. Rowland, with the James I. 
Miller Tobacco Company, inspected the 
tobacco loading operation. Cargo was 
destined for the Far East. 

(Left) Col. H. I. Dunlap, 2nd Marine Di- 
vision Embarkation Officer, Camp Le- 
jeune, preparing to board the U. S. 
Gyott, guided missile destroyer. The de- 
stroyer docked at Morehead's Oceon Ter- 
minals in March. Colonel Dunlap is a 
frequent visitor (in an official capacity), 
usually concerned with movement of mili- 
tary cargo and personnel. 




Every Southern Railway sales and service 
representative is a specialist in shipping 
matters. Why not let him help you with 
your overseas shipments to and from the 
South? He will be pleased to serve you! 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 




N 




CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS 
AT STATE PORTS 




Capital Improvements allocated the N. C. State Ports 
Authority for 1959-61 has been set at $917,000. 

The money will be shared by the southeast's two fastest 
growing ports. Wilmington's State Docks will receive $560,- 
000. Morehead City's Ocean Terminals get $357,000. 

For Wilmington, monies are earmarked for extension of 
warehouse space and purchase of fork lifts. It is estimated 
that an additional 80,000 square feet for dry storage will 
be provided. 

At Morehead City, 60,000 square feet of additional ware- 
housing is to be constructed. Other expenditures include 
purchase of fork lifts, garage erection, transit shed and dock 
fender repair. 

Recent construction progress is illustrated by the new 
berth at Wilmington's State Docks (left above) and by the 
completion of the fifth grain storage tank at Morehead City s 
Ocean Terminals. (The grain elevators were erected by 
Carolina Grain Corporation) Not shown is the newly com- 
pleted 90,000 square foot warehouse at Ocean Terminals. 
The work taking place in the picture below is a familiar one 
at both ports, and will be more in evidence as new construc- 
tion begins. 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction 

of Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and 

Bridges and Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE — NEW YORK, N. Y. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE — WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. 

GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and 

to abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, 

dolphins, rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State 
docks at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 




12 



Southeast Textile Mills Save $$$ 



STARCH VIA N. C DEEP WATER TERMINALS 




Any reasonable textile man who's worth his (starch) will tell you that in the picture at left, above, the yarns are being run 
through their starch bath prior to being woven into cloth. Starch imparts the necessary strength needed to produce a good weave. 

Above right, the yarns are inspected after having been washed and dried. As the textile industry knows, starch is one of the basic 
commodities of the business, and its cost may have a great deal to do with the profit margin. In the Southeast, textile mills are 

improving their profit position by savings realized when they import their product through a state port Ocean Terminals at 

Morehead City or State Docks, Wilmington. These savings are passed on to the consumer, both at home and abroad. When the 
finished cloth is shipped to world markets, both manufacturer and consumer again profit by use of the facilities offered by North 
Carolina's two deep water terminals. (Lamont Photos courtesy Textile Research Center, N. C. State College, Raleigh) Below, the 
starch moves from ship-side by fork-lift truck into the transit shed at one of the ports. THE MORNINGSTAR-N ICHOL COMPANY 
IS N. C.'S LARGEST STARCH IMPORTER. 




\y.<-: >:•>:'■'■:■: '■'■:■:--■:■. :^y-- :*.; 



v., i \^ 



If you've 
got it... a truck 

brought it ! 




& 



SHIP LAUNDRY 

AND DRY CLEANING 

One Day Service 

• 

IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 
CLEANERS, INC. 

FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE RO 2-6651 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

"Serving Ships Since 1919" 




YES, TO YOUR VERY DOOR 

FROM SHIPSIDE 

To your very door 

BY TRUCK 

The N. C. Trucking Iiviustry -serves the fine North Caro- 
lina Ports. Trucks serve everyone — especially the more 
than 1800 Tar Heel communities entirely dependent on 
Trucks for everything to eat, wear, use and sell. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Trucking Industry Building Raleigh. N. C. 



13 



Dram Tree Made Wilmington History 




Photo reproduction courtesy N. C. Hall of History 



(State Docks Now 

Make More History 
With Increased Commerce) 



Time, and the urgent demands of North 
Carolina's sea-going commerce, has destroyed 
one 01 the state's most familiar marine land- 
marks. 

A sentinel for seafarers since the Sixteenth 
Century, Wilmington's "Dram Tree" met her 
death at the hands of a bulldozer during World 
War II, to make room for the North Carolina 
Shipbuilding Company. (Now the area of 
N. C. State Docks) 

The Dram Tree was a naked cypress, only 
partially dressed by moss. During her three 
centuries of life, she welcomed the incoming 
sailor into Wilmington's Harbor and warned 
the out-bound sailor that his voyage had begun. 

According to Mr. Henry Hayden's historical 
manuscript, "Acorns, Atoms and Azaleas", it 
was the custom of sailors from every land to 
"Quaff a dram of spirits for good luck's sake 
as their ships passed this tree on entering and 
leaving the port of Wilmington." 

Many Wilmingtonians were saddened when 
they learned that this historic landmark was 
sacrificed in the interest of National Defense. 
As mementos, many wooden gavels were made 
out of the remains of the Dram Tree and the 
owners prize them highly, as there are reputed- 
ly many legends connected with this three cen- 
tury water-front sentinel. 

According to Mr. Hayden, the late Mr. Wai- 
ter Storm, a former President of the Wilming- 
ton Iron Works, wrote about the ancient tree: 



,/ DESIGNERS & 

/jf BUILDERS 

FLOATING CRANES 

TUGS • BARGES 

DREDGES • FLOATING 

INDUSTRIAL PLANTS 




TRAVELING GANTRIES 
WHIRLY CRANES 



Ocean Steamship Terminals P. O. Box 647, Savannah, Ga. 



Down where the Cape Fear rolls 

to the sea a lonely cypress 

stands 
A tree that's known to coastwise 

ships and to those of foreign 

lands; 
And Oh! what tales this tree could 

tell to 'Tars' of Uncle Sam 
About the days of Tom and Jerry 

when sailors took their dram. 



A welcome tree to every 'Salt' 
when throats were parched and 
dry; 

Back in the days when clipper 
ships were among the passers- 
by 

And decks were lined with crews 
inclined to take a friendly nip 

According to traditions in the 
spirit of fellowship. 



Those days are gone but the tree 

still stands — 
A landmark of the shore 
A legendary outpost 
That will remain forevermore 
In the logbook of OLD Neptune 

in his records of the sea 
In the archives of tradition 
In the vaults of memory. 



14 



The Military Sails Thru Morehead 




The Excellence of Ocean Terminal's facilities and close proximity to military installations has given an economy-minded Govern- 
ment good reason to move cargo and personnel via this N. C. port. 

At the left, above, some of this cargo is unloaded. On the right, Major General J. C. Burger, Commanding General, 2d Marine 
Division, Congratulates Lt. Colonel W. E. Antley, Jr., Commanding Officer, 2d Battalion, 6th Marines. The Colonel's battalion re- 
turned from a six month cruise in the Mediterranean as the amphibious striking arm of the U. S. 6th Fleet. While in the area, 
the 6th Marines participated in the landing at Veirut, Lebanon. Below, in the "Uniform of the Day," "A." "J." Diller, son of 
Captain J. K. Diller and Mrs. Sallie Diller of Jacksonville, N. C, greets his Daddy upon the Captain's arrival at Morehead City's 
Ocean Terminals. Captain Diller is the S-l officer of the 2d Battalion, 6th Marines. (All photos by U. S. M. C.) 





All trans-atlantic passenger service from N. C. ports aboard 
Ozean-Stinnes vessels is reported to have been booked through 
September, 1959. Ozean-Stinnes Passenger Service out of 
Ocean Terminals, Morehead City, N. C, is available through 
Heide and Company on freighters. Maximum is 1 2 passengers. 
Ships leave from Morehead directly to Antwerp, Rotterdam, 
Hamburg and Bremen. Approximately $400 round trip. Vessels 
of Ozean Stinnes Lint; return to State Docks, Wilmington, every 
two weeks from the Continent. 



CAROLINA FORWARDING 
CORPORATION 

FMB 2309 

International 

Freight Forwarders 

and 

Customhouse Brokers 

• 

"Personalized Service" 



WILMINGTON 

Telephone RO 3 5161 



MOREHEAD CITY 

Telephone PA 6-5080 



15 



GRAIN 



r 



FROM K 

" ^ Mo rehead City^t?^ 







BUSSES 



FROM 



m. 



"! 






Wilmington^ 





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V 




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fig* *'«' 


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-j s.-HyL. .'■ ■p* , p 



The M V Leda Maersk was well satisfied with her recent grain shipment 
taken on at Ocean Terminals in Morehead City. Loading approximately 239 
tons per hour, she sailed from the port in four hours. Simultaneously, tobacco 
was also stowed forward. The Carolina Grain Company now has five tanks on 
the Ocean Terminal property. The last tank, now being completed, will give a 
total tank storage of 110,000 bushels, plus 75,000 bushels of warehouse 
storage. Heide & Co. were stevedores for the shipment, while Carolina Forward- 
ing Co. were agents. Discussing this Far East shipment on aboard are in the 
left hand picture above: W. S. Davis, District Superintendent, Grain Inspection, 
Baltimore, Md. and Leon Clifton, Operations, Carolina Grain Company. In the 
picture at right above, Fred Webb of Fred Webb, Inc., Greenville, N. C, dis- 
cusses the shipment with Norman Harris, Finance, Carolina Grain Company. 

The wheels of these American-made Busses (below) will soon grind through 
the Saudi Arabian sands. They were shipped through State Docks, Wilmington, 
aboard the S/S North Marchioness. 



Wz 



**f**r>^ 




16 




AT MOREHEAD CITY MEETING, JULY 13 



v 

* 




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k <«*^. 








IS. 



/ 



A change in the regular routine of business took place when the State Ports Authority met in Morehead City on July 13. 
Authority members were guests aboard the U. S. Coast Guard Training Ship "UNIMAK", along with members of North Carolina's 
Board of Conservation and Development. 

Special guests aboard the UNIMAK was the State's First Lady, Mrs. Luther Hodges, at the buffet table above. Further down 
the line from the Governor's wife are: Rear Admiral V. P. Colmar, Commander, 5th Coast Guard District, the host; Ed Rankin, 
Private Secretary to Governor Hodges; Mrs. D. Leon Williams, wife of the N. C. State Ports Authority's Executive Director, D. Leon 
Williams, who appears immediately in the line behind her. Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Kennett, Conservation and Development Board, 
Durham, follow the Executive Director. 



We invite . . . 




shippers 




manufacturers 



growers and 



to use our complete banking facilities in the 

port of Morehead City. 



merchants 




In Morehead City . . . Beaufort 
Raleigh and other 
fine N. C. communities. 
SERVING NORTH CAROLINA SINCE 1898 



JlRST- 
CITIZENS 

BANKS TRUST 
COMB"' 



MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

Suite 220, Education Bldg. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Permit No. 32 



For Economy • Efficiency • Speed • Personal Service • 



• Ship via the Mid-South Short Way • • 





9toVt/t Cahjotiiuo 



STATE PORTS 



WILMINGTON 



N. C. Ocean Terminals 

MOREHEAD CITY 



f 1 , 



L He 



c 

'oc 



t 



rx 



North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 



ST 



im. 



X^'tZS? 



PORTS 





PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 

W. D. WILLIAMS 

Secretary 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Assistant Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Vice-President 

J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 

LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 



LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 
Offices At 

North Carolina State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Telephone RO 2-3381 WILSHIPCO 

Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Page 

Carolina Forwarding Corporation 15 

Carteret Towing Co. 4 

Durant, O. E., Ship Chandler 3 

First Citizens Bank & Trust Co. Inside Back Cover 

Greenheart (Demerara) Inc. 12 

Heide & Company Inside Front Cover 

Ideal Laundry & Dry Cleaners, Inc. 13 

Maersk Line 2 

Morehead City Shipping Co. 10 

N. C. Motor Carriers Association 13 

Security National Bank 5 

Southern Railway System 11 

Walker Taylor Insurance 10 

The Bank of Wilmington 6 

Wilmington Shipping Co. Inside Front Cover 



HEIDE AND CO., INC. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 



w° y S^ e *e,. 




WILMINGTON, N. C. 

TELEPHONE ROger 3-8271 
And 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

TELEPHONE PArk 6-5080 or PArk 6-3652 



ftr 



*-«w&j»r 



>.%, 



' i, *=«*tflgj^ L *.' 



*uftB2 



The ship Steel Architect of the State Marine Service, 
Isthmian Lines, made its first call at Ocean Terminals, More- 
head City, on August 10. It represented the first call by this 
company at the North Carolina port, D. Leon Williams, N. C. 
Ports Authority Director, reported. 

The vessel took on approximately 500 hogsheads of tobacco 
for Manila. 

J. E. Murray, Norfolk man- y 

ager for the State Marine Isth- 
mian Agency, indicated his 
agency was hopeful of schedul- 
ing vessels for the Mediterran- 
ean-Indian service in the future. 

In addition to Manila, the 
Steel Architect travels to Saigon, 
Bangkok, Surabaya, Singapore, 
Belawan, Panang and other 
ports on the Isthmian Line 
round-the-world service. 

Above, the Steel Architect is 
nosed into Ocean Terminals. 

At right. Captain J. Kau- 
serud smiles after completion 
of the smooth docking and 
final loading operation. The 
Captain is an old aquaintance 
of Walt Friederichs, Operations 
Manager at Ocean Terminals. 





NORTH CAROLINASTATE PORTS 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 



Novimbkr, 19. : j9 



Vol. V, No. i 



Correspondence concerning THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
PORTS magazine should be addressed to: Lewis II. Lawrence, Editor, 
North Carolina State Ports, P. O. Box 2485, Raleigh, N. C. Published 

Quarterly. 



Executive Offices 
Suite 220 Education Building 

P. O. Box 2485 

Tel. TEmple 4-3611 Ext. 7335 

Raleigh, N. C. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

JOHN M. REEVES, Chairman 

WILLIAM G. CLARK, JR., V ice-Chairman 

COLLIER COBB, JR. 

KIRKWOOD F. ADAMS 

ROBERT L. EICHELBERGER 

CHARLES D. GRAY 

EARL N. PHILLIPS 

THOMAS M. EVINS 

HARVEY C. HINES 

J. EDGAR KIRK, Secretary-Treasurer 



D. LEON WILLIAMS 

Executive Director 



E. E. LEE, JR., Director, 
Commerce & Traffic 
H. C. JACKSON, Traffic Manager 
R. A. De VANE, Assistant Treasurer- 
Comptroller 
LEWIS H. LAWRENCE, 
Public Relations Director 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
H. N. LARCOMBE, Representative 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

Suite 3903, 233 Broadway 

New York 7, N. Y. 

REctor 2-3700 

JOHN C. VANDEGRIFF, Representative 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

N. C. Stale Docks 

P. O. Box 1619— Telephone 

ROger 3-1022 

I WX: WM 77 

AL C. SMITH 

Opera I ions Ma nager 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

N. C. Ocean Terminals 
P. O. Box 507— Telephone PArk £3159 
TWX: Morehead City, N. C. 8782 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS 
Operations Manager 



CONTENTS 

Pag< 

Index to Advertisers Inside Front Cover 

1st Call by Isthmian to Ocean Terminals Inside Front Cover 

Imports Increase 32 Per Cent 2 & 3 

Munnawhatteaug Comes of Age .. 4 &: 5 

FCX Serves Farmers . . . With Port's Help (i 

Trade Leads . . . Agency Index Promotes Exports .. . 7 

Port Facilities 8 & 9 

Visitors 10 & 11 

Babcock and Wilcox Helps South America Shine 12 & 13 

Million Dollar Tobacco Pnrchase 1-1 

Chemstrand Has Interest in N. C. 14 

American Export to Serve N. C. 15 

Shades of Cleopatra! 16 

New Ports Authority Members _ Inside Back Cover 



We are not rushing the season, but though! our readers 
would want to get their N. C. STATE PORTS magazine be- 
fore Christmas, which is always so lull ol business, families 
and bills. Getting it at this time, you may have a chance to 
glance quickly through these pages and realize that ours has 
been a good year— especially so because ol the interest and 
support shown by leaders of business, industr) and agricul- 
ture, as well as those from all walks ol life who realize that 
"THE TWO FASTEST GROWING PORTS IN THE 
SOUTH ATLANTIC" can make a real contribution to 
North Carolina and the Southeast Area. 

Our sincere good wishes lor the forthcoming Holiday 
Season. 

COVER 

STEEL PRODUCTS have been a great factor in causing a 
32 per cent increase in imports for the two N. C. State 
Ports. For more about the increase, see pages 2 and 3. 



1 





IMPORTS INC 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kony, Formosa, 

Japan, Korea, Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE & CO., INC. 

109 South Sixth Street 

Morehead City, N. C. 

Telephone PArk 6-5080 or PArk 6-3652 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 
30 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



FIRST SIX MC 



In a recent special report, D. Leon Williams, Executive 
Director for the N. C. State Ports Authority, said that pre- 
liminary figures compiled by the Commerce and Traffic 
Department indicates that import tonnage increased by ap- 
proximately 32 per cent for the first six months of 1959 
over the same period of 1958. 

The Ports Director attributed much of the increased ton- 
nage to the steady growth of North Carolina's industrial 
expansion. This expansion has gradually increased over the 
past several years to place N. C. in the forefront in indus- 
trial development in the Southeast. 



\ 





kEASE 32% 
^THS OF '59 




^ 



"While the Nation as a whole, in 1958, showed a decline 
of 17.4 per cent from 1957 in overall industrial capital 
gains, North Carolina showed an increase of 32.48 per cent 
in 1958 over 1957. (Exports increased 6%.) The two State 
Ports have rapidly expanded to keep pace with this indus- 
trial growth. This, and an increased awareness of the two 
ocean ports by agricultural importers have kept the two 
ports growing faster than ever," the Director noted. 

Scenes of some of the import activities are shown here, 
while below, Nick Gore, Traffic Department, inspects the 
excellent quality of wire fencing soon to adorn a North 
Carolina farm. 





PROVISIONS, 
DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 

Representative of 

Columbia Rope Wilmington. N. C. 

International Paint Telephone RO 2-4232 

Socony-Vacuum Oil Co., Inc. Water & Market St». 



MUNNAWHATTEAUG 




Close-up of the fabulous Menhaden — formerly Nunnawhatteaug — with his mouth open as he injests and breaks down ocean life for 
his own chemical-rich body. He provides thousands of dollars in pay checks yearly for inhabitants of the N. C. Coast. 



^ WITH 
CARTERET . . . 





. . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 



Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. 
CAPTAIN CHARLIE PINNER, 



PA 6-5440 



"Keep your mouth closed and learn more." 

This is an old bit of wisdom, seldom followed, but often 
applied to the younger generation by their elders. 

In the fish world, this sage advice could hardly apply to 
the MENHADEN, which keeps its mouth open at all times 
and "drinks" thousands of gallons of water each day, 
thereby helping develop his complicated and mineral-rich 
body. 

Thus, by keeping his mouth open, the MENHADEN has 
become the most important fish that swims the Atlantic. In 
this oil-hungry world, the fish has become more valuable 
than ever, and shipments from the manufacturing plants 
on the North Carolina Coast have steadily increased. 



& 



., 



*? • 



sast^UftLMi-Isi 



— Jk i 



tlfJk 



The Menhaden fleet ready to sail. While the crow's nest is 
helpful, the modern fleet uses "spotter" planes in detecting 
Menhaden fish schools. 



COMES OF AGE 




Grueling work, above, for the crew is the drawing of the net to 
hold the trapped fish. This work is done from the long boats. 
Next, a scooping basket-net, or pump is used to get the fish 
into the hold of the fishing ship. 



At right, the Menhaden finds that he has become oil for 
many industries — from soaps to paints, after having been 
chopped, steamed and otherwise dehydrated. A great portion 
of his body also becomes poultry feed (fish meal). 

Morehead City, Beaufort, Wilmington and Southport are 
the major processing centers for Menhaden in North Caro- 
lina. The state-owned Ocean Terminals at Morehead City 
is a major exporter of the fish oils. 

Many new uses have been discovered for the oils taken 
from the Menhaden, or Fatback or Mossbunker, as he is 
also called. Manufacturers used it in hot dip tinning, terne 
plating and galvanizing, in the manufacture of insulating 
varnishes, ship bottom paints, soaps, lubricants, synthetic 
rubber products and many others. 

The Menhaden has been providing oil, animal food and 
fertilizer since the days of the Pilgrim fathers, and earlier, 
when the Algonquin Indian called him "MUNNAWHAT- 
TEAUG" or, in translation, "HE ENRICHES THE SOIL". 





Menhaden oil is transported from the factory to oil tanks 
at the State Ports Authority terminals. It arrives by truck on 
specially designed rubber containers, where it is pumped 
from bag to tank to waiting tanker for shipment to foreign 
markets. 



Setting the Pace 
in the Port City 

The Most Progressive Bank 

in the 

South's Most Progressive State 



SECURITY 

NATIONAL BANK 



WILMINGTON 

GREENSBORO, HIGH POINT, BURLINGTON, 
RALEIGH, TARBORO 

"North Carolina's Largest Notionol Bank" 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 
MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP 



FCX SERVES FARMERS... 



UNSS^ 







-rr 




THE BANK OF 


WILMING1 


roN 


MEN 


BER 


FEDERAL DEPOSIT 


INSURANCE C 


ORPORATION 


/01&\ 




Xcn^X 




WILMINGTON 


NORTH CAROLINA 



. . . WITH PORTS' HELP 



Stockholders of the FCX— Farmers Cooperative Exchange 
—are increasing their dividends by purchases which travel 
through the N. C. State Ports Authority terminals at More- 
head City and Wilmington. In 1958, the FXC volume of 
business amounted to $55 % million and has assets of over 
S18 million and a net worth of approximately $11% million. 

Savings realized by purchase of volume materials via the 
State-operated deep water terminals are passed along to 
the consumer— most of whom are farmers. 

L. E. Hinnant, Director of Purchasing for FCX in Ra- 
leigh, states that the company has made considerable use 
of the ports' facilities at Wilmington and Morehead City. 

"Our primary cargo," say Mr. Hinnant, "is imported 
steel products. These port facilities afford us excellent dis- 
tribution points, and by using the State Ports as points of 
entry, we find our product to be in close proximity to our 
final delivery point. Thus we are able to economically dis- 
tribute these products to our farmer-patrons throughout 
the two Carolinas. Our working relationship with the per- 
sonnel has been very good. 

"We look forward to discontinued expansion of these 
ports in order that they might provide us with extended 
services." 




Agency Index 
Promotes Exports 

Are you taking advantage of a service designed 
to put prospective foreign buyers in speedy couch 
with local sources of supply tor your products? 
All you need to do is list the names and addresses 
of your oversea agents, distributors, or licensees 
with U. S. Foreign Service posts through the Bu- 
reau of Foreign Commerce. 

Foreign Service officers handling commercial 
matters in countries abroad frecpiently receive in- 
quiries about how purchases of American goods 
can be made locally. By having at their fingertips 
the names and addresses of agents and licensees 
for American concerns, they will be able to place 
before prospective customers information on local 
sources of all 11. S. products listed. Buyers interest- 
ed in a trademarked product or replacement equip- 
ment will be able to contact local representatives 
quickly and arrange to expedite delivery if the 
merchandise is urgently needed. This stepped-up 
service should stimulate sales of U.S. products. 

American manufacturers and exporters are in- 
vited to prepare 3 x 5 cards on their agents and 
licensees in each foreign country and send them to 
their Department of Commerce Field Office or to 
the Bureau of Foreign Commerce. The Bureau will 
forward the cards to the appropriate Foreign Serv- 
ice post. The data are not lor publication. 

Copies of this form (FC-30) are available from 
any of the 33 Department of Commerce Field Of- 
fices or from the Bureau's Commercial Intelligence 
Division. 11 preferred, firms may prepare their own 
forms by using blank 3 x 5 cards and following the 
format above. Special explanatory comments about 
a product may be included on the back of the card. 

At least one card is needed for each country 
where a representative or licensee is located. II a 



firm has split representation lor different products 
or more than one agent or licensee in one country, 
separate cards should be submitted. 

All U.S. manufacturers and exporters with rep 
resentation overseas are urged to send in their 
agency information promptly and to keep it ( in 
rent by submitting replacement cards whencwi 
changes occur or new arrangements arc made 
With this information the Foreign Service can be 
of greater help in promoting the ready sale ol I f.S, 
products in foreign markets. 



1. Name and address of U.S. manufacturer and its U.S. ' 
export representative, if any; or name and address i 
of U.S. export concern and the U.S. manufacturer I 
represented. NOTE: This card will be indexed under 
name first given. More than one card m.i\ be sub- I 
mined if appropriate. This should be done when I 
inquiries might be received under trade names or . 
names of subsidiaries. 

2. Product (s) exported, including trademarks (place I 
additional comments on reverse) ' 

3. Name and address of representative or licensee ' 

4. Type of representation 5. Territory covered Date I 

(exclusive or nonexclu- i 
sive agent, distributor, 
licensee, etc.) 



Form FC-30 (8-3-59) 
USCOMM-DC 32276-P 

AGENCY INDEX 
U. S. Department of Commerce 
Hun. in of Foreien Commerce 



Budget Bureau • 

No. 41-R1982 I 

Approval Expires I 
June 10, /<V>2 



Mail completed form to the nearest I'.S. Department 
of Commerce Field Office, or to the Commercial In- 
telligence I)i\ision. Bureau ol l-'oreign Commerce, I s 
Department of Commerce, Washington 25, D.< 

Joel II. New. Business Analyst 
U. S. Dcpt. of Commerce 
I'. (). Box 1950. Room 408 
Post Office BldR. 
Greensboro, N. C. 




Shown here is the architect's conception of the two new soon-to-be constructed berths of steel and 
concrete, transit shed (120,000 square feet) and a large paved open berth, at State Docks, Wilm- 
ington. A neiu 100,000 square foot warehouse will soon be erected behind the transit shed. 



WILMINGTON 



N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Al Smith, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is, 1,510 feet long with a 46-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing three 500-foot vessels simultaneously, 
with depth of 34 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 79,000 square 
feet each, constructed of steel, concrete and mason- 
ry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSE: One storage of warehouse of 86,100 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and ma- 
sonry, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

OPEN STORAGE: Ten acres of paved open storage, 
easily accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. Certified weighmasters on 
twenty-four hour duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron; also depressed tracks at 
rear of transit sheds and warehouse, entire length. 
Storage yard on property for 240 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes 
for heavy lifts, single or in tandem, and equipped 



for 80-inch magnet work and 2-yard bucket opera- 
tion. 

One 35-ton locomotive crane and one 25-ton loco- 
motive crane. 
Three Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of 
various sizes with accessories such as cotton clamps, 
etc. Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton 
mobile crane. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at the transit sheds 
and warehouse; ramps for easy access into sheds 
and warehouses; portable side and end loading 
ramps for rail cars. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumiga- 
tion plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Export crating service available. 

Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Sea- 
board Air Line Railroad Companies and numerous 
highway motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



8 



^m^M^ 



Here is construction at Morehead City, showing completed 90,000 square foot warehouse, water 
tank, additional railroad facilities. Another 80,000 square foot warehouse luill soon he constructed. 



MOREHEAD CITY 



N. C. OCEAN TERMINALS 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable 
of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petro- 
leum tanker, with a depth of 30 feet at mean low 
water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: One transit shed of 60,000 square 
feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinklers. 

One transit shed, 32,000 square feet, constructed 
of galvanized iron, with sprinklers. 
A third transit shed, the newest, is of pre-fabricated 
steel construction with sprinklers and has capacity 
of 40,000 square feet. 

WAREHOUSES: Three storage warehouses, totaling 
178,000 square feet, with sprinklers. 

OPEN STORAGE: A large Open storage area is avail- 
able. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. At- 



lantic and East Carolina Railway freight car storage 
yard adjacent to Port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization of 
cargoes. 
Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Excellent facilities for loading 
grain in ships or barges. 250 tons hour capacity. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easy access into transit sheds and 
warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Up-to-date fumigation plant of most 
modern concrete and steel construction is now in 
operation. Large single chamber is of latest design. 

SERVICES: The Southern Railway System. One in- 
terstate truck line on property, and served by num- 
erous highway motor transportation companies. 

SECURITY: Security force on dutv at all times. 



VISITORS 





The relaxed smiles of these are testimonials 
of the advantages of passenger travel by 
cargo ship. W. B. Ewing and Mrs. Ewing 
(lower right) arrived from Sweden aboard the 
Norwegian ship "Thalatta", at State Docks, 
Wilmington. Formerly of Camp Davis, N. C, 
the Ewings motored from Wilmington to 
their home in Delray Beach, Florida. Ac- 
companying the former Carolinians was Mrs. 
Mary Lauris, Swedish by birth but a "Tampa, 
Florida American" since 1922. 



While Lou Larcombe, N. C. State Ports Authority Rep- 
resentative, left, is no visitor to State Docks, Wilming- 
ton, HIS visitors are just as happy in their work as he is. 
They are, center: F. E. Wilson, Division Freight and 
Passenger Agent, and right, E. Norman Quayle, Assis- 
tant Freight Traffic Manager, Seaboard Air Line Rail- 
road. 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents - Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

P. O. BOX 249 
TELEPHONES 




PArk 6-4651 

CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 

Peter B. Ruffin 

President 

W. P. Emerson 

Vice-President 

Wade H. Pierce 

Assistant Secretary 



PArk 6-4652 
William T. Davies 

Manager 

W. D. Williams 

Secretary 

J. P. Wilson 

Treasurer 

Lemuel L. Doss, Jr. 

Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 376 



At left above, the "CANOPUS" casts off at Morehead's Ocean 
Terminals with Congressman Donald L. Jackson (Republican, 
16th Dist., California) at the tiller. Coiling rope is William 
Lamb, former Coastguardsman. At right, above, Congressman 
Jackson, in dark shirt, and Commander C. G. Winstead, check- 
ered shirt, discuss maritime affairs on the wing deck of the 
Coast Guard's "CHILULA". 



Hulls 



Cargoes 



Yachts 



P. O. BOX 897 
RO 2-7721 




ESTABLISHED 
1878 



Protection £r Indemnity 
All Other Marine & Overseas Coverages 



10 




Southern Advertising Executives mode news at Morehead's 
Ocean Terminals. They were given the grand tour after trying 
their fishing luck off the Carolina Coast. They are, from left 
to right: James S. Ayers and Ruth Webb of James S. Ayers, 
Inc., Atlanta, Georgia; Mary Jean Meadows of Liller, Neal, 
Battle & Lindsey, Inc., Atlanta; T. H. Patterson, Exec. Vice- 
Pres., WITN (TV), Washington, N. C; Mrs. Bea Broome, 
Washington, N. C; Martin Hollinger of Burke Dowling Adams, 
Inc., Atlanta; Mrs. Myrtle Patterson, Washington, N. C; Earl 
Broome, Sales Mgr., WITN, Washington, N. C; Mrs. Frances 
Roberson, Washington, H. C; Dorothy Lee Nelms of Liller, 
Neal, Battle & Lindsey, Inc., Atlanta; Ted Cramer, Bennett 
Advertising, High Point, N. C; and Guy Vaughan, James S. 
Ayers, Inc., Charlotte, N. C. 



W. J. Carrier, Butler Mfg. 
Co. representative, pauses 
briefly at State Docks, Wil- 
mington. 




The Greensboro Daily News and Greensboro Rec- 
ord had its representative at Ocean Terminals in 
an unofficial capacity in August. Appearing here 
are Mr. G. A. Denny, Division Manager, Circula- 
tion Dept., with Mrs. Denny, left, and two daugh- 
ters Sandra, center, and Annette, riqht. Salient 
points of ships and shipping were gleaned as the 
Isthmian Line ship "Steel Architect" took on 
tobacco for the Far East. 



inspecting N. C. State Docks. 
From left to right: Mr. W. S. R. 
Beane, President, Heide & Com- 
pany, Wilmington, N. C; Mr. 
Hugo Jensen, Manager, Ozean- 
Stinnes-Linien, Hamburg, Ger- 
many; and Mr. Ruff A. 
De Vane, Assistant Treasurer- 
Comptroller, N. C. State Ports 
Authority, Wilmington, N. C. 





Colonel Richard P. Davidson, center, Dis- 
trict Engineer, Wilmington, N. C, is inspect- 
ing State Docks, Wilmington, with Peter B. 
Ruffin, right, Wilmington Shipping Company 
and Major Leonard Edelstein, left, Deputy 
District Engineer. Colonel Davidson assumed 
his District Engineer appointment August 21. 



John L. (Jack) Skinner, architect 
(F.A.I. A.) of Stewart and Skinner, 
architects for the famous Miami 
International Airport, was backed 
against a Southern Railway car at 
Ocean Terminals, Morehead, by 
the photographer. Mr. Skinner al- 
ternates between Little Switzerland, 
N. C.j Florida and the far reaches 
of the globe. He has just recently 
returned from completing exten- 
sive architectural work in South 
America. 




SHIP OVERSEAS 

WITH THE GREATEST OF EASE 

The Southern connects almost every major 
citj in the fast-growing South. H hether you 
are an importer or exporter, our traffic 
specialists may be able to help you sure time, 
trouble and money . 



M SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



II 



MAKING SOUTH AMERICA SHINE 



BABCOX AND WILCOX SHIPS 




This large, cumbersome and complicated burner throat at left, usually for a utility boiler, is babied by R. D. Hatcher, left. Quality 
Control, and "Honey" Brewer, Tube Department at Babcock and Wilcox Company, Wilmington. It weighs 13 tons. The FM 
"package Boiler" units at right are in various stages of fabrication. Many of these 20 ton units have left for foreign ports by 
way of N. C. State Docks. Some of this equipment may move to State Docks own "Fab Shop" to await shipment. 




Tube bundles in gondolas alongside the "Loide Haiti," bound 
for Rio de Janeiro, Brazil for the Braselara de Energies Elec- 
trica. 



GREENHEART 

Piling, Timbers and Lumber in the Construction 

of Steamship Piers, Railroad Trestles and 

Bridges and Heavy Duty Flooring. 

GREENHEART, (Demerara), Inc. 

52 VANDERBILT AVtNUE — NEW YORK, N. Y. 
TELEPHONE: MURRAY HILL 6-0410 

GREENHEART is highly resistant to marine borers, to fire and 

to abrasion. It is particularly suitable for flooring, bulkheads, 

dolphins, rubbing posts, etc. 

GREENHEART fender systems are in use at the N. C. State 
docks at both Wilmington and Morehead City, N. C. 



Babcox and Wilcox has been a steady customer 
to State Docks Since 1954. Though the Port con- 
tinues to expand with new customers, it is a very 
pleasant experience to serve those friends of long 
standing. 

Babcox and Wilcox equipment presents some 
interesting shipping problems for State Docks per- 
sonnel. According to H. H. Trussel, Production 
Manager for the B & W plant in Wilmington, these 
problems always receive the personal attention by 
port's personnel for which both N. C. State-owned 
terminals are becoming famous . . . resulting in a 
smooth flow of goods. 

The personal interest shown by State Docks 
operations manager and other members of the 
staff have led to a broadning educational experi- 
ence for them. While not engineers, they have 
learned that the B & W "Tube Bundles" stacked 
in State Dock's Fab Shop will eventually be part 
of a steam generating plant in South America. 
Once connected and erected according to engineer- 
ing plans, these bundles may rise seven or eight 
stories high. Such units may be part of equipment 
which requires two years to erect. 

Seeing a "big tank" on a flatcar has led to other 
intellectual curosity. The big tanks are "package 
boilers" known as the Babcock and Wilcox "F-M 
Unit". These boilers can be taken off ship at its 
destination, immediately connected and put into 
operation. 



12 



THROUGH WILMINGTON 








-r 





At left, assembled B & W Air Heater Tube Sheets are being loaded in a gondola. Even by using diesel crane, the equipment barely 
clears the side of the car. According to H. H. Trussel, Production Mgr., when Babcock and Wilcox Co. first came to N. C, Port 
requirements were new to his people and the B & W material presented a new type of handling problem for State Docks. "Through 
exceptionally fine mutual cooperation our problems have been solved with a minimum of trouble," the Production Manager has 
stated. Respect for the work being done by personnel at both State Docks and B & W is mutual. Recently, the B & W Club learned 
about shipping by a personal visit to the State Docks, and a personal tour by Al C. Smith, Operations Manager. From left to right, 
they are: Front Row — Charles Jarrell, Al Hewett, Ben Norton, Frank Weiss, Jesse Williams and Jimmy Stokley. Second Row — 
R. L. Burnett, Charles McCarthy, Jimmy McLean, Carl Sexton, Maurie Kulp, George Mihal and Al Smith, State Ports. Third Row — 
A. M. Rogers, Walt Howard, Jack Balk, J. R. Reuling, Lester Robinson, L. M. Woodcock, Dick Renninger, D. R. Smith and Lewis 
Freshwater. 




J 



At left, the boiler components are loaded aboard ship. At 
right, D Ouintero Representative for Ebasco International 
Corporation, New York, watches the loading operation. 



If you've 
got it... a truck 

brought it ! 





s$- 



£*"?"$' ~-^., ; , v ,„ i4 . 



SHIP LAUNDRY 
AND DRY CLEANING 

One Day Service 

• 

IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 
CLEANERS, INC. 

FRONT 4 ORANGE STREETS — PHONE RO 2-6651 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

"Serving Ships Since 1919" 




YES, TO YOUR VERY DOOR 

FROM SHIPSIDE 

To your very door 

BY TRUCK 

The N. C. Trucking Ii»dus!ry aerves Ihe line Norlh Caro- 
lina Ports. Trucks serve everyone— especially the more 
than 1800 Tar Heel communities entirely dependent on 
Trucks for everything to eat, wear, use and sell. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS 
ASSOCIATION. INC. 

Trucking Industry Building Raleigh. N. C. 



13 



AT OCEAN TERMINALS 



MILLIONS IN TOBACCO PURCHASES 




Members of a Thailand inspecting team, representing the Thailand Tobacco Monopoly of Bangkok, pause during their inspection 

tour at the state port. Left to right they are Mr. Uthai Thoonkapbalin, Mr. Seranie Chinwala, Mr. K. Giatniramit — in back. 

Major General Amphorn Chintaganonda — in front center, Mr. Jim Edmundson — in back, Mr. Deng Sriyong — against Hhd. and 

Mr. Doug Jones — of W. L. Robinson extreme right. 

One of the largest barter transactions ever made in the tobacco industry was completed at the Morehead City State Port when 

Thailand received 8,000,000 pounds of tobacco from the W. L. Robinson Tobacco Co. of Durham, in exchange for an equal dollar- 

for-dollar amount of Thailand tin. 

In Morehead City to complete the transaction were members of a Thailand inspection team headed by the executive secretary to the 

prime minister of Thailand, Maj. Gen. Amphorn Chintaganonda. The general and his staff spent the week inspecting the tobacco 

that will be shipped to Thailand. 




The Chcmstrand Corporation, which has more than a passing interest in North Carolina, is making use of its ports as well as its 
Research Triangle. The Company recently shipped these containers of resin plastic powder from State Docks, Wilmington. 



14 



AMERICAN EXPORT LINES TO SERVE N. C. 



Express Calls At Wil. & M'head Approved By F. M. A. 

I ; 

4 




■ 


















S. S. EXBROOK, one of the 24 express cargo vessels owned and operated by American Export Lines. The 16' 2 -knot vessel is one 
of the famous "Exporter" type, specially designed by company operations experts. 

Vice Admiral John M. Will, USN, left above, veteran Navy submariner and Commander of the Navy's Military Sea Transporta- 
tion Service became President of American Export Lines, Inc. July 1. Conway Studio Photo. 

Frank G. Slater, right above, 61 Stratford Avenue, Garden City, N. Y., who has been elected Vice President, Freight Traffic, 
American Export Lines. Associated with freight traffic since 1915, he joined American Export Lines in 1941, and has served as 
Assistant Freight Traffic Manager, and Freight Traffic Manager. Blackstone Studio Photo. 



American Export Lines, 40 year-old steam ship company, 
has been authorized to begin service between North Caro- 
lina's two State-owned deep water terminals at Morehead 
City and Wilmington to principal ports in the Mediter- 
ranean. 

The announcement came from Stale Ports Authority 
Executive Director D. Leon Williams and officials of Amer- 
ican Export Lines, immediately alter approval by the Fed- 
eral Maritime Administration. 

The Maritime Administration approved the extension of 
"Trade Route 10" to include N. C. ports in a formal note 
lo American Export Lines dated October third. By desig- 
nation, Trade Route 10 serves the major ports of Portugal, 
Spain and the Northern Shores of the Mediterranean. 

This open an entirely new area of track- lor the two 
North Carolina State Ports, as the new route includes about 
100 major ports in the Mediterranean area. 

The new steam ship service to the North Carolina ports 
was brought about alter four months negotiations by mem- 
bers of the N. C. State Ports Authority, its Executive Di- 
rector and the N. C. Delegation in Washington. 

American Export Lines announced that "our cargo liner 
schedules will be a great convenience to Southern receivers 
of Grecian and Turkish Tobaccos. 

"In obtaining approval [or this extension ol our Medi- 
terranean Services on essential I i.idr Route 10. we have 
had the excellent cooperation ol the N. C. State Ports Au- 
thority and its Executive Director, Mr. D. Leon Williams." 

The 10 year-old company has won an outstanding repu- 
tation as a liner operator between the U. S. and all prin- 
cipal ports of the Mediterranean, Portugal, Spain, Adriatic 
Sea. Black Sea. Red Sea, India. Pakistan, Ceylon and Burma. 

American Export became the lust to win lour consecu- 
tive commendations lor sanitatv conditions maintained 
aboard ship- The U. S, Public Health's highest commenda 
don. 



CAROLINA FORWARDING 
CORPORATION 

FMB 2309 

International 

Freight Forwarders 

and 

Customhouse Brokers 

• 

"Personalized Service" 



WILMINGTON MOREHEAD CITY 

Telephone RO 35161 Telephone PA 6-5080 



15 



SHADES OF 




CLEOPATRA 



The Cleopatra, ship of the Khedivial Mail Line, Egypt, 
at rest at Ocean Terminals. An ex-victory ship, she car- 
ries a crew of 100»ond has first class accommodations 
for 78 passengers. While the ship encountered no prob- 
lems loading export tobacco at Morehead, the Egyptians 
noted that they did have certain water problems at home. 
They expect to spend 150 million dollars to save Egyptian 
temples threatened with inundation after the Aswan 
Dam is built. Work on the Dam begins in December, and 
saving the temples will probably cost more than the dam 
itself. After the Aswan Dam is completed, a lake will 
extend 400 miles through the historic Nubian Valley. A 
total of 19 temples are expected to be flooded. 




Visitors aboard the Cleopatra during her first call were: 
(out of uniform) R. O. Fleming (sitting) and R. B. Rid- 
dick (right), tobacco buyers for Greenville Tobacco Com- 
pany, Greenville. At left is Roger A. Massey, Vice- 
President, W. O. Smith & Company, Norfolk, Internation- 
al Forwarding Agents. 

Ship's officers are, sitting: Abdul Monem (writing for 
the cameraman) and George Copty. Standing are, left to 
right: Hassan Farrag, Foad Sukas, Capt. A. Hamdy, R. 
Krayza, M. Nagib and Mostafa Nasr. 

Belying the misconception 
that many Chamber of 
Commerce Managers do not 
work on Saturday is O. A. 
Wright, Manager, New Bern 
C of C. He made a special 
trip to observe Ocean Ter- 
minals dock and ship oper- 
ations. The Morehead City 
Chamber of Commerce Man- 
ager, Joe DuBoise, was also 
on hand (speaking diplo- 
matic German with Chief 
Engineer R. Krzyza). North 
Carolina can thank these 
two for helping make Egypt 
a closer neighbor. 



16 





The fact that the S/S* Cleopatra, first of the United 
Arab Republic ships to call at Ocean Terminals, 
Morehead City, was in a North Carolina port at all 
could be attributed to the hard work of several N. C. 
tobacco exporters. 

Outstanding among those tobacconists working par- 
ticularly to bring a U.A.R. ship to North Carolina 
shores was the A. C. MONK COMPANY OF FARM- 
VILLE. And, the Prime-Mover for Mr. Monk's ex- 
port department is TOM RYAN. 

Other hard-working companies are: Monk Hender- 
son, Greenville Tobacco Co. and Thorp & Ricks. 

Outstanding also was the swift loading ot tne ex- 
port leaf aboard the Cleopatra and the most courteous 
treatment by Capt. A. Hamdy and his officers and 
men to local representatives. In any event, it was a 
"milestone day" for Ocean Terminals. 
(LINE DRAWING COURTESY N. C. MUSEUM 
OF ART") 




Mayor George W. Dill presents the key to Morehead City 
to Capt. A. Hamdy of the Cleopatra. (Photo by Larry 
McComb, Carteret News-Times). 



/ / 
berth Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 







NEW PORTS AUTHORITY MEMBERS 




feflg 




fW 




Subsequent- to authorization by the 1959 Legislature and appointment by Governor Luther Hodges, two new members of the North 
Carolina State Ports Authority were sworn into office on August 22. The Authority now has nine members. 

The swearing in took place in the State Ports Raleigh office, with Secretary of State Thad Eure (right) administering the oath of 
office. Taking the oath are, left, Harvey C. Hines of Kinston and Thomas M. Evins, center, of Durham. 

Hines is president of the Coca-Cola Bottling Company in Kinston and the Hines Ice Cream Company. He is married and the father 
of three children. 

Evins is president of the W. L. Robinson Tobacco Company in Durham and is a tobacco exporter. He is married and the father of 
three children. 

The two were sworn in on the eve of the Ports Authority's trip to Europe, in cooperation with the N. C. Department of Commerce 
and Industry. While Hines will make the European tour in a bid for Ports business and good will, Evins must remain at home during 
the "bread-and-butter season" of the tobacco export business. Other members of the SPA who will make the October 3 1st- Novem- 
ber 15th European tour include Collier Cobb, Jr., Chapel Hill; Charles Gray, Gasronia; Earl Phillips, High Point; and Chairman 
John Reeves, Pinehurst. D. Leon Williams, Executive Director for the Ports Authority, will also make the European tour. Governor 
Luther Hodges will lead the group, which will include some 50 business, industrial and agricultural leaders. 



We invite . . . 




shippers 



growers and 




manufacturers 



* merchants 



to use our complete banking facilities in the 

port of Morehead City. 

In Morehead City . . . Beaufort 

Raleigh and other 

fine N. C. communities. 

SERVING NORTH CAROLINA SINCE 1898 




IRST- 
CITIZENS 

BANK {TRUST 
COMPAT 



MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

Suite 220, Education Bldg. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Permit No. 32 




N. C. State Port Authority Officials, seeking to develop stronger trade 
through the two state-owned deep water terminals-Ocean Terminals 
at Morehead City and State Docks, Wilmington, left October 31 with 
N. C. Department of Conservation and Development Officials, Gover- 
nor Luther Hodges and some 50 N. C. Business, Industry and Agri- 
cultural Leaders. 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



3 3091 00748 2961